ICN#: 10033AP0048

Overview

This home is from an older era of construction and it has been updated many times over the years. Most of the updating appears to have been using good construction practices and safely. There are however, some older systems such as methods of wiring, framing and construction that will require monitoring and repairs over time. The anobiid beetle activity and rodent presence is a health and safety concern and should be dealt with immediately.

The Scope and Purpose of a Home Inspection

Purchasing property involves risk

The purpose of a home inspection is to help reduce the risk associated with the purchase of a structure by providing a professional opinion about the overall condition of the structure. A home inspection is a limited visual inspection and it cannot eliminate this risk. Some homes present more risks than others. We cannot control this, but we try to help educate you about what we don’t know during the inspection process. This is more difficult to convey in a report and one of many reasons why we recommend that you attend the inspection.

A home inspection is not an insurance policy

This report does not substitute for or serve as a warranty or guarantee of any kind. Home warranties can be purchased separately from insuring firms that provide this service.

A home inspection is visual and not destructive

The descriptions and observations in this report are based on a visual inspection of the structure. We inspect the aspects of the structure that can be viewed without dismantling, damaging or disfiguring the structure and without moving furniture and interior furnishings. Areas that are concealed, hidden or inaccessible to view are not covered by this inspection. Some systems cannot be tested during this inspection as testing risks damaging the building. For example, overflow drains on bathtubs are generally not tested because if they were found to be leaking they could damage the finishes below. Our procedures involve non-invasive investigation and non-destructive testing which will limit the scope of the inspection.

This is not an inspection for code compliance

This inspection and report are not intended for city / local code compliance. During the construction process structures are inspected for code compliance by municipal inspectors. Framing is open at this time and conditions can be fully viewed. Framing is not open during inspections of finished homes, and this limits the inspection. All houses fall out of code compliance shortly after they are built, as the codes continually change. National codes are augmented at least every three years for all of the varying disciplines. Municipalities can choose to adopt and phase in sections of the codes on their own timetables. There are generally no requirements to bring older homes into compliance unless substantial renovation is being done.

This is just our opinion

Construction techniques and standards vary. There is no one way to build a house or install a system in a house. The observations in this report are the opinions of the home inspector. Other inspectors and contractors are likely to have some differing opinions. You are welcome to seek opinions from other professionals.

The scope of this inspection

This inspection will include the following systems: exterior, roof, structure, drainage, foundation, attic, interior, plumbing, electrical and heating. The evaluation will be based on limited observations that are primarily visual and non-invasive. This inspection and report are not intended to be technically exhaustive.For more about the scope of a home inspection see: ASHI National Standards at http://www.aareihome.com/standards.pdf or Washington State Home Inspection Standards at http://app.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=18.280.030

Your expectations

The overall goal of a home inspection is to help insure that your expectations are appropriate with the house you are proposing to buy. To this end we assist with discovery by showing and documenting observations during the home inspection. This should not be mistaken for a technically exhaustive inspection designed to uncover every defect with a building. Such inspections are available but they are generally cost-prohibitive to most homebuyers.

Your participation is requested

Your presence is requested during this inspection. A written report will not substitute for all the possible information that can be conveyed verbally by a shared visual observation of the conditions of the property.

How to Read This Report

Getting the Information to You

This report is designed to deliver important and technical information in a way that is easy for anyone to access and understand. If you are in a hurry, you can take a “Quick Look” at our summary page and quickly get critical information for important decision making. However, we strongly recommend that you take the time to read the full Report, which includes digital photographs, captions, diagrams, videos and hot links to additional information.

The best way to get the layers of information that are presented in this report is to read your report online. This will allow all you to expand your learning about your house. You will notice some words or series of words highlighted in blue and underlined – clicking on these will provide you with a link to additional information.

This report can also be printed on paper or to a PDF document.

Chapters and Sections

This report is divided into chapters that parcel the home into logical inspection components. Each chapter is broken into sections that relate to a specific system or component of the home. You can navigate between chapters with the click of a button on the left side margin.

Most sections will contain some descriptive information done in black font. Observation narrative, done in colored boxes, will be included if a system or component is found to be significantly deficient in some way or if we wish to provide helpful additional information about the system or the scope of our inspection. If a system or component of the home was deemed to be in satisfactory or serviceable condition, there may be no narrative observation comments in that section.

Observation Labels

All narrative observations are colored, numbered and labeled to help you find, refer to, and understand the severity of the observation. Observation colors and labels used in this report are:

  • Major Concern:
    Repair items that may cost significant money to correct now or in the near future, or items that require immediate attention to prevent additional damage or eliminate safety hazards.
  • Repair
    Repair and maintenance items noted during inspection. Please note that some repair items can be expensive to correct such as re-finishing hardwood floors, but are considered simply repair items due to their cosmetic nature.
  • Improve
    Observations that are not necessarily defects, but which could be improved for safety, efficiency, or reliability reasons.
  • Monitor
    Items that should be watched to see if correction may be needed in the future.
  • Due Diligence
    Observation such as a buried oil tank that may require further investigation to determine the severity and / or urgency of repair.
  • Future Project
    A repair that may be deferred for some time but should be on the radar for repair or replacement in the near future.
  • Efficiency
    Denotes observations that are needed to make the home more energy efficient as well as to bring the home up to modern insulation standards. This category typically includes windows and insulation. Other items, such as lighting and appliances, are not inspected for their energy status.
  • Notes and Limitations
    Refers to aside information and /or any comments elaborating on descriptions of systems in the home or limitations to the home inspection.
  • WDO
    Denotes the presence of wood destroying organisms or conditions conducive to wood destroying organisms. Conducive conditions include but are not limited to, inadequate clearances, earth/wood contact, cellulose debris, inadequate ventilation, and excessive moisture. All observations with WDO are relevant to a WA State pest inspection.

Wood Destroying

This report includes a structural pest inspection embedded within the report. All observations in this report that begin with WDO are a part of a WA State Pest Inspection. Rainshadow Home Inspection employs James Lagergren, Licensed Structural Pest Inspector # 94987. Please note that most WDO observations are related to high moisture conditions that could be conducive to mold-like substances. Rainshadow Home Inspection is not a mold specialist and recommends consulting with an industrial hygienist or other mold remediation expert if concerned about mold or indoor air quality. Pest Inspection Standards in WA State - WAC 16-228-2045 - REQUIRES THAT A DIAGRAM / DRAWING BE PREPARED FOR WOOD DESTROYING ORGANISM (WDO) REPORTS. IF THE PHOTOS AND DESCRIPTIONS IN THIS REPORT ARE INADEQUATE, A DRAWING IS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.

Further Evaluation

Whenever further evaluation of a system or component is recommended or whenever due diligence is recommended, this further evaluation or investigation should be done by at least one licensed professional and qualified contractor prior to closing as there is a chance of hidden costs or problems associated with the system or component in question.

Summary Page

The Summary Page is designed as a bulleted overview of all the observations noted during inspection. This helpful overview is not a substitution for reading the entire inspection report. The entire report must be read to get a complete understanding of this inspection report as the Summary Page does not include photographs or photo captions.

Quick Look

Major Concerns

  • (SB-1) Structure and Basement:

    (SB-1) Major Concern (WDO): This home is resting on a humble old foundation that is post and pier. Multiple structural red flags were noted during inspection that indicate repairs are needed to stabilize the home and prevent on-going settlement. Overall, post and pier foundations are more prone to settlement and seismic damage and they are nearly impossible to rodent roof. I recommend hiring a qualified general contractor to further evaluate this foundation and floor frame and implement repairs as recommended to stabilize the structure and prevent on-going settlement. Some of the urgent items include:

  • (I-2) Interior:

    (I-2) Major Concern: Rodent feces were noted inside the house today indicating that extensive rodent seal up and clean up work is needed. Hire a rodent control operator to further evaluate and repair.

Repairs

  • (PWDO-1) Pests and Wood Destroying Organisms:

    (PWDO-1) Repair: Rodent entry points were noted. These need to be sealed to prevent rodent entry. I also saw 3 rats while crawling. A rodent specialist should be contacted to adequately seal this post and pier home from rodent entry. The rodent proofing would be improved by trimming back the board and batten siding and installing fiber cement skirting - this would also reduce a pest conducive condition for anobiids.

  • (PWDO-2) Pests and Wood Destroying Organisms:

    (PWDO-2) Repair: The smell of rodent urine and feces in the shop attic was so overwhelming that I was unable to inspect the area. I also noted rodent holes and chewing in the main room. This should be an area examined by a rodent specialist in conjunction with the house.

  • (PWDO-3) Pests and Wood Destroying Organisms:

    (PWDO-3) Repair (WDO): Understanding Anobiid Beetles and associated damage to wood: Anobiid beetles are a wood destroying organism that can significantly damage softwood. These beetles damage wood as larva emerge from infested wood. Anobiids can re-infest at any time and they favor wood with a moisture content of 13-20%. Organic control of anobiids is to implement maintenance and repairs as needed to remove damaged wood and keep wood as dry as possible. Crawl spaces below houses need to be kept properly ventilated and dry. Anobiids on exterior wood can be more complicated to control and typically require replacement of infested wood. Chemical of control can be effective but is expensive to do well and chemical control will not correct damaged wood.

    The anobiid damage to the home is throughout the perimeter of the building and the crawl space.

  • (CS-1) Crawl Space:

    (CS-1) Repair (WDO): Part of the crawl space could not be accessed during inspection. This area needs to be improved so that the entire crawl area can be inspected. Unfortunately this is probably not possible due to the post and pier construction. The area that I couldn't access was on the road side of the home under the laundry room.

  • (CS-2) Crawl Space:

    (CS-2) Repair (WDO): The plastic vapor barrier in the crawl space is incomplete. Use 6 mil black plastic to cover all exposed earth. This helps to reduce humidity and eliminate conducive pest conditions in the crawl space.

  • (E-1) Electrical:

    (E-1) Repair: This home still appears to employ some knob and tube wiring. This is an old soldered style of wiring that would not meet today's standards. Some insurance companies will not insure homes with this type of wiring. During testing today I noted several ungrounded outlets as well as a few knob and tube circuits. I recommend consulting with a licensed electrician about ways to improve this system and take pressure off existing knob and tube. Installation of additional circuits and of arc fault protected breakers can help make the system safer and more reliable. Complete removal and replacement of all knob and tube is recommended but considerably more expensive and not always necessary. Many homes of this age in this area still employ at least a few knob and tube circuits. You need to update to a level you feel comfortable with.

  • (E-2) Electrical:

    (E-2) Repair: Multiple open electrical junction boxes were noted in the crawl space and one in the home above the closet - they need to be covered for improved safety.

  • (E-3) Electrical:

    (E-3) Repair: The non-metallic sheathed cable is poorly supported and requires staples or hangers for additional support. This type of wiring should be supported every 4 feet and within 2 feet of junction boxes.

  • (E-4) Electrical:

    (E-4) Repair: The wiring to the water heater is not protected from physical damage and is a potential safety hazard. Have this wiring further evaluated and repaired by a licensed electrician.

  • (E-5) Electrical:

    (E-5) Repair: The use of GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interruption) protection is inconsistent with modern minimum standards for safety. GFCI protection is recommended for the electrical receptacles in the following locations: all kitchen countertops, bathrooms, exterior, garage, unfinished basement, laundry and all wet and damp locations. GFCI's protect against electrocution by limiting the duration of an electrical shock. These are an important modern safety feature. Hire a licensed electrician to further evaluate and update this home's system for improved safety. I noted missing GFCIs in the kitchen.

  • (E-6) Electrical:

    (E-6) Repair: The bathroom lighting circuit was noted to be flickering during operation, suggesting that repair could be needed to the wiring to insure safe and reliable performance. Have this further investigated by a licensed electrician.

  • (FSD-2) Fuel Storage and Distribution:

    (FSD-2) Repair: The gas piping at the exterior of the building is corroding and appears to have inadequate protection from rust-inhibitive paint. To insure reliable performance, I recommend painting with rust inhibitive paint.

  • (P-2) Plumbing:

    (P-2) Repair: The supply piping here is a hodge podge of different patches and partial updates using a variety of different supply piping materials. The system was generally functional at the time of inspection but could require repairs at any time. A cohesive supply piping update is recommended for improved reliability. Observations noted during inspection include:

  • (P-5) Plumbing:

    (P-5) Repair: Install listed seismic straps to support the water heater in the event of an earthquake - plumber's tape is not considered an adequate support. Two listed seismic straps are recommended one for the top 1/3rd and one for the bottom 1/3rd of the tank.

  • (P-7) Plumbing:

    (P-7) Repair: The dryer exhaust duct termination at the exterior of the building is covered with a screen. This is a safety hazard that could block lint and cause a fire. The dryer has a baffle making the screen unnecessary.

  • (P-8) Plumbing:

    (P-8) Repair: Foil dryer exhaust duct was noted in use to connect the dryer to the rigid vent. This product is not recommended as it has proven to be unreliable and a potential fire hazard. A corrugated metal flex duct is recommended.

  • (I-1) Interior:

    (I-1) Repair: Settlement was noted in the floor frame system during inspection today. This is to be expected in a home with a post and pier foundation and poorly compacted soils.

  • (I-3) Interior:

    (I-3) Repair: The screens for some of the windows are damaged and require replacement.

  • (I-4) Interior:

    (I-4) Repair: The old wood windows in the master bedroom are painted shut and not operational. This is an issue with egress and means of escape and the windows should be made operational.

  • (RA-2) Roof/Attic:

    (RA-2) Repair: The downspouts to the home are missing splash blocks to help divert water away from the pier system. This is a pest conducive condition and splash blocks should be added to improve drainage.

  • (RA-3) Roof/Attic:

    (RA-3) Repair: The shop gutters are clogged with organic debris and require cleaning, there is also damage to the gutter and fascia on the west side of the building. Clean the gutters and insure they are unobstructed, leak free and properly sloped to drain.

  • (RA-4) Roof/Attic:

    (RA-4) Repair: The disconnected downspout at the south end of the shop requires immediate repair to prevent water damage to the side of the building.

  • (EG-2) Exterior/Garage:

    (EG-2) Repair: Localized wood decay was noted at the rafter tails where they stick out past the roofline. I recommend building metal caps for these to better protect the wood and / or cutting away the rotted wood.

  • (EG-3) Exterior/Garage:

    (EG-3) Repair: The deck posts appear to be settling in places - see how the deck is not level. During repairs to the decking system have the posts and footings further evaluated and repaired by a licensed contractor.

  • (EG-4) Exterior/Garage:

    (EG-4) Repair: The nails used in the joist hangers and attachments for the deck appear to be the wrong type of fastener - these may be wood screws. Teco nails are the proper nails to use for joist hangers and these should be double hot dipped galvanized or better to resist corrosion. I noted some corrosion on some of these screws. Have this further investigated and repaired as recommended by a qualified general contractor to insure reliable fastening of the hangers. The use of fasteners in these connectors is inconsistent with manufacturer specifications for proper installation.

  • (EG-5) Exterior/Garage:

    (EG-5) Repair: The decking on this deck has been painted and is very exposed to the weather. This will allow water to penetrate the wood and can hasten the deterioration process. Localized soft spots were found, but there appears to be some useful remaining service life. I recommend replacing this decking in the near term for safety and reliability. Please note that some of the structure of the deck is treated lumber and should be re-usable.

  • (G-1) Grounds:

    (G-1) Repair: Eliminate siding /soil contact to reduce the chances for rot and pest damage and repair any hidden rot as needed. Generally, a 6 inch clearance between soils and wood is recommended. This is often not realistic on older buildings, but repairs should be made to get as much clearance as is possible and all contact must be eliminated. One trick where clearances are close is to remove soils and back-fill with gravel - the gravel will not hold water and will help keep the base of the siding dry. Still try and keep gravel below the level of the siding.

  • (G-3) Grounds:

    (G-3) Repair: Typical cracks were noted in the concrete walkway along the steps. No immediate repair appears necessary, though water will continue to deteriorate the surface until the crack is repaired or replaced.

  • (G-4) Grounds:

    (G-4) Repair: A guardrail is needed for the exterior stairs. All stairs greater than three steps should have a guardrail with openings no larger than 4 inches. Hire a licensed general contractor to further evaluate and repair. The stairs also show signs of moderate settlement.

  • (G-5) Grounds:

    (G-5) Repair: Localized rot was noted in the stairs handrail for the front stairs.

Improves

  • (PWDO-4) Pests and Wood Destroying Organisms:

    (PWDO-4) Improve (WDO): Localized wood decay fungi was noted in wood stacked next to home on the left exterior wall - I assume it is there to help rodent proof the crawl space. This should be removed.

  • (E-7) Electrical:

    (E-7) Improve: The cracked electrical cover plate should be replaced - see shop.

  • (P-4) Plumbing:

    (P-4) Improve: The waste pipe venting system is not correctly terminated above the roof - I noted an air admittance or "cheater" valve installed behind a grille in the laundry room. This could allow sewer gas to enter the home. This is a safety hazard. Repair by correctly running this vent above the roof.

  • (P-6) Plumbing:

    (P-6) Improve: Testing of the plumbing system today, I noted the water was hot - 123 degrees. This is a scald hazard. To prevent scalding, standards recommend indoor hot water temperatures do not exceed 120 degrees. There is some evidence that hot water temperatures should be greater than 130 degrees to prevent Legionaries' disease from developing in the water heater. If this is a concern, have a tempering valve installed at the hot water tank. Have this further evaluated and repaired by a licensed plumber or simply turn down the temperature as desired to eliminate a scald hazard.

  • (EG-6) Exterior/Garage:

    (EG-6) Improve: The automatic garage door opener on the right side in the shop is an older model that is not equipped with laser eyes for use as a safety feature. These are less safe than modern openers which will reverse when the laser beam is broken. Updating this opener is recommended for improved safety.

Due Diligences

  • (P-3) Plumbing:

    (P-3) Due Diligence: This home's sewage appears to employ an on-site private septic system. Please note that an evaluation of this system is beyond the scope of this inspection. I recommend having this system further evaluated by a septic specialist.

  • (K-2) Kitchen:

    (K-2) Due Diligence: The dishwasher appears to have an air gap installed. Inquire with the seller as to why this was installed inside the cabinet and not accessible? I operated the dishwasher but there is the chance of concealed damage and lack of access in the future to consider.

  • (RA-1) Roof/Attic:

    (RA-1) Due Diligence: The roofing material on this building appears to be a recently installed dimensional or architectural grade shingle. These are often rated as 30-year shingles. In practice, as a roof assembly, I find these last closer to 18-22 years depending on the quality of the installation, the steepness of the roof and the amount of exposure. The installation appears neat and professional. Inquire with the seller about any warranty information for this roof. Many professional roofing companies will offer limited workmanship warranties.

  • (G-2) Grounds:

    (G-2) Due Diligence: The poured concrete bulkhead has cracked and settled. This requires repair for a proper function and is outside the scope of a home inspection. I recommend contacting a professional engineer for further evaluation.

Notes

  • (FSD-1) Fuel Storage and Distribution:

    (FSD-1) Note: Tanks must be refilled before they run empty, if not they will need to be tested and this is expensive. Each tank showed 80% full.

  • (P-1) Plumbing:

    (P-1) Note: Water shut off

  • (EG-1) Exterior/Garage:

    (EG-1) Note: Localized rot repairs are needed to the exterior siding. Hire a licensed general contractor to further evaluate and repair all exterior siding and trim as needed. See grading recommendations.

Structure and Basement

Foundation

% of Foundation Not Visible 0%

Evidence of Seismic Protection None noted

Building Configuration Crawl space

Foundation Description Post and pier

(SB-1) Major Concern (WDO): This home is resting on a humble old foundation that is post and pier. Multiple structural red flags were noted during inspection that indicate repairs are needed to stabilize the home and prevent on-going settlement. Overall, post and pier foundations are more prone to settlement and seismic damage and they are nearly impossible to rodent roof. I recommend hiring a qualified general contractor to further evaluate this foundation and floor frame and implement repairs as recommended to stabilize the structure and prevent on-going settlement. Some of the urgent items include:

Floor, Wall and Ceiling Framing

Wall Framing Not visible

Wall Insulation Not visible

Wall Sheathing Not visible

Floor Framing 2x6

Sub-Floor Material Not visible

Ceiling Framing Not visible

Pests and Wood Destroying Organisms

Pests and Rodents

Present

(PWDO-1) Repair: Rodent entry points were noted. These need to be sealed to prevent rodent entry. I also saw 3 rats while crawling. A rodent specialist should be contacted to adequately seal this post and pier home from rodent entry. The rodent proofing would be improved by trimming back the board and batten siding and installing fiber cement skirting - this would also reduce a pest conducive condition for anobiids.

(PWDO-2) Repair: The smell of rodent urine and feces in the shop attic was so overwhelming that I was unable to inspect the area. I also noted rodent holes and chewing in the main room. This should be an area examined by a rodent specialist in conjunction with the house.

Wood Destroying Organisms

Visible Evidence of Active Wood Destroying Insects Present

Visible Evidence of Inactive Wood Destroying Insects Present

Visible Evidence of Active Wood Decay and Fungi Present

Visible Evidence of Damage from Wood Destroying Organisms Present

Visible Evidence of Conditions Conducive to Wood Destroying Organisms Present

(PWDO-3) Repair (WDO): Understanding Anobiid Beetles and associated damage to wood: Anobiid beetles are a wood destroying organism that can significantly damage softwood. These beetles damage wood as larva emerge from infested wood. Anobiids can re-infest at any time and they favor wood with a moisture content of 13-20%. Organic control of anobiids is to implement maintenance and repairs as needed to remove damaged wood and keep wood as dry as possible. Crawl spaces below houses need to be kept properly ventilated and dry. Anobiids on exterior wood can be more complicated to control and typically require replacement of infested wood. Chemical of control can be effective but is expensive to do well and chemical control will not correct damaged wood.

The anobiid damage to the home is throughout the perimeter of the building and the crawl space.

(PWDO-4) Improve (WDO): Localized wood decay fungi was noted in wood stacked next to home on the left exterior wall - I assume it is there to help rodent proof the crawl space. This should be removed.

Crawl Space

Crawl Space Access

Method of Inspection Crawled, but access was limited

(CS-1) Repair (WDO): Part of the crawl space could not be accessed during inspection. This area needs to be improved so that the entire crawl area can be inspected. Unfortunately this is probably not possible due to the post and pier construction. The area that I couldn't access was on the road side of the home under the laundry room.

Vapor Barrier

Vapor Barrier Material Plastic

(CS-2) Repair (WDO): The plastic vapor barrier in the crawl space is incomplete. Use 6 mil black plastic to cover all exposed earth. This helps to reduce humidity and eliminate conducive pest conditions in the crawl space.

Crawl Space Ventilation

Ventilation Method None noted

Posts and Footings

Non-standard

Insulation

Insulation Type Spray foam

Approximate R-Value R-30

Moisture Conditions

Present

Electrical

Service Equipment

Volts 120/240

Service Drop Overhead

Meter Base Amperage 200

Service Entrance (SE) conductor Size (2) Aluminum, #2, 100 amps

Main Panel Amperage 200 amps

Electric Service Amperage 200 amps

Main Electric Panel Location Utility room

Shop Service

Volts 120/240

Service Drop Overhead

Meter Base Amperage 200

Service Entrance (SE) conductor Size (2) Aluminum, #2, 100 amps

Main Panel Amperage 200 amps

Electric Service Amperage 200 amps

Main Electric Panel Location South end of shop

Sub Panels

Sub-panel Main Conductor Copper, #8, 40 amps

Sub--Panel Amperage Unable to determine

Sub-Panel Location Shop

Branch Wiring

Wire Material Copper and Multi-strand Aluminum

Wiring Method Non-metallic sheathed cable, Knob and tube

(E-1) Repair: This home still appears to employ some knob and tube wiring. This is an old soldered style of wiring that would not meet today's standards. Some insurance companies will not insure homes with this type of wiring. During testing today I noted several ungrounded outlets as well as a few knob and tube circuits. I recommend consulting with a licensed electrician about ways to improve this system and take pressure off existing knob and tube. Installation of additional circuits and of arc fault protected breakers can help make the system safer and more reliable. Complete removal and replacement of all knob and tube is recommended but considerably more expensive and not always necessary. Many homes of this age in this area still employ at least a few knob and tube circuits. You need to update to a level you feel comfortable with.

(E-2) Repair: Multiple open electrical junction boxes were noted in the crawl space and one in the home above the closet - they need to be covered for improved safety.

(E-3) Repair: The non-metallic sheathed cable is poorly supported and requires staples or hangers for additional support. This type of wiring should be supported every 4 feet and within 2 feet of junction boxes.

(E-4) Repair: The wiring to the water heater is not protected from physical damage and is a potential safety hazard. Have this wiring further evaluated and repaired by a licensed electrician.

Receptacles and Fixtures

Inspection Method Random Testing

Outlets Three wire outlets

(E-5) Repair: The use of GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interruption) protection is inconsistent with modern minimum standards for safety. GFCI protection is recommended for the electrical receptacles in the following locations: all kitchen countertops, bathrooms, exterior, garage, unfinished basement, laundry and all wet and damp locations. GFCI's protect against electrocution by limiting the duration of an electrical shock. These are an important modern safety feature. Hire a licensed electrician to further evaluate and update this home's system for improved safety. I noted missing GFCIs in the kitchen.

(E-6) Repair: The bathroom lighting circuit was noted to be flickering during operation, suggesting that repair could be needed to the wiring to insure safe and reliable performance. Have this further investigated by a licensed electrician.

(E-7) Improve: The cracked electrical cover plate should be replaced - see shop.

Smoke and CO Alarm Systems

Present

Grounding Electrode / Conductor

Could Not Confirm

Fuel Storage and Distribution

Oil Storage

None noted

Propane Storage

Present

Storage Type Above ground tank

Propane Tank Size (2) 120 gal

Propane Tank Location Road side exterior wall

Propane Shutoff Location At tank

(FSD-1) Note: Tanks must be refilled before they run empty, if not they will need to be tested and this is expensive. Each tank showed 80% full.

Gas Meter

None noted

Gas, Propane and Oil Piping

(FSD-2) Repair: The gas piping at the exterior of the building is corroding and appears to have inadequate protection from rust-inhibitive paint. To insure reliable performance, I recommend painting with rust inhibitive paint.

Heating, Cooling and Fireplaces

Heating System

Energy Source Electricity, Propane

Cooling Systems / Heat Pumps

None Noted

Heating / Cooling Distribution Systems

Heat Source in Each Room Present

Distribution Method Baseboard heaters

Additional Heat Sources

None noted

Gas Fireplaces

Present

Fireplace Types Propane wood stove

Plumbing

Water Service Supply

Pipe Material PEX

Well or Public Supply Well

Water Pressure 50 PSI

Pressure Reducing Valve None noted

Main Water Shut-off Location Crawl space

(P-1) Note: Water shut off

Distribution Pipe

Pipe Insulation Non-Standard

Supply Pipe Materials PEX, Galvanized steel, Copper

Functional Flow Average

(P-2) Repair: The supply piping here is a hodge podge of different patches and partial updates using a variety of different supply piping materials. The system was generally functional at the time of inspection but could require repairs at any time. A cohesive supply piping update is recommended for improved reliability. Observations noted during inspection include:

Waste Pipe and Discharge

Discharge Type Septic system

Waste and Vent Pipe Materials ABS plastic

(P-3) Due Diligence: This home's sewage appears to employ an on-site private septic system. Please note that an evaluation of this system is beyond the scope of this inspection. I recommend having this system further evaluated by a septic specialist.

(P-4) Improve: The waste pipe venting system is not correctly terminated above the roof - I noted an air admittance or "cheater" valve installed behind a grille in the laundry room. This could allow sewer gas to enter the home. This is a safety hazard. Repair by correctly running this vent above the roof.

Water Heater

System Type Tank

Manufacturer GE

Water Temperature 123 F

Size 50 gal

Age 11 years

Energy Source Electricity

Temperature Pressure Relief Value Present - Not Tested

(P-5) Repair: Install listed seismic straps to support the water heater in the event of an earthquake - plumber's tape is not considered an adequate support. Two listed seismic straps are recommended one for the top 1/3rd and one for the bottom 1/3rd of the tank.

(P-6) Improve: Testing of the plumbing system today, I noted the water was hot - 123 degrees. This is a scald hazard. To prevent scalding, standards recommend indoor hot water temperatures do not exceed 120 degrees. There is some evidence that hot water temperatures should be greater than 130 degrees to prevent Legionaries' disease from developing in the water heater. If this is a concern, have a tempering valve installed at the hot water tank. Have this further evaluated and repaired by a licensed plumber or simply turn down the temperature as desired to eliminate a scald hazard.

Exterior Hose Bibs

Operating

Additional Sinks

None noted

Sewage Ejector Pumps

None noted

Sump Pumps and Drains

Floor Drain Present (Driveway)

Washer

Tested

Dryer

Tested

Power Source Electric

Duct to Exterior Ducted

(P-7) Repair: The dryer exhaust duct termination at the exterior of the building is covered with a screen. This is a safety hazard that could block lint and cause a fire. The dryer has a baffle making the screen unnecessary.

(P-8) Repair: Foil dryer exhaust duct was noted in use to connect the dryer to the rigid vent. This product is not recommended as it has proven to be unreliable and a potential fire hazard. A corrugated metal flex duct is recommended.

Additional Plumbing

None noted

Bathroom(s)

Sinks and Cabinets

Tested

Toilet

Tested

Bathtub / Shower

Tested

Bathroom Ventilation

Type Bath fan

General Bath Condition

Standard

Kitchen

Sinks and Faucets

Tested

Cabinets and Countertops

Countertop Material Unknown

Cabinet Material Wood laminate

Ventilation Method

Fan ducted to exterior

Appliances

Refrigerator Operating

Dishwasher Operated

Dishwasher Air Gap Present

Disposer None noted

(K-2) Due Diligence: The dishwasher appears to have an air gap installed. Inquire with the seller as to why this was installed inside the cabinet and not accessible? I operated the dishwasher but there is the chance of concealed damage and lack of access in the future to consider.

General Kitchen Condition

Standard

Interior

Floors

Floor Materials Vinyl composite tiles, Wood Laminate

Floor Settlement Moderate

(I-1) Repair: Settlement was noted in the floor frame system during inspection today. This is to be expected in a home with a post and pier foundation and poorly compacted soils.

Walls, Ceilings and Closets

Wall and Ceiling Materials Drywall

(I-2) Major Concern: Rodent feces were noted inside the house today indicating that extensive rodent seal up and clean up work is needed. Hire a rodent control operator to further evaluate and repair.

Stairs and Railings

None

Interior Doors

Hollow Core

Windows

Window Glazing Double pane

Interior Window Frame Vinyl, Wood

Window Styles Sliding

(I-3) Repair: The screens for some of the windows are damaged and require replacement.

(I-4) Repair: The old wood windows in the master bedroom are painted shut and not operational. This is an issue with egress and means of escape and the windows should be made operational.

Mechanical Ventilation

Bath Fan Ducting Ductwork not visible

Kitchen Fan Ducting Ducted to exterior

Roof/Attic

Roof Materials

Method of Roof Inspection Walked on roof

Roof Style Gable

Roof Materials Architectural grade composition shingle

Approximate Age of Roof 3 years

(RA-1) Due Diligence: The roofing material on this building appears to be a recently installed dimensional or architectural grade shingle. These are often rated as 30-year shingles. In practice, as a roof assembly, I find these last closer to 18-22 years depending on the quality of the installation, the steepness of the roof and the amount of exposure. The installation appears neat and professional. Inquire with the seller about any warranty information for this roof. Many professional roofing companies will offer limited workmanship warranties.

Shop Roof

Method of Roof Inspection Viewed at top of ladder

Roof Style Gable

Roof Materials Metal with exposed fasteners

Approximate Age of Roof 20 years

Gutters and Downspouts

Aluminum

(RA-2) Repair: The downspouts to the home are missing splash blocks to help divert water away from the pier system. This is a pest conducive condition and splash blocks should be added to improve drainage.

(RA-3) Repair: The shop gutters are clogged with organic debris and require cleaning, there is also damage to the gutter and fascia on the west side of the building. Clean the gutters and insure they are unobstructed, leak free and properly sloped to drain.

(RA-4) Repair: The disconnected downspout at the south end of the shop requires immediate repair to prevent water damage to the side of the building.

Attic Access

No access. Vaulted ceiling

Roof Framing and Sheathing

Rafters Not visible

Sheathing OSB, Solid wood

Attic Insulation

Insulation Type Fiberglass

Approximate Insulation R-Value on Attic Ceiling Inconsistent

Attic and Roof Cavity Ventilation

Attic Ventilation Method Gable vents, Soffit vents

Exterior/Garage

Siding and Trim

Trim Material Wood

Siding Material Board and batten

(EG-1) Note: Localized rot repairs are needed to the exterior siding. Hire a licensed general contractor to further evaluate and repair all exterior siding and trim as needed. See grading recommendations.

Eaves

Cedar

(EG-2) Repair: Localized wood decay was noted at the rafter tails where they stick out past the roofline. I recommend building metal caps for these to better protect the wood and / or cutting away the rotted wood.

Exterior Doors

Glass panel doors, French doors, Solid core

Exterior Window Frames

Vinyl

Decks and Balconies

Present

Deck Structure Ground contact treated lumber, Non-treated lumber

Deck Ledger Board Not applicable

Guardrail Standard

Decking Material Softwood

(EG-3) Repair: The deck posts appear to be settling in places - see how the deck is not level. During repairs to the decking system have the posts and footings further evaluated and repaired by a licensed contractor.

(EG-4) Repair: The nails used in the joist hangers and attachments for the deck appear to be the wrong type of fastener - these may be wood screws. Teco nails are the proper nails to use for joist hangers and these should be double hot dipped galvanized or better to resist corrosion. I noted some corrosion on some of these screws. Have this further investigated and repaired as recommended by a qualified general contractor to insure reliable fastening of the hangers. The use of fasteners in these connectors is inconsistent with manufacturer specifications for proper installation.

(EG-5) Repair: The decking on this deck has been painted and is very exposed to the weather. This will allow water to penetrate the wood and can hasten the deterioration process. Localized soft spots were found, but there appears to be some useful remaining service life. I recommend replacing this decking in the near term for safety and reliability. Please note that some of the structure of the deck is treated lumber and should be re-usable.

Chimneys

Present

Chimney Material Metal

Chimney Flue Liners Present

Garage

Detached

Automatic Garage Opener Present

Garage Door Type Metal

(EG-6) Improve: The automatic garage door opener on the right side in the shop is an older model that is not equipped with laser eyes for use as a safety feature. These are less safe than modern openers which will reverse when the laser beam is broken. Updating this opener is recommended for improved safety.

Grounds

Drainage and Lot Location

Clearance to Grade Non-standard

Downspout Discharge Above grade

Lot Description Steep slope

(G-1) Repair: Eliminate siding /soil contact to reduce the chances for rot and pest damage and repair any hidden rot as needed. Generally, a 6 inch clearance between soils and wood is recommended. This is often not realistic on older buildings, but repairs should be made to get as much clearance as is possible and all contact must be eliminated. One trick where clearances are close is to remove soils and back-fill with gravel - the gravel will not hold water and will help keep the base of the siding dry. Still try and keep gravel below the level of the siding.

Driveways/Walkways/Flatwork

Driveway Gravel

Walkways Concrete

(G-2) Due Diligence: The poured concrete bulkhead has cracked and settled. This requires repair for a proper function and is outside the scope of a home inspection. I recommend contacting a professional engineer for further evaluation.

(G-3) Repair: Typical cracks were noted in the concrete walkway along the steps. No immediate repair appears necessary, though water will continue to deteriorate the surface until the crack is repaired or replaced.

Grounds, Trees and Vegetation

Trees/Vegetation too near building Yes

Retaining Walls

Present

Retaining Wall Material Block

Exterior Stairs

Non-standard

(G-4) Repair: A guardrail is needed for the exterior stairs. All stairs greater than three steps should have a guardrail with openings no larger than 4 inches. Hire a licensed general contractor to further evaluate and repair. The stairs also show signs of moderate settlement.

(G-5) Repair: Localized rot was noted in the stairs handrail for the front stairs.

Fences

None noted

Carport, Outbuildings and Other

Detached Garage

Receipt -- Single Family Inspection

Report #:
180323B
Inspection Date:
2018-03-23

Property Inspected For
Mr and Mrs Client
Washington Blvd NE Kingston, WA 98346

Residential Home and Structural Pest Inspection$475.00
$475.00


Rainshadow Home Inspection
C/O James Lagergren
237 Taylor St 2nd Floor
Port Townsend, WA 98368
(360) 301-2035