Company Information

South Sound Inspection

253-820-9650
robjones@southsoundinspection.com
http://www.southsoundinspection.com

Inspector: Robert Jones: WA State License #256, WA State Pest License #64730
Published Report

The Scope and Purpose of a Home Inspection

Purchasing property involves risk

The purpose of a home inspection is to help reduce the risk associated with the purchase of a structure by providing a professional opinion about the overall condition of the structure. A home inspection is a limited visual inspection and it cannot eliminate this risk. Some homes present more risks than others. We cannot control this, but we try to help educate you about what we don’t know during the inspection process. This is more difficult to convey in a report and one of many reasons why we recommend that you attend the inspection.

A home inspection is not an insurance policy

This report does not substitute for or serve as a warranty or guarantee of any kind. Home warranties can be purchased separately from insuring firms that provide this service.

A home inspection is visual and not destructive

The descriptions and observations in this report are based on a visual inspection of the structure. We inspect the aspects of the structure that can be viewed without dismantling, damaging or disfiguring the structure and without moving furniture and interior furnishings. Areas that are concealed, hidden or inaccessible to view are not covered by this inspection. Some systems cannot be tested during this inspection as testing risks damaging the building. For example, overflow drains on bathtubs are generally not tested because if they were found to be leaking they could damage the finishes below. Our procedures involve non-invasive investigation and non-destructive testing which will limit the scope of the inspection.

This is not an inspection for code compliance

This inspection and report are not intended for city / local code compliance. During the construction process structures are inspected for code compliance by municipal inspectors. Framing is open at this time and conditions can be fully viewed. Framing is not open during inspections of finished homes, and this limits the inspection. All houses fall out of code compliance shortly after they are built, as the codes continually change. National codes are augmented at least every three years for all of the varying disciplines. Municipalities can choose to adopt and phase in sections of the codes on their own timetables. There are generally no requirements to bring older homes into compliance unless substantial renovation is being done.

This is just our opinion

Construction techniques and standards vary. There is no one way to build a house or install a system in a house. The observations in this report are the opinions of the home inspector. Other inspectors and contractors are likely to have some differing opinions. You are welcome to seek opinions from other professionals.

The scope of this inspection

This inspection will include the following systems: exterior, roof, structure, drainage, foundation, attic, interior, plumbing, electrical and heating. The evaluation will be based on limited observations that are primarily visual and non-invasive. This inspection and report are not intended to be technically exhaustive.

For more about the scope of a home inspection see: ASHI National Standards at https://www.homeinspector.org/Resources/Standard-of-Practice or Washington State Home Inspection Standards at http://app.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=18.280.030

Your expectations

The overall goal of a home inspection is to help ensure that your expectations are appropriate with the house you are proposing to buy. To this end we assist with discovery by showing and documenting observations during the home inspection. This should not be mistaken for a technically exhaustive inspection designed to uncover every defect with a building. Such inspections are available but they are generally cost-prohibitive to most homebuyers.

Your participation is requested

Your presence is requested during this inspection. A written report will not substitute for all the possible information that can be conveyed verbally by a shared visual observation of the conditions of the property.

How to Read This Report

Getting the Information to You

This report is designed to deliver important and technical information in a way that is easy for anyone to access and understand. If you are in a hurry, you can take a quick look at our "Summary Page” and quickly get critical information for important decision making. However, we strongly recommend that you take the time to read the full Report, which includes digital photographs, captions, diagrams, descriptions, videos and hot links to additional information.

The best way to get the layers of information that are presented in this report is to read your report online, which will allow you to expand your learning about your house. You will notice some words or series of words highlighted in blue and underlined – clicking on these will provide you with a link to additional information.

This report can also be printed on paper or to a PDF document.

Chapters and Sections

This report is divided into chapters that parcel the home into logical inspection components. Each chapter is broken into sections that relate to a specific system or component of the home. You can navigate between chapters with the click of a button on the left side margin.

Most sections will contain some descriptive information done in black font. Observation narrative, done in colored boxes, will be included if a system or component is found to be significantly deficient in some way or if we wish to provide helpful additional information about the system or the scope of our inspection. If a system or component of the home was deemed to be in satisfactory or serviceable condition, there may be no narrative observation comments in that section and it may simply say “tested,” or “inspected.”

Observation Labels

All narrative observations are colored, numbered and labeled to help you find, refer to, and understand the severity of the observation. Observation colors and labels used in this report are:

  • Repair:
    Repair and maintenance items noted during inspection. Please note that some repair items can be expensive to correct such as re-finishing hardwood floors, but are considered simply repair items due to their cosmetic nature.
  • Recommended Maintenance:
    These are repair items that should be considered "routine home ownership items," such as servicing the furnace, cleaning the gutters or changing the air filters in the furnace.
  • Improve:
    Observations that are not necessarily defects, but which could be improved for safety, efficiency, or reliability reasons.
  • Due Diligence:
    Observation such as a buried oil tank that may require further investigation to determine the severity and / or urgency of repair.
  • Note:
    Refers to aside information and /or any comments elaborating on descriptions of systems in the home or limitations to the home inspection.
  • Description:
    Detailed description of various aspects of the property noted during the inspection.

Summary Page

The Summary Page is designed as a bulleted overview of all the observations noted during inspection. This helpful overview is not a substitution for reading the entire inspection report. The entire report must be read to get a complete understanding of this inspection report as the Summary Page does not include photographs or photo captions.

Moisture Meter Testing

Where moisture meter testing is indicated in this report aMoisture Encounter Plus was used.

Summary

Repairs

  • G1-2 Grounds:

    Cracks were noted in walkway flatwork. No immediate repair appears necessary, though water will continue to deteriorate the surface until the walkway is repaired or replaced.

  • G1-4 Grounds:

    The step at the front porch exceeds 7-7.5". This could be a tripping hazard.

  • G1-5 Grounds:

    There are sections of fencing, around the pool that are loose. For safety reasons, repair is recommended.

  • RCG-2 Roof, Chimney and Gutters:

    Repairs are needed to the masonry chimney. The conditions noted here could increase the risk of moisture control problems related to the chimney. Neglecting maintenance on masonry chimneys can also lead to loose or damaged bricks and eventually a failing masonry system. Hire a licensed masonry contractor to further evaluate and repair the masonry chimney as recommended. Examples of observations noted during inspection include:

    Chimney Caps

    • The chimney is missing a proper rain cap for moisture control
    • The chimney is missing a proper spark arrestor - these are important where wood burning fireplaces can allow embers to escape
  • RCG-3 Roof, Chimney and Gutters:

    Be sure that all downspouts are extended to drain as far away from the foundation as possible.

  • EDFW-2 Electric Distribution and Finish Wiring:

    Hire a licensed electrician to eliminate all open grounds. This is a common condition in older buildings (prior to 1962) where three prong receptacles have been installed on an older two wire system. This creates a safety hazard as it is false advertising; appliances that rely on an equipment ground to discharge a fault can be plugged into ungrounded circuits. This disables the important safety feature of an equipment ground. Proper repair can include:

    • Running an equipment grounding conductor or a new three-wire circuit
    • Filling the third prong of the receptacle or restoring a two-prong receptacle or
    • Installing GFCI protection for this circuit and labeling the open ground receptacles

    If GFCI protection is used, the outlets on this circuit should be labeled so it is clear they are ungrounded and GFCI protected. Examples of locations where open grounds were found include:

  • HCFV-2 Heating, Cooling, Fireplaces and Ventilation:

    The dryer vent, at the back of the home, has a cover, however, it needs some mesh to prevent insect nesting.

  • HCFV-4 Heating, Cooling, Fireplaces and Ventilation:

    Missing mortar and loose brick were noted in the fireplace firebox. This can make the fireplace unsafe for fires. Hire a mason or chimney sweep to further evaluate this condition and repair as needed to ensure safe and reliable performance from the fireplace. Firebox repairs need to be made using firebrick and proper refractory mortars designed for high temperatures.

  • P2-4 Plumbing:

    Testing of the plumbing system today, I noted the water was too hot - 148 degrees F. This is a scald hazard. To prevent scalding, standards recommend indoor hot water temperatures do not exceed 120 degrees. There is some evidence that hot water temperatures should be greater than 130 degrees to prevent Legionaries' disease from developing in the water heater. If this is a concern, you can heat the water in the tank to 140 degrees F and have a tempering valve installed at the hot water tank. Have this further evaluated and repaired by a licensed plumber or simply turn down the temperature as desired to eliminate a scald hazard.

  • P2-6 Plumbing:

    The exterior hose bib(s) are being controlled by a valve near the water shut in the basement. I believe that this is due to the fact that the bib at the front, has a stripped handle. I recommend having a plumbing contractor make all needed repair to include the updating of the bibs.

  • I-2 Interior:

    The ends of the hand rail should return into the wall to prevent clothing or accessories from catching on the end of the railing and creating a trip hazard.

  • K-2 Kitchen:

    The slab surface countertop is cracked and requires repair or replacement. Consult with a slab granite installer about options for repair. Please note that proper repair could necessitate countertop replacement, a significant expense. Temporary repairs can often be made with sealants, though this is obviously less cosmetically appealing.

  • K-3 Kitchen:

    An air gap is recommended to protect the dishwasher from accidental contamination if the sewer line were to back up. If an air gap cannot be installed, at least run the drain line above the level of the sink drain to create a high loop. This was an older way of protecting the dishwasher. Hire a licensed plumber to install an air gap.

  • K-4 Kitchen:

    I was only able to get the right 2 burners to ignite. The middle and left burners did not light. Have a small appliance technician assess and make any needed repair.

  • MB1-2 Main Bathroom:

    The hot water handle at the left sink was loose at the basin. Repair is needed.

  • MB1-4 Main Bathroom:

    The right shower handle is leaking where the hose connects to the shower head.

  • MB1-5 Main Bathroom:

    The button that controls the jets, is loose.

  • GB2-2 Basement Bathroom:

    The basement bath shower diverter, which diverts water from the tub fill spigot to the shower head, is leaky and requires repair to prevent wasting water and to improve flow to the shower head.

  • A-2 Attic:

    The insulation in the attic area has been installed in between the rafters and against the roof deck. This can lead to trapped moisture. In this age of home, typically, the interior attic walls are insulated and not the roof. I recommend having an insulation contractor assess and make any needed repair.

  • CS-1 Crawl Space:

    Overall, numerous repairs are needed to the crawl space below this house. I have made a series of detailed observations in this observations but given the extent of repairs I recommend further evaluation of this crawl space by a licensed general contractor who specializes in crawl space clean-up as additional repairs could be needed that are latent or concealed.

    Examples of Observations Noted During Inspection Include:

    • The crawl space access hatch is rotting and requires repair or replacement
    • The access hatch for the crawl space does not look rodent proof.
    • The sub-floor insulation is rodent-damaged and requires repair and replacement

Recommended Maintenance Items

  • G1-3 Grounds:

    Pruning trees, branches and vegetation away from the house is recommended. Where trees, branches and large shrubs can provide rodent access to the roof, a minimum 6-foot clearance is recommended as many rodents can jump 6-feet. All vegetation, including smaller landscaping such as grasses, flowers and shrubs should be kept 1-foot off the house to eliminate contact which could trap moisture against the building.

  • RCG-1 Roof, Chimney and Gutters:

    The NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) recommends an annual inspection of all chimneys, fireplaces, solid fuel-burning appliances, and vents. They also recommend an NFPA 211 Standard, Level II inspection upon sale or transfer of the property. A Level II inspection includes, not only cleaning the interior of the chimney pipe, but also the use of specialized tools and testing procedures such as video cameras, etc. to thoroughly evaluate the serviceability of the entire flue lining and fireplace/chimney system. Level II inspections are not always needed, especially for short simple flues that can be inspected visually after a cleaning. If a chimney cleaning has not been performed over the past 12 months, such an inspection is recommended before the home changes ownership---for fire safety reasons. Implement any repairs as recommended.

  • MB1-6 Main Bathroom:

    The jetted tub was filled and tested during inspection today. The jets performed well but algae was noted in the jets that contaminated the tub water during testing. Cleaning of the jets is needed to prevent this from happening.

Improves

  • P2-5 Plumbing:

    Older hose bibs were noted on this building. Updating the hose bibs is recommended. Modern hose bibs are typically "frost free," which are (arguably) more resistant to bursting in cold weather. They also have important vacuum breakers installed which can prevent water from your hoses backing into your water supply system. In the meantime, be sure to winterize your hose bibs during cold weather to prevent from freezing and consider adding a vacuum breaker to the end of the hose bib. The following video shows a vacuum breaker. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1vu_YMPPM2M

  • I-3 Interior:

    Some of the bedrooms in this house have older / missing escape and rescue openings - see the second floor bedroom's. Today, all bedrooms must have a second means of ingress and egress in case of emergency. This can be provided by a door but is typically provided by a window. Updating is recommended for improved safety, though updating is not a requirement. Unless there is a personal desire for these modern standards sooner, the logical time to improve this is during the next window replacement / updating.


    Modern escape and rescue openings must comply with these basic guidelines:

    • Minimum width of opening: 20 inches
    • Minimum height of opening: 24 inches
    • Minimum net clear opening at any grade floor level escape and rescue window: 5 square feet
    • Minimum net clear opening of other escape and rescue windows: 5.7 square feet
    • Maximum height of base of opening above interior side floor: 44 inches
    • Windows should open easily without the use of keys or tools

    And for window wells below grade:

    • Minimum net clear area of 9 square feet
    • Minimum horizontal projection and width of 36 inches
    • Wells with a vertical depth greater than 44 inches require a permanent ladder or steps usable with the window in the fully open position
  • LF-2 Laundry Facilities:

    A moisture alarm with water shut-off features is recommended under the washing machine to protect against accidental leaks in the supply hoses. Pans can be effective when there is a drain, but even these will not protect against a burst supply connector. A moisture alarm with automatic shut-off will. Watts is a brand I have seen installed: Link.

  • SB-1 Structure and Basement:

    As always with older homes steps can be taken to improve the seismic stability of this home. Improvements include bolting the home to the foundation, adding sheer panels to pony walls and installing positive connections between posts and beams and posts and footings. Consult with a licensed general contractor or company specializing in seismic retrofits to further evaluate and improve the structure.

Due Diligences

  • P2-1 Plumbing:

    No water meter was found. This house seems to be on a public water system, which should have a metering device. Inquire with the seller or the utility as needed to locate the water meter.

  • P2-2 Plumbing:

    The main water pipe from the street to the home appears to be done with old galvanized steel pipe. This pipe could require updating at any time. Evaluation of this pipe is beyond the scope of this inspection as the pipe is not visible. Keep this pipe in mind for updating should you do any other digging in the front of the home between the house and the water meter.

    • Please also note that when updating older metal pipes, there is a risk of disabling important grounding systems for your electrical service. During updates to older metal pipes, consider having your electrical grounding and bonding systems further investigated and repaired as recommended by a licensed electrical contractor.


  • P2-3 Plumbing:

    A video camera sewer scope is recommended. An evaluation of the sewer line below the ground is beyond the scope of this inspection. Due to the age and location of the building, a sewer scope is recommended to further evaluate the sewer line and the below ground connections between the house and the municipal sewer line. Sewer scopes are done using video cameras and can reveal the materials, condition and reliability of the sewer line. If that has been done recently, I recommend having a sewer scope performed.

  • AP-1 Additional Plumbing:

    Swimming pools are not within the scope of a residential home inspection and they are beyond the scope of this inspection. Still, there are general minimal rules that should be followed to provide safe conditions at these areas since these areas can be dangerous for children and adults.


    Limit Access for Safety: Though not required in all jurisdictions, pools should be completely surrounded by fencing material at least 4 feet in height. A slatted fence should have gaps no wider that 4 inches so kids can’t squeeze through. The gap at the bottom should be less than 2 inches, unless over concrete where is should be less than 4 inches. Gates should be of the self-closing and self-latching type. The latch should be out of a child’s reach.

    It is also recommended to install alarms. If the house serves as one of the walls of the pool enclosure, any door leading to the pool area should be protected with an alarm. In addition, consideration of an underwater pool alarm that sounds when something hits the water and is audible at the house interior is recommended. Pools covers may be permitted by some jurisdictions, but they don’t provide the passive protection that other alarm features may provide.


    Wiring Safety: Pools have electrical connections to pumps, heaters and lighting systems. All pool wiring is required to be GFCI protected and all metal in or around the pool is required to be bonded. These systems can be nearly impossible to verify. However, having a full evaluation of the pool wiring by a qualified electrical contractor is recommended, especially during a real estate transaction.


    It is recommended that this pool and the related equipment and electrical systems be inspected for operation and safety by a pool specialist. 

Notes

  • EDFW-1 Electric Distribution and Finish Wiring:

    During inspection I test all Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) devices that are readily accessible. GFCI's are those electric receptacles with re-set buttons that you commonly see in bathrooms, kitchens and at the exterior of the home. GFCI's are important safety devices that limit the duration of electrical shocks and have demonstrably saved lives. I recommend being aware of where re-set buttons are located in the house as GFCI's can trip and disable a circuit which can not be re-energized without re-setting the button. I avoid testing to determine if a receptacle or circuit is GFCI protected if it is not clear where the re-set button can be found. This is because re-set buttons can be concealed behind stored items, so such a test risks disabling a circuit in the home. Occasionally, during testing of GFCI's one can fail. This is a statistical reality that some of these devices will fail under testing and require replacement after testing.

  • MB1-3 Main Bathroom:

    The jetted tub in the main bath was filled and tested during inspection today.


📃 The Complete Inspection Report

General Comments

Building Characteristics, Conditions and Limitations

Approximate Square Footage: 3362

Approximate Year of Original Construction: 1960

Unless the wiring in the building has been fully updated, this building likely has wiring that predates the late 1980's. Branch circuit wiring installed in buildings built prior to the late 1980s is typically rated for a maximum temperature of only 60 degrees Celsius. This includes non-metallic sheathed (Romex) wiring, and both BX and AC metal-clad flexible wiring. Knob and tube wiring, typically installed in homes built prior to 1950, may be rated for even lower maximum temperatures. Newer electric fixtures including lighting and fans typically require wiring rated for 90 degrees Celsius. Connecting newer fixtures to older, 60-degree-rated wiring is a potential fire hazard. Repairs for such conditions may involve replacing the last few feet of wiring to newer fixtures with new 90-degree-rated wire, and installing a junction box to join the old and new wiring. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if any such incompatible components are installed. Based on the age of this building, be aware that such components may be present.

In 1978, federal laws were passed to prohibit use of lead and asbestos in building materials. Manufacturers of building materials were allowed to sell existing stocks of materials that were manufactured with lead and asbestos, so even buildings constructed as late as the mid-1980's could possibly contain lead or asbestos. Identification and testing for lead and asbestos and other environmental testing is beyond the scope of this home inspection. If you wish to seek additional information, I recommend contacting an environmental lab or industrial hygienist.

Attending the Inspection: Buyer and Buyer's Agent

Occupancy: Occupied

Animals Present: No

Weather during the inspection: Clear

Approximate temperature during the inspection: Over 80[F]

Ground/Soil surface conditions: Dry

This home was occupied at the time of the inspection. Inspection of occupied homes presents some challenges as occupant belongings can obstruct visual inspection of and access to parts of the building. We do our best during inspection to work around belongings to discover as much as possible about the house without moving or damaging personal property, however, the presence of personal items does limit the inspection.

Grounds

General Grounds Photos

Drainage and Site

Clearance to Grade: Standard

Downspout Discharge: Above grade

Site Description: Flat

Driveways/Walkways/Flatwork

Driveway: Concrete, Gravel

Walkways: Concrete

Patios: Concrete

(G1-2) Repair:

Cracks were noted in walkway flatwork. No immediate repair appears necessary, though water will continue to deteriorate the surface until the walkway is repaired or replaced.

Grounds, Trees and Vegetation

Trees/Vegetation too near building: Yes - Prune Vegetation off House

(G1-3) Recommended Maintenance:

Pruning trees, branches and vegetation away from the house is recommended. Where trees, branches and large shrubs can provide rodent access to the roof, a minimum 6-foot clearance is recommended as many rodents can jump 6-feet. All vegetation, including smaller landscaping such as grasses, flowers and shrubs should be kept 1-foot off the house to eliminate contact which could trap moisture against the building.

Exterior Stairs

Exterior Stairs: Standard

(G1-4) Repair:

The step at the front porch exceeds 7-7.5". This could be a tripping hazard.

Fences

Exterior Fencing: Pool fence

(G1-5) Repair:

There are sections of fencing, around the pool that are loose. For safety reasons, repair is recommended.

Exterior Siding, Doors and Windows

Siding and Trim

Trim Material: Wood

Siding Material: Combed Cedar Shingles

This building is siding in places using a combed cedar shingle siding. This is a classic mid-century era siding that is typically installed with lots of shingle to the weather and in two layers, so there is usually a second layer of shingles behind the top layer. This is a high quality old wood siding system. Re-painting can sometimes be frustrating as peeling paint can be difficult to scrape off without damaging the combed appearance of the shingles.

Eaves

Plywood

Exterior Doors

Exterior Door Styles: Solid core, Glass panel doors

Exterior Window Frames

Window Frames: Vinyl

Decks, Porches and Balconies

Wood Decks Porches and Balconies

Present

To see a prescriptive guide for residential wood deck construction click this link:

Structure: Ground contact treated lumber

Ledger Board: Not visible

Guardrail: None needed

Decking Material: Wood.

Posts, Beams and Footings: Not Visible

Concrete Decks, Stoops, Landings and Porches

Concrete Structure: Concrete back porch

Roof, Chimney and Gutters

Roof Materials

Method of Roof Inspection: Ground

Roof Style: Gable

Flashings, Valleys and Penetrations: Present and Visually Standard

Roof flashings are used to keep a roofing system waterproof where the roofing material starts, stops, changes direction or is penetrated. During inspection, we look for standard flashing techniques that could be considered normal or standard in our region. Damaged, incomplete or non-standard flashings can be a sign of an older or less reliable roofing system and may require repair. Any non-standard flashings noted during inspection will be reported on below if found.

Roof Covering Materials: Architectural grade composition shingle

Approximate Age of Roof Covering: 5-10 Years

Overlay Roof: No

Chimneys

Present

Chimney Material: Masonry

(RCG-2) Repair:

Repairs are needed to the masonry chimney. The conditions noted here could increase the risk of moisture control problems related to the chimney. Neglecting maintenance on masonry chimneys can also lead to loose or damaged bricks and eventually a failing masonry system. Hire a licensed masonry contractor to further evaluate and repair the masonry chimney as recommended. Examples of observations noted during inspection include:

Chimney Caps

  • The chimney is missing a proper rain cap for moisture control
  • The chimney is missing a proper spark arrestor - these are important where wood burning fireplaces can allow embers to escape
(RCG-1) Recommended Maintenance:

The NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) recommends an annual inspection of all chimneys, fireplaces, solid fuel-burning appliances, and vents. They also recommend an NFPA 211 Standard, Level II inspection upon sale or transfer of the property. A Level II inspection includes, not only cleaning the interior of the chimney pipe, but also the use of specialized tools and testing procedures such as video cameras, etc. to thoroughly evaluate the serviceability of the entire flue lining and fireplace/chimney system. Level II inspections are not always needed, especially for short simple flues that can be inspected visually after a cleaning. If a chimney cleaning has not been performed over the past 12 months, such an inspection is recommended before the home changes ownership---for fire safety reasons. Implement any repairs as recommended.

Gutters and Downspouts

Gutter and Downspout Materials: Aluminum

(RCG-3) Repair:

Be sure that all downspouts are extended to drain as far away from the foundation as possible.

Fuel Storage and Distribution

Gas Meter

Present

Gas Shutoff Location: Front of the structure.

Electric Service

Electric Service Permits Found

These images show electric permits found during inspection.

Electric Service

Service Entrance: Above Ground

Meter Base Amperage: 200

Electric Service Equipment

Service Entrance (SE) conductor Size: Aluminum, 4/0, 200 amps

Main Panel Amperage: 200 amps

Electric Service Amperage: 200 amps

Main Electric Panel Location: Basement

Panel Manufacturer: Siemens

Electrical Grounding System

Grounding Rod Noted

Ground rod connections were noted at the exterior. The ground rods looked to be fully driven and connections looked standard,

Electrical Bonding System

Bonding Noted on Gas Pipes

Bonding connections were noted on the gas piping.

Electric Distribution and Finish Wiring

Branch Wiring

Wire Material: Copper

Wiring Method: Non-metallic sheathed cable

Receptacles and Fixtures

Inspection Method: Representative Testing

A representative number of receptacles and switches were tested during inspection. Any defects found during inspection are noted in this report. Only visible and accessible receptacles and switches were tested during inspection and personal items and furnishings are not moved to access any receptacles or fixtures.

Electric Receptacles: Three wire and two wire receptacles

(EDFW-2) Repair:

Hire a licensed electrician to eliminate all open grounds. This is a common condition in older buildings (prior to 1962) where three prong receptacles have been installed on an older two wire system. This creates a safety hazard as it is false advertising; appliances that rely on an equipment ground to discharge a fault can be plugged into ungrounded circuits. This disables the important safety feature of an equipment ground. Proper repair can include:

  • Running an equipment grounding conductor or a new three-wire circuit
  • Filling the third prong of the receptacle or restoring a two-prong receptacle or
  • Installing GFCI protection for this circuit and labeling the open ground receptacles

If GFCI protection is used, the outlets on this circuit should be labeled so it is clear they are ungrounded and GFCI protected. Examples of locations where open grounds were found include:

(EDFW-1) Note:

During inspection I test all Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) devices that are readily accessible. GFCI's are those electric receptacles with re-set buttons that you commonly see in bathrooms, kitchens and at the exterior of the home. GFCI's are important safety devices that limit the duration of electrical shocks and have demonstrably saved lives. I recommend being aware of where re-set buttons are located in the house as GFCI's can trip and disable a circuit which can not be re-energized without re-setting the button. I avoid testing to determine if a receptacle or circuit is GFCI protected if it is not clear where the re-set button can be found. This is because re-set buttons can be concealed behind stored items, so such a test risks disabling a circuit in the home. Occasionally, during testing of GFCI's one can fail. This is a statistical reality that some of these devices will fail under testing and require replacement after testing.

Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm Systems

CO Alarms Noted:On Main FloorOn 2nd FloorIn Basement

Smoke Alarms Noted:On Main FloorOn 2nd FloorIn All Bedrooms

Heating, Cooling, Fireplaces and Ventilation

Heating System

Energy Source: Natural gas

Heating Method: Gas forced air furnace

This house has a gas forced air furnace. A critical component to all combustion heating equipment is the heat exchanger. This is the welded metal assembly inside the furnace that contains the products of combustion so that moisture, carbon monoxide and other products of combustion do not mix with interior air and get safely vented to the exterior. Heat exchangers on modern furnaces have an average life expectancy of 15-20 years. Unfortunately, heat exchangers are concealed inside the heating equipment; they are not visible and specifically excluded from a home inspection. Cracks in heat exchangers may be concealed and can pose a potential safety hazard.

Manufacturer: York

Data Plate: Shown Here

This shows the data plate from the air handler. 📸

Capacity: 100,000 btu's

Age: 2010

Last Service Record: 7/2022


Vents and Flues

(HCFV-2) Repair:

The dryer vent, at the back of the home, has a cover, however, it needs some mesh to prevent insect nesting.

Air Filters

Filtration Systems: Disposable

The heating system has disposable air filters installed. These should be changed quarterly or more to ensure proper air flow at the furnace. Be sure to install the filters with the arrows pointing in the same direction as the air flow in the furnace.

Heating and Cooling Distribution Systems

Heat Source in Each Room: Present

Distribution Method: Forced Air / Ducts, Wall Mounted Forced Air Electric Heaters

Thermal images show approximate temperatures at heating registers. I use these images just to show the system was generally functioning during inspection. These are representative photos.

Mechanical Ventilation Systems

Bath Fan Ducting: Ductwork not visible

Determining proper ventilation to the exterior from kitchen, bath and laundry fans can be tricky as exhaust fan ductwork is often concealed behind finishes and fan terminations can be all over the house from the roof to the foundation, presenting difficulties for systematically checking every fan termination. During inspection, every effort is made to verify proper terminations of fan vents to the exterior, but it is possible to miss something here that is latent or concealed.

Kitchen Fan Ducting: Ducted to exterior

Solid Fuel Fireplaces

Fireplace Types: Masonry firebox

The wood burning fireplace has a flue damper up inside. This is designed to keep cold air out of the house when the fireplace is not in use. Be sure to keep the flue damper closed during the heating season when the fireplace is not in use to prevent heat loss.

(HCFV-4) Repair:

Missing mortar and loose brick were noted in the fireplace firebox. This can make the fireplace unsafe for fires. Hire a mason or chimney sweep to further evaluate this condition and repair as needed to ensure safe and reliable performance from the fireplace. Firebox repairs need to be made using firebrick and proper refractory mortars designed for high temperatures.

Plumbing

Water Meter

Not Found - Inquire With Seller

(P2-1) Due Diligence:

No water meter was found. This house seems to be on a public water system, which should have a metering device. Inquire with the seller or the utility as needed to locate the water meter.

Water Service Supply

Pipe Material: Galvanized

Water Supply: Public water

Water Pressure: Water Pressure Tested, 35 PSI

This shows the water pressure tested during inspection. Generally, "normal water pressure," should be between 30-80 PSI, though pressures near or below 30 can result in poor functional flow to fixtures. Water pressures in excess of 80 PSI risk damaging supply piping components and should be controlled with a pressure reducing valve.

Pressure Reducing Valve: None noted

Main Water Shut-off Location: Basement

(P2-2) Due Diligence:

The main water pipe from the street to the home appears to be done with old galvanized steel pipe. This pipe could require updating at any time. Evaluation of this pipe is beyond the scope of this inspection as the pipe is not visible. Keep this pipe in mind for updating should you do any other digging in the front of the home between the house and the water meter.

  • Please also note that when updating older metal pipes, there is a risk of disabling important grounding systems for your electrical service. During updates to older metal pipes, consider having your electrical grounding and bonding systems further investigated and repaired as recommended by a licensed electrical contractor.


Distribution Pipe

Supply Pipe Materials: Copper, Galvanized Steel

Copper water supply pipes were installed. Copper pipes installed prior to the late 1980's may be joined with solder that contains lead, which is a known health hazard especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained approximately 50% lead. Note that testing for toxic materials such as lead, is beyond the scope of this inspection. Consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions include:

  • Flush water taps or faucets. Do not drink water that has been sitting in the plumbing lines for more than 6 hours
  • Install appropriate filters at points of use
  • Use only cold water for cooking and drinking, as hot water dissolves lead more quickly than cold water
  • Treat well water to make it less corrosive
  • Have a qualified plumber replace supply pipes and/or plumbing components as necessary

Please note that when old galvanized steel pipe is eventually replaced, be sure to have the electrical bonding and grounding system evaluated and repaired / updated as needed by a licensed electrical contractor. It is common to update old metal piping using plastic piping. This can have the unintended consequence of disrupting important electrical grounding and bonding systems.

Functional Flow: Average

Circulation Pump: None Noted

Waste Pipe and Discharge

Discharge Type: Public Sewer - Buyer

Waste and Vent Pipe Materials: ABS plastic

(P2-3) Due Diligence:

A video camera sewer scope is recommended. An evaluation of the sewer line below the ground is beyond the scope of this inspection. Due to the age and location of the building, a sewer scope is recommended to further evaluate the sewer line and the below ground connections between the house and the municipal sewer line. Sewer scopes are done using video cameras and can reveal the materials, condition and reliability of the sewer line. If that has been done recently, I recommend having a sewer scope performed.

Water Heater

System Type: Tank

Manufacturer: Bradford-White

Data Plate: Shown Here

This shows the data plate for this water heater.

Size: 50 gal

Age: Bradford White (N = 2016)

Energy Source: Gas

Straps : Present

Expansion Tank: Present

Relief Valve: Present - Not Tested

The temperature and pressure relief valve is arguably one of the most important safety devices in your house. Should the thermostats fail inside your water heater, this allows excess pressure to "blow off," which will prevent catastrophic build up of temperature and pressure which can make water heaters explosive. I do not test the "blow off valve" during inspection as there is a risk it could stick open and testing could cause the need for a repair. It is recommended that these be inspected annually; I would at least ask for a plumber to test the device every time I had a plumber out for any other job.

Water Temperature

Water Temperature Measured During Inspection: Testing Note, 148 Degrees F

The water temperature was tested multiple times during inspection. It is common for water temperatures to fluctuate throughout the house depending on the distance from the water heater, the water heater settings, the type of water heater and any thermostatic controls used in the plumbing fixtures and mixing valves. For reporting, the median temperature is used.

(P2-4) Repair:

Testing of the plumbing system today, I noted the water was too hot - 148 degrees F. This is a scald hazard. To prevent scalding, standards recommend indoor hot water temperatures do not exceed 120 degrees. There is some evidence that hot water temperatures should be greater than 130 degrees to prevent Legionaries' disease from developing in the water heater. If this is a concern, you can heat the water in the tank to 140 degrees F and have a tempering valve installed at the hot water tank. Have this further evaluated and repaired by a licensed plumber or simply turn down the temperature as desired to eliminate a scald hazard.

Exterior Hose Bibs

Update to Frost Free

(P2-6) Repair:

The exterior hose bib(s) are being controlled by a valve near the water shut in the basement. I believe that this is due to the fact that the bib at the front, has a stripped handle. I recommend having a plumbing contractor make all needed repair to include the updating of the bibs.

(P2-5) Improve:

Older hose bibs were noted on this building. Updating the hose bibs is recommended. Modern hose bibs are typically "frost free," which are (arguably) more resistant to bursting in cold weather. They also have important vacuum breakers installed which can prevent water from your hoses backing into your water supply system. In the meantime, be sure to winterize your hose bibs during cold weather to prevent from freezing and consider adding a vacuum breaker to the end of the hose bib. The following video shows a vacuum breaker. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1vu_YMPPM2M

Additional Plumbing

Swimming Pools

(AP-1) Due Diligence:

Swimming pools are not within the scope of a residential home inspection and they are beyond the scope of this inspection. Still, there are general minimal rules that should be followed to provide safe conditions at these areas since these areas can be dangerous for children and adults.


Limit Access for Safety: Though not required in all jurisdictions, pools should be completely surrounded by fencing material at least 4 feet in height. A slatted fence should have gaps no wider that 4 inches so kids can’t squeeze through. The gap at the bottom should be less than 2 inches, unless over concrete where is should be less than 4 inches. Gates should be of the self-closing and self-latching type. The latch should be out of a child’s reach.

It is also recommended to install alarms. If the house serves as one of the walls of the pool enclosure, any door leading to the pool area should be protected with an alarm. In addition, consideration of an underwater pool alarm that sounds when something hits the water and is audible at the house interior is recommended. Pools covers may be permitted by some jurisdictions, but they don’t provide the passive protection that other alarm features may provide.


Wiring Safety: Pools have electrical connections to pumps, heaters and lighting systems. All pool wiring is required to be GFCI protected and all metal in or around the pool is required to be bonded. These systems can be nearly impossible to verify. However, having a full evaluation of the pool wiring by a qualified electrical contractor is recommended, especially during a real estate transaction.


It is recommended that this pool and the related equipment and electrical systems be inspected for operation and safety by a pool specialist. 

Interior

General Interior Photos

Floors and Floor Materials

Floor Settlement: None noted

Walls, Ceilings, Trim, Hallways and Closets

Wall and Ceiling Materials: Drywall

Wall Insulation and Air Bypass

Wall Insulation: Not Visible

Stairs and Railings

Non-standard, Handrail (No Wall Returns)

(I-2) Repair:

The ends of the hand rail should return into the wall to prevent clothing or accessories from catching on the end of the railing and creating a trip hazard.

Interior Doors

Interior Doors: Hollow Core

Windows

Window Glazing: Double pane

Interior Window Frame: Vinyl

Window Styles: Casement, Sliding, Single hung

(I-3) Improve:

Some of the bedrooms in this house have older / missing escape and rescue openings - see the second floor bedroom's. Today, all bedrooms must have a second means of ingress and egress in case of emergency. This can be provided by a door but is typically provided by a window. Updating is recommended for improved safety, though updating is not a requirement. Unless there is a personal desire for these modern standards sooner, the logical time to improve this is during the next window replacement / updating.


Modern escape and rescue openings must comply with these basic guidelines:

  • Minimum width of opening: 20 inches
  • Minimum height of opening: 24 inches
  • Minimum net clear opening at any grade floor level escape and rescue window: 5 square feet
  • Minimum net clear opening of other escape and rescue windows: 5.7 square feet
  • Maximum height of base of opening above interior side floor: 44 inches
  • Windows should open easily without the use of keys or tools

And for window wells below grade:

  • Minimum net clear area of 9 square feet
  • Minimum horizontal projection and width of 36 inches
  • Wells with a vertical depth greater than 44 inches require a permanent ladder or steps usable with the window in the fully open position

Kitchen

General Kitchen Photos

Sinks and Faucets

Tested

Cabinets and Countertops

Countertop Material: Slab Surface

Cabinet Material: Wood

(K-2) Repair:

The slab surface countertop is cracked and requires repair or replacement. Consult with a slab granite installer about options for repair. Please note that proper repair could necessitate countertop replacement, a significant expense. Temporary repairs can often be made with sealants, though this is obviously less cosmetically appealing.

Disposers

Disposer: Operated

Dishwasher

Dishwasher: Operated

Dishwasher Air Gap: None noted

(K-3) Repair:

An air gap is recommended to protect the dishwasher from accidental contamination if the sewer line were to back up. If an air gap cannot be installed, at least run the drain line above the level of the sink drain to create a high loop. This was an older way of protecting the dishwasher. Hire a licensed plumber to install an air gap.

Ventilation Method

Fan Ducted to Exterior

Ranges, Ovens and Cooktops

Range/ Oven /Cook-tops: Gas

(K-4) Repair:

I was only able to get the right 2 burners to ignite. The middle and left burners did not light. Have a small appliance technician assess and make any needed repair.

Refrigerators

Refrigerator: Operating

Thermal images show the freezer and refrigerator working during inspection.

General Kitchen Condition

Standard

Laundry Facilities

Laundry Photos

Washer

Tested

During inspection I try and run the clothes washing machine. This is mostly so that I can push water down the drain to test the waste piping system. Running the clothes washer during an inspection is not a reliable test of the appliance. I am not actually doing a load of laundry, so please note the limitations of this test.

(LF-2) Improve:

A moisture alarm with water shut-off features is recommended under the washing machine to protect against accidental leaks in the supply hoses. Pans can be effective when there is a drain, but even these will not protect against a burst supply connector. A moisture alarm with automatic shut-off will. Watts is a brand I have seen installed: Link.

Dryer

Tested

Proper dryer exhaust venting is critical for safe and reliable performance from the dryer. Here are some basic rules of thumb for dryer exhaust duct installation: Unless a vent-free appliance is being used, the dryer exhaust vent must terminate outdoors. It should be no more than 25 feet long and for every 90 degree turn subtract 5 feet and for every 45 degree bend subtract 2.5 feet. Use only smooth-wall metal vent pipe @ 4 inch pipe diameter. Do not use plastic pipe and plastic flex pipe. If a flexible connector is needed behind the dryer use a short amount of corrugated metal pipe. If the exhaust duct is getting pinched behind dryer, consider use of a dryer vent box, pictured here. Flex and corrugated pipes should never be used in concealed spaces such as through walls or in attic or crawl spaces. Insulate dryer exhaust duct where it passes through unconditioned spaces to prevent condensation that could hasten lint build-up inside the pipe. Do not use screws to connect pipe as these can trap lint. Secure duct with foil tape as needed. Be sure duct is sleeved properly so that it will not trap lint and clean the vent regularly, especially if it is a long exhaust run.

Power Source: Electric

Exhaust Duct: Ducted to Exterior

Powder Bathroom

General Bathroom Photos

Sinks and Cabinets

Tested

Toilet

Tested

Bathroom Ventilation

Type: Bath fan

General Bath Condition

Standard

Family Bathroom

General Bathroom Photos


Sinks and Cabinets

Tested

Toilet

Tested

Bathtub / Shower

Tested

Bathroom Ventilation

Type: Bath fan, Operable window

General Bath Condition

Standard

Main Bathroom

General Bathroom Photos

Sinks and Cabinets

Tested

(MB1-2) Repair:

The hot water handle at the left sink was loose at the basin. Repair is needed.

Toilet

Tested

Bathtub / Shower

Tested

(MB1-4) Repair:

The right shower handle is leaking where the hose connects to the shower head.

(MB1-5) Repair:

The button that controls the jets, is loose.

(MB1-6) Recommended Maintenance:

The jetted tub was filled and tested during inspection today. The jets performed well but algae was noted in the jets that contaminated the tub water during testing. Cleaning of the jets is needed to prevent this from happening.

(MB1-3) Note:

The jetted tub in the main bath was filled and tested during inspection today.


Bathroom Ventilation

Type: Bath fan

General Bath Condition

Standard

Basement Bathroom

General Bathroom Photos

Sinks and Cabinets

Tested

Toilet

Tested

Bathtub / Shower

Tested

(GB2-2) Repair:

The basement bath shower diverter, which diverts water from the tub fill spigot to the shower head, is leaky and requires repair to prevent wasting water and to improve flow to the shower head.

Bathroom Ventilation

Type: Bath fan, Operable window

General Bath Condition

Standard

Attic

Attic Access

Viewed at access

There is no ramp or safe way to access the attic space. Crawling through insulation and on top of framing risks damaging thermal barriers and ceiling finishes and is not a safe way to access an attic. This limited inspection of this space.

Roof Framing and Sheathing

Rafters: 2x6

Sheathing: Not visible

Attic Insulation

Insulation Type: Fiberglass

Approximate Insulation R-Value on Attic Ceiling: 30

(A-2) Repair:

The insulation in the attic area has been installed in between the rafters and against the roof deck. This can lead to trapped moisture. In this age of home, typically, the interior attic walls are insulated and not the roof. I recommend having an insulation contractor assess and make any needed repair.

Attic and Roof Cavity Ventilation

Attic Ventilation Method: Ridge vents

Crawl Space

General Crawl Space

Crawl Space: Present

(CS-1) Repair:

Overall, numerous repairs are needed to the crawl space below this house. I have made a series of detailed observations in this observations but given the extent of repairs I recommend further evaluation of this crawl space by a licensed general contractor who specializes in crawl space clean-up as additional repairs could be needed that are latent or concealed.

Examples of Observations Noted During Inspection Include:

  • The crawl space access hatch is rotting and requires repair or replacement
  • The access hatch for the crawl space does not look rodent proof.
  • The sub-floor insulation is rodent-damaged and requires repair and replacement

Crawl Space Access

Method of Inspection: Viewed at access

Vapor Barrier

Vapor Barrier Material: Plastic on earth

Crawl Space Ventilation

Ventilation Method: Exterior wall vents

Posts and Footings

Standard

Insulation

Insulation Type: Fiberglass

Approximate R-Value: R-19

Moisture Conditions

No water was visible or present at the time of inspection

Structure and Basement

Foundation

% of Foundation Not Visible: 70%

Evidence of Seismic Protection: None Found - Old House

Building Configuration: Basement, Crawl space

Foundation Description: Poured concrete

(SB-1) Improve:

As always with older homes steps can be taken to improve the seismic stability of this home. Improvements include bolting the home to the foundation, adding sheer panels to pony walls and installing positive connections between posts and beams and posts and footings. Consult with a licensed general contractor or company specializing in seismic retrofits to further evaluate and improve the structure.

Floor, Wall and Ceiling Framing

Wall Framing: Not visible

Wall Sheathing: Not visible

Floor Framing: Partly visible

Sub-Floor Material: Not visible

Ceiling Framing: 2x6

Basement

Full

Basement Moisture

None noted

Checking Out Procedure

Check Out List

Oven:Off

Lights:Off

Heating and Cooling:Restored to Pre-inspection temperatures

Appliances:Off / finishing cycle

Receipt -- 📃 The Complete Inspection Report

Report # 220811B
Inspection Date: 2022-08-11

Property inspected for:
John Bonham
Somewhere in Milton WA

Inspection Fee$600.00
$600.00
PAID

South Sound Inspection
C/O Robert Jones
4227 South Meridian

Puyallup, WA 98373
253-820-9650

Signed Contracts