Company Information

Campion Home Inspection

Phone: (360) 928-5006
dustincampion@yahoo.com
http://www.campionhomeinspection.com

Inspected by: Dustin
WA State Pest License #: 97189
WA State Home Inspector #: 2277

(This is a Sample Report. Not all houses are the same and not all reports are the same. A couple examples being that a complete WDO inspection comes with a diagram which this house didn't require. Or if this place had a furnace and duct system instead of a gas fireplace)

The house was occupied during the inspection which does limit the inspection in many ways (example: rugs hiding stains, paintings hiding holes in the wall, etc.) and may lead to things being called out that won't be any issue once the occupants move (example: stored items in a crawlspace or attic that are taken with the currant occupant when they move out).

The Master bedroom and bath are excluded per client request.

The Scope and Purpose of a Home Inspection

Purchasing property involves risk

The purpose of a home inspection is to help reduce the risk associated with the purchase of a structure by providing a professional opinion about the overall condition of the structure. A home inspection is a limited visual inspection and it cannot eliminate this risk. Some homes present more risks than others. We cannot control this, but we try to help educate you about what we don’t know during the inspection process. This is more difficult to convey in a report and one of many reasons why we recommend that you attend the inspection.

A home inspection is not an insurance policy

This report does not substitute for or serve as a warranty or guarantee of any kind. Home warranties can be purchased separately from insuring firms that provide this service.

A home inspection is visual and not destructive

The descriptions and observations in this report are based on a visual inspection of the structure. We inspect the aspects of the structure that can be viewed without dismantling, damaging or disfiguring the structure and without moving furniture and interior furnishings. Areas that are concealed, hidden or inaccessible to view are not covered by this inspection. Some systems cannot be tested during this inspection as testing risks damaging the building. For example, overflow drains on bathtubs are generally not tested because if they were found to be leaking they could damage the finishes below. Our procedures involve non-invasive investigation and non-destructive testing which will limit the scope of the inspection.

This is not an inspection for code compliance

This inspection and report are not intended for city / local code compliance. During the construction process structures are inspected for code compliance by municipal inspectors. Framing is open at this time and conditions can be fully viewed. Framing is not open during inspections of finished homes, and this limits the inspection. All houses fall out of code compliance shortly after they are built, as the codes continually change. National codes are augmented at least every three years for all of the varying disciplines. Municipalities can choose to adopt and phase in sections of the codes on their own timetables. There are generally no requirements to bring older homes into compliance unless substantial renovation is being done.

This is just our opinion

Construction techniques and standards vary. There is no one way to build a house or install a system in a house. The observations in this report are the opinions of the home inspector. Other inspectors and contractors are likely to have some differing opinions. You are welcome to seek opinions from other professionals.

The scope of this inspection

This inspection will include the following systems: exterior, roof, structure, drainage, foundation, attic, interior, plumbing, electrical and heating. The evaluation will be based on limited observations that are primarily visual and non-invasive. This inspection and report are not intended to be technically exhaustive.For more about the scope of a home inspection see: ASHI National Standards at http://www.homeinspector.org/Standards-of-Practice or Washington State Home Inspection Standards at http://app.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=18.280.030

Your expectations

The overall goal of a home inspection is to help ensure that your expectations are appropriate with the house you are proposing to buy. To this end we assist with discovery by showing and documenting observations during the home inspection. This should not be mistaken for a technically exhaustive inspection designed to uncover every defect with a building. Such inspections are available but they are generally cost-prohibitive to most homebuyers.

Your participation is requested

Your presence is requested during this inspection. A written report will not substitute for all the possible information that can be conveyed verbally by a shared visual observation of the conditions of the property.

How to Read This Report

Getting the Information to You

This report is designed to deliver important and technical information in a way that is easy for anyone to access and understand. If you are in a hurry, you can take a quick look at our "Summary Page” and quickly get critical information for important decision making. However, we strongly recommend that you take the time to read the full Report, which includes digital photographs, captions, diagrams, videos and hot links to additional information.

The best way to get the layers of information that are presented in this report is to read your report online. This will allow all you to expand your learning about your house. You will notice some words or series of words highlighted in blue and underlined – clicking on these will provide you with a link to additional information.

This report can also be printed on paper or to a PDF document.

Chapters and Sections

This report is divided into chapters that parcel the home into logical inspection components. Each chapter is broken into sections that relate to a specific system or component of the home. You can navigate between chapters with the click of a button on the left side margin.

Most sections will contain some descriptive information done in black font. Observation narrative, done in colored boxes, will be included if a system or component is found to be significantly deficient in some way or if we wish to provide helpful additional information about the system or the scope of our inspection. If a system or component of the home was deemed to be in satisfactory or serviceable condition, there may be no narrative observation comments in that section.

Observation Labels

All narrative observations are colored, numbered and labeled to help you find, refer to, and understand the severity of the observation. Observation colors and labels used in this report are:

  • Major Concern:
    Repair items that may cost significant money to correct now or in the near future, or items that require immediate attention to prevent additional damage or eliminate safety hazards.
  • Repair:
    Repair and maintenance items noted during inspection. Please note that some repair items can be expensive to correct such as re-finishing hardwood floors, but are considered simply repair items due to their cosmetic nature.
  • Improve:
    Observations that are not necessarily defects, but which could be improved for safety, efficiency, or reliability reasons.
  • Monitor:
    Items that should be watched to see if correction may be needed in the future.
  • Due Diligence:
    Observation such as a buried oil tank that may require further investigation to determine the severity and / or urgency of repair.
  • Future Project:
    A repair that may be deferred for some time but should be on the radar for repair or replacement in the near future.
  • Efficiency:
    Denotes observations that are needed to make the home more energy efficient as well as to bring the home up to modern insulation standards. This category typically includes windows and insulation. Other items, such as lighting and appliances, are not inspected for their energy status.
  • Completed:
    Items that were initially an issue but have since been completed.
  • Note:
    Refers to aside information and /or any comments elaborating on descriptions of systems in the home or limitations to the home inspection.

Summary Page

The Summary Page is designed as a bulleted overview of all the observations noted during inspection. This helpful overview is not a substitution for reading the entire inspection report. The entire report must be read to get a complete understanding of this inspection report as the Summary Page does not include photographs or photo captions.

Summary

Major Concerns

  • (E-1) Electrical:

    Smoke alarms were present but not tested. Carbon monoxide alarms were missing on both floors. This is a life safety hazard. By law, at the time of any real estate sale, CO alarms must be installed in close proximity to all sleeping areas, on every floor level and in accordance with manufacturer's recommendations. I recommend installing approved CO alarms in the required locations. All work to be completed by a qualified person. (This is a Major Safety Concern but an easy and fairly inexpensive fix.)

Repairs

  • (CS-1) Crawl Space:

    The crawl space was filled with stored items and construction material. (Most if not all of this will leave with the current tenants) This is a conducive condition to pest infestations and it is highly recommended to have all of the items and materials be removed as soon as possible and reinspected after.

  • (FSD-1) Fuel Storage and Distribution:

    The gas meter is heavily obstructed. This is a safety concern. Recommend general contractor to evaluate and rebuild front deck in such a manner as to allow unobstructed access to the gas meter and shut off valve.

  • (B-2) Bathroom(s):

    Caulking is needed between the upstairs shower and the floor in the bathroom as well as around the sink in the downstairs bathroom to prevent water from damaging the floor.

  • (K-1) Kitchen:

    The kitchen downdraft fan is inoperative and requires repair or replacement. Recommend repairs to be done by electrical contractor.

  • (I-1) Interior:

    The interior stairs are missing a graspable handrail for safety. This should be a round railing 1 and 1/4 inches - 2 inches in diameter. If the railing is not round it must have a finger groove that is 3/4 of an inch down from the tallest point of the rail. The graspable handrail should also be 1.5 inches from the wall and have returns into the wall. Recommend to have a qualified contractor build suitable railings to reduce the potential for falls.

  • (RA-5) Roof/Attic:

    The cardboard baffles in the attic are designed to keep insulation away from soffit vents to insure these vents communicate. These are falling down in places. This could block proper air flow. Secure loose baffles to insure they perform as intended. Recommend insulation contractor to evaluation replace baffles as needed.

  • (EG-1) Exterior/Garage:

    The concrete foot pad off the stairs to the back deck slopes towards the house. This will lead to excess moisture draining toward the house and is conducive to moisture damage to the foundation. Recommend evaluation and repair by qualified contractor.

  • (G-1) Grounds:

    All trees, branches and vegetation should be pruned at least six feet away (11 inches recommended for flower beds) from the building to eliminate a condition conducive to wood destroying organisms and a path for rodent entry.

  • (G-2) Grounds:

    Eliminate wood to soil contact at the fencing to eliminate a condition conducive to wood destroying organisms as well as detaching it from the house (at least an inch is recommended). Often, gravel is used as back fill against a fence. This acts as a capillary break and helps keep the base of the wood dry. Recommend work to be done by qualified person.

Improves

  • (P-2) Plumbing:

    Water heater pan required: Where water heaters or hot water storage tanks are installed above the ground floor space, in attics or ceiling areas, or within the habitable space, the tank or water heater shall be installed in a galvanized steel or other metal pan of equal corrosion resistance having a minimum thickness of 24 gauge, 0.0276 inch (0.70 mm). Electric water heaters shall be installed in a metal pan as herein required or in a high-impact plastic pan of at least 0.0625 inch (1.59 mm) thickness. Pan size and drain. The pan shall be not less than 1.5 inches (38 mm) deep and shall be of sufficient size and shape to receive all dripping or condensate from the tank or water heater. The pan shall be drained by an indirect waste pipe having a minimum diameter of 0.75 inch (19 mm). Pan drain termination. The pan drain shall extend full-size and terminate over a suitably located indirect waste receptor or floor drain or extend to the exterior of the building and terminate not less than 6 inches (152 mm) and not more than 24 inches (610 mm) above the adjacent ground surface. There should also be listed seismic straps installed to support the water heater in the event of an earthquake; none were noted during inspection. Two straps should be located on each water heater: one on upper 1/3rd of tank and one at the lower 1/3rd. Recommend licensed plumber to evaluate and repair as necessary.

  • (RA-3) Roof/Attic:

    The attic access hatch requires insulation and weather stripping to prevent heat loss and heat migration into the attic.

Monitors

  • (B-1) Bathroom(s):

    Skylight in the upstairs bathroom showed signs of previous moisture damage. It was dry at time of inspection. Recommend to monitor the possible leak and to have evaluation of the skylight and repairs be done by qualified general contractor in the near future if required.

  • (RA-4) Roof/Attic:

    Minor stains were noted on the roof decking material when viewed from the attic. This indicates the attic has experienced prior condensation problems during the cold weather months. Generally, the way to prevent seasonal condensation in an attic involves a 4-pronged approach:

    1. Air seal the ceiling as is feasible to slow air migration from the interior into the attic.

    2. Be sure all bath and kitchen fans in the attic are well-sealed and venting to the exterior.

    3. Keep indoor relative humidity below 55% during cold-weather months

    4. Make sure the roof cavity / attic spaces are correctly ventilated.

    This condition was mild at the time of inspection and did not warrant repairs at this time in my opinion. Attic condensation is a seasonal issue and it can be difficult to predict during a home inspection of there could be on-going problems. Monitor during cold weather to determine of additional repairs are needed.

Due Diligences

  • (HCF-2) Heating, Cooling and Fireplaces:

    The gas fireplace and wall mounted electrical heaters had all identification tags removed. This limits the inspection greatly (without make and model I cannot identify the fireplace). There did not seem to be any leaks, the glass was clean and the pilot light was on. Recommend checking with the seller for more information and/or further evaluation by licensed HVAC technician.

  • (P-1) Plumbing:

    The water heater is covered by a an insulation jacket. I was unable to determine the size or age of the water heater as this obstructed the listing plate. Inquire with the seller regarding the age of the water heater.

  • (RA-1) Roof/Attic:

    Some moss was noted during inspection. Recommend having the roof professionally cleaned in a non-destructive way (I never recommend power washing a roof).

Notes

  • (HCF-1) Heating, Cooling and Fireplaces:

    Distribution is not applicable, individual dedicated heat sources were present in interior rooms. However the upstairs "livable" rooms were lacking apparent sources of heat. (plug-in space heaters don't count) Examples of livable rooms include bedrooms, kitchens and living/dining rooms, NOT hallways, closets or bathrooms. These rooms were still under ongoing construction and should be reinspected after completion to confirm the problem is fixed.

  • (K-2) Kitchen:

    Stored items and appliances outside the scope of the inspection greatly limit the inspection.

  • (RA-2) Roof/Attic:

    Half of the attic was inaccessible due to obstruction.

  • (G-3) Grounds:

    Helpful Home Maintenance Check List for a Healthier Home

    The following is a general maintenance guide for homeowners, some tips may not be relevant to your home. Recommend a common sense approach to this list and overall home maintenance.

    Monthly:


    1. Vacuum and clean all return air ducts/grills.
    2. Purge garbage disposal by first filling kitchen sink with clean water, then turn on food disposer until water is drained through.
    3. Change/clean air conditioning return filters monthly. This will help keep your air cleaner and system running more efficiently. Clogged air filters will make your system operate longer than required, thereby increasing your monthly bills.
    4. Wash refrigerator/freezer interior walls and door liner with solution of 1-quart warm water: 2 tablespoons of baking soda and wipe dry.
    5. Clean dishwasher filter (if provided), usually at lower spray arm, and wipe door gasket clean with a damp cloth.
    6. Inspect lighting fixtures and replace blown light bulbs.
    7. Clean clothes drier lint traps and or ducts to reduce fire risk.
    8. Clean toaster oven crumb tray.

    Quarterly:

    1.Inspect exterior doors to ensure they are weather tight. Adjust or replace weather stripping as needed.
    2. Service doors (incl. garage doors) and drawers, clean and lubricate latches, hinges and guides.
    3. Inspect and repair exterior caulking around windows, doors, and siding.
    4. Replace/clean central heating system (furnace) filters.
    5. Re-tighten knobs on kitchen cabinets, don't overtighten.

    Semi-Annually:

    1. Have heating and air-conditioning systems inspected and serviced by licensed contractor.
    2. Inspect and test smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors and replace back up batteries.
    3. Check (GFCI) ground fault interrupted circuits.
    4. Inspect and maintain proper drainage around home. Clean gutters and down-pipes and ensure water is flowing away from your home.
    5. Inspect home for rodent droppings or other pests. Have home treated as needed.
    6. Test sump pump for reliable operation, especially before any rainy season.
    7. Wash fan housing and metal filter connected to range hood exhaust fans. These can be safely washed by placing them inside the dishwasher.
    8. Vacuum coils behind refrigerator/freezer to remove dust; this will improve efficiency of unit.
    9. Tap off a bucket of water from the hot water heater until it runs clean.

    Annually:

    1. Inspect and repair settling cracks (if necessary).
    2. Inspect and lubricate garage door tracks.
    3. Inspect exterior paint for cracking and wear. Repaint or seal as needed.
    4. Drain and refill water heater.
    5. Trip main breaker on electric panel.
    6. Inspect all electric cords and replace if necessary.
    7. Inspect attic for water damage, birds, and rodents.
    8. Inspect basement for moisture/mold and wood rot.
    9. Inspect attic for signs of roof leaks or water damage, bird nests, rodent or squirrel nests, and clean if necessary.
    10. Change water filters and have water softeners serviced.
    11. Inspect roof flashings, chimney caps, shingles(for mold and damage) and caulking for possible damage.
    12. Pressure wash deck, walkways and driveway.
    13. Reseal wood decks with preservative and inspect and secure nails that may be protruding out. Nails have a tendency to pop out after very cold weather conditions.
    14. Clean or replace oil filter(oil fired burner only).
    15. Inspect outside electrical service feeder for exposed bare wires and tree interference.
    16. Inspect basement/crawl space area for signs of termites and/or other wood-boring insects.
    17. Use hose to wash off dirt from coil and fan in heat pump/condenser locate outside of house.
    18. Inspect all hoses(and replace if necessary) connected to laundry washer unit.
    19. Clean and seal ceramic tile grout lines in bathrooms/toilets/kitchen.
    20. Check caulking at tub and shower, and replace if necessary.
    21. Wash and blow clean bathroom exhaust fan grill and fan blades.
    22. Wash windows(exterior and interior), screens, seals and ledges. Repair if necessary.
    23. Clean and lubricate sliding glass door tracks and window tracks.
    24. Check stucco joints around doors and windows.
    25. Inspect the dishwasher's motor spin seal, and replace if necessary.
    26. Inspect laundry washer, water fill hoses for cracks, blisters, corroded fittings and leaks.
    27. Place beeswax or paraffin on built-in kitchen cabinets that have wooden guides.
    28. Inspect for creosote deposits in the fireplace flue liner, these are black or brown residue of combustion that collects on the inner surfaces. If the buildup is more than 1/8 inch, remove it.
    29. Vacuum around the gas hot water heater (especially near furnace) to remove dirt and grime.

    Tips for clogged drains:

    Keeping the Drains Clear:
    1. By pouring a pot of hot water down the drain once a week will melt away any fat or grease that may have built up in the drain line or P-trap.
    2. If you have a clogged drain, just pour a 1/2 cup of baking soda and 1/2 cup of white vinegar down the drain. Cover the drain and let the mixture sit for a few minutes, then pour a pot of hot water down the drain. This will break down fats and keep the drains smelling fresh.
    3. Every six months, keep your drains clean by using a copper sulfide or sodium hydroxide-based drain cleaner, or other recommended drain cleaner available from your local store.

    Other safety tips:

    Ensure that you know where the following items are located:
    1. Emergency contact telephone numbers.
    2. Fire extinguishers and water hose pipes.
    3. Heating gas/fuel main shutoff valve.
    4. Main electrical disconnect circuit breaker (breaker box/service panel).
    5. Main drain line clean out.
    6. Main water shut off valve.
    7. All window and door exits.

    In addition to the above, carry out the following monthly safety checks:
    Some of these items may have already be included in the home maintenance list, but these monthly safety checks are advisable for safety reasons:
    1. Test ground fault circuit interrupter receptacles(GFCI's).
    2. Test smoke and carbon monoxide alarms and replace batteries if necessary.
    3. Inspect and lubricate (if necessary) all emergency exits, including windows and doors.
    4. Inspection of heating unit and water heater for visual integrity.

    Estimated life spans of most Home appliance:

    1.Dishwasher water valves: 3-7 years
    2.Range and oven: 18-20 years
    3.Garbage disposal: 10 years
    4.Microwave: 10 years
    5.Refrigerator: 18-20 years
    6.Laundry washer: 14 years
    7.Laundry drier: 14 years
    8.Refrigerator/Freezer: 18-20 years
    9.Central air conditioner system: 15 years
    10.Window mounted air conditioning system: 8 years
    11.Bathtub/Sink: 50 years
    12.Garage door opener: 10 years
    13.Laundry water fill hoses: 3-5 years
    14.Trash compactor: 10 years

General Comments

Building Characteristics / Conditions

Style of Home Custom Build

Type of Building Single Family

Approximate Square Footage 1,929

Approximate Year of Original Construction 2009

Attending the Inspection Vacant (inspector only)

Occupancy The home was occupied Occupied- occupants in the process of moving

Weather during the inspection Cloudy

Approximate temperature during the inspection Below 65[F]

Ground/Soil surface conditions Damp

House (the front door) faces North

Structure and Basement

Foundation

Evidence of Seismic Protection Present

Building Configuration Crawl space

Foundation Description Poured concrete

Floor, Wall and Ceiling Framing

Wall Framing Not visible

Wall Insulation Not visible

Wall Sheathing Not visible

Floor Framing Trusses, Partly visible

Sub-Floor Material Not visible

Ceiling Framing Not visible

Crawl Space

Crawl Space Access

Method of Inspection Crawled, but visibility was limited by stored items

(CS-1) Repair:

The crawl space was filled with stored items and construction material. (Most if not all of this will leave with the current tenants) This is a conducive condition to pest infestations and it is highly recommended to have all of the items and materials be removed as soon as possible and reinspected after.

Vapor Barrier

Vapor Barrier Material Plastic

Crawl Space Ventilation

Ventilation Method Exterior wall vents

Posts and Footings

Standard

Insulation

Insulation Type Fiberglass

Approximate R-Value R-19

Electrical

Service Equipment

Volts 120/240

Service Drop Underground

Service Entrance (SE) conductor Size Aluminum, 4/0, 200 amps

Electric Service Amperage 200 amps

Main Electric Panel Location Utility room

Branch Wiring

Wire Material Copper

Wiring Method Non-metallic sheathed cable

Receptacles and Fixtures

Inspection Method Random Testing

Outlets Three wire outlets

Smoke and CO Alarm Systems

Present

(E-1) Major Concern:

Smoke alarms were present but not tested. Carbon monoxide alarms were missing on both floors. This is a life safety hazard. By law, at the time of any real estate sale, CO alarms must be installed in close proximity to all sleeping areas, on every floor level and in accordance with manufacturer's recommendations. I recommend installing approved CO alarms in the required locations. All work to be completed by a qualified person. (This is a Major Safety Concern but an easy and fairly inexpensive fix.)

Grounding Electrode / Conductor

Present

Fuel Storage and Distribution

Oil Storage

None noted

Propane Storage

None noted

Gas Meter

Present

Gas Shutoff Location Front of house

Gas Pipe Materials Steel and flex pipe

(FSD-1) Repair:

The gas meter is heavily obstructed. This is a safety concern. Recommend general contractor to evaluate and rebuild front deck in such a manner as to allow unobstructed access to the gas meter and shut off valve.

(FSD-2) Note:

Here is a link to Puget Sound Energy's Installation Requirements for Gas Meter Set Assemblies: https://getscribeware.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/PSE-Gas-Meter-Clearances.pdf

Heating, Cooling and Fireplaces

Heating System

Energy Source Natural gas, Electricity

Heating Method Gas fireplace/insert, Electric unitary heaters

Manufacturer Unknown

Age Unknown

Last Service Record None

Cooling Systems / Heat Pumps

None Noted

Heating / Cooling Distribution Systems

Heat Source in Each Room Incomplete

(HCF-1) Note:

Distribution is not applicable, individual dedicated heat sources were present in interior rooms. However the upstairs "livable" rooms were lacking apparent sources of heat. (plug-in space heaters don't count) Examples of livable rooms include bedrooms, kitchens and living/dining rooms, NOT hallways, closets or bathrooms. These rooms were still under ongoing construction and should be reinspected after completion to confirm the problem is fixed.

Additional Heat Sources

None noted

Gas Fireplaces

Present

Fireplace Types Sealed gas log fireplace

(HCF-2) Due Diligence:

The gas fireplace and wall mounted electrical heaters had all identification tags removed. This limits the inspection greatly (without make and model I cannot identify the fireplace). There did not seem to be any leaks, the glass was clean and the pilot light was on. Recommend checking with the seller for more information and/or further evaluation by licensed HVAC technician.

Solid Fuel Fireplaces

None noted

Plumbing

Water Service Supply

Pipe Material Copper

Well or Public Supply Public

Water Pressure 40, PSI

Pressure Reducing Valve None noted

Main Water Shut-off Location Next to water heater just below the water heater shut off.

Distribution Pipe

Pipe Insulation Present

Supply Pipe Materials Copper

Functional Flow Average

Waste Pipe and Discharge

Discharge Type Public sewer

Waste and Vent Pipe Materials ABS plastic

Water Heater

System Type Tank

Manufacturer Unknown

Water Temperature 118 F

Size Unknown

Age Unknown

Energy Source Electricity

Temperature Pressure Relief Value Present - Not Tested

(P-1) Due Diligence:

The water heater is covered by a an insulation jacket. I was unable to determine the size or age of the water heater as this obstructed the listing plate. Inquire with the seller regarding the age of the water heater.

(P-2) Improve:

Water heater pan required: Where water heaters or hot water storage tanks are installed above the ground floor space, in attics or ceiling areas, or within the habitable space, the tank or water heater shall be installed in a galvanized steel or other metal pan of equal corrosion resistance having a minimum thickness of 24 gauge, 0.0276 inch (0.70 mm). Electric water heaters shall be installed in a metal pan as herein required or in a high-impact plastic pan of at least 0.0625 inch (1.59 mm) thickness. Pan size and drain. The pan shall be not less than 1.5 inches (38 mm) deep and shall be of sufficient size and shape to receive all dripping or condensate from the tank or water heater. The pan shall be drained by an indirect waste pipe having a minimum diameter of 0.75 inch (19 mm). Pan drain termination. The pan drain shall extend full-size and terminate over a suitably located indirect waste receptor or floor drain or extend to the exterior of the building and terminate not less than 6 inches (152 mm) and not more than 24 inches (610 mm) above the adjacent ground surface. There should also be listed seismic straps installed to support the water heater in the event of an earthquake; none were noted during inspection. Two straps should be located on each water heater: one on upper 1/3rd of tank and one at the lower 1/3rd. Recommend licensed plumber to evaluate and repair as necessary.

Exterior Hose Bibs

Operating

Additional Sinks

Tested

Sewage Ejector Pumps

None noted

Washer

Not tested, clothes in washer

Dryer

Not tested

Power Source Electric

Duct to Exterior Ducted

Additional Plumbing

None noted

Bathroom(s)

Sinks and Cabinets

Tested

Toilet

Tested

Bathtub / Shower

Tested

Bathroom Ventilation

Type Operable window, Bath fan

General Bath Condition

Standard

(B-1) Monitor:

Skylight in the upstairs bathroom showed signs of previous moisture damage. It was dry at time of inspection. Recommend to monitor the possible leak and to have evaluation of the skylight and repairs be done by qualified general contractor in the near future if required.

Kitchen

Sinks and Faucets

Tested

Cabinets and Countertops

Countertop Material Granite

Cabinet Material Wood

Ventilation Method

Fan ducted to exterior

(K-1) Repair:

The kitchen downdraft fan is inoperative and requires repair or replacement. Recommend repairs to be done by electrical contractor.

Appliances

Refrigerator Operating

Dishwasher Operated

Dishwasher Air Gap Present

Range/ Oven /Cook-tops Electric

Disposer Not operated

General Kitchen Condition

Standard

Interior

Floors

Floor Materials Carpet, Wood Laminate, Vinyl composite tiles

Floor Settlement None noted

Walls, Ceilings and Closets

Wall and Ceiling Materials Drywall, Decorative Copper Overlay, Wood

Stairs and Railings

Non-standard

(I-1) Repair:

The interior stairs are missing a graspable handrail for safety. This should be a round railing 1 and 1/4 inches - 2 inches in diameter. If the railing is not round it must have a finger groove that is 3/4 of an inch down from the tallest point of the rail. The graspable handrail should also be 1.5 inches from the wall and have returns into the wall. Recommend to have a qualified contractor build suitable railings to reduce the potential for falls.

Interior Doors

Solid and Hollow Core

Windows

Window Glazing Double pane

Interior Window Frame Wood

Window Styles Casement, Single hung

Mechanical Ventilation

Bath Fan Ducting Ducted to exterior

Kitchen Fan Ducting Ducted to exterior

Roof/Attic

Roof Materials

Method of Roof Inspection Viewed with binoculars

Roof Style Gable

Roof Materials Three-tab composition shingle

Approximate Age of Roof 9 years

Skylights

Insulated curb style

Gutters and Downspouts

Aluminum

Attic Access

Crawled partial

(RA-3) Improve:

The attic access hatch requires insulation and weather stripping to prevent heat loss and heat migration into the attic.

Roof Framing and Sheathing

Rafters 2x6

Sheathing OSB

(RA-4) Monitor:

Minor stains were noted on the roof decking material when viewed from the attic. This indicates the attic has experienced prior condensation problems during the cold weather months. Generally, the way to prevent seasonal condensation in an attic involves a 4-pronged approach:

1. Air seal the ceiling as is feasible to slow air migration from the interior into the attic.

2. Be sure all bath and kitchen fans in the attic are well-sealed and venting to the exterior.

3. Keep indoor relative humidity below 55% during cold-weather months

4. Make sure the roof cavity / attic spaces are correctly ventilated.

This condition was mild at the time of inspection and did not warrant repairs at this time in my opinion. Attic condensation is a seasonal issue and it can be difficult to predict during a home inspection of there could be on-going problems. Monitor during cold weather to determine of additional repairs are needed.

Attic Insulation

Insulation Type Cellulose, Fiberglass

Approximate Insulation R-Value on Attic Floor 38

Approximate Insulation R-Value on Attic Walls 19

Attic and Roof Cavity Ventilation

Attic Ventilation Method Soffit vents, Ridge vents

(RA-5) Repair:

The cardboard baffles in the attic are designed to keep insulation away from soffit vents to insure these vents communicate. These are falling down in places. This could block proper air flow. Secure loose baffles to insure they perform as intended. Recommend insulation contractor to evaluation replace baffles as needed.

Exterior/Garage

Siding and Trim

Trim Material Wood

Siding Material Hardboard

Eaves

Open rafters

Exterior Doors

French doors, Glass panel doors

Exterior Window Frames

Vinyl

Decks and Balconies

Present

Deck Structure Appearance grade treated lumber

Deck Ledger Board Standard

Guardrail Standard

Decking Material Plastic/synthetic material, wood

(EG-1) Repair:

The concrete foot pad off the stairs to the back deck slopes towards the house. This will lead to excess moisture draining toward the house and is conducive to moisture damage to the foundation. Recommend evaluation and repair by qualified contractor.

Chimneys

Present

Chimney Material Metal

Chimney Flue Liners Not visible

Garage

None noted

Grounds

Drainage and Lot Location

Clearance to Grade Standard

Downspout Discharge Below grade

Lot Description Moderate slope

Driveways/Walkways/Flatwork

Driveway Gravel

Walkways Gravel

Grounds, Trees and Vegetation

Trees/Vegetation too near building Yes

(G-1) Repair:

All trees, branches and vegetation should be pruned at least six feet away (11 inches recommended for flower beds) from the building to eliminate a condition conducive to wood destroying organisms and a path for rodent entry.

Retaining Walls

Present

Retaining Wall Material Brick

Exterior Stairs

None noted

Fences

Present

(G-2) Repair:

Eliminate wood to soil contact at the fencing to eliminate a condition conducive to wood destroying organisms as well as detaching it from the house (at least an inch is recommended). Often, gravel is used as back fill against a fence. This acts as a capillary break and helps keep the base of the wood dry. Recommend work to be done by qualified person.

Yearly Maintenance

(G-3) Note:

Helpful Home Maintenance Check List for a Healthier Home

The following is a general maintenance guide for homeowners, some tips may not be relevant to your home. Recommend a common sense approach to this list and overall home maintenance.

Monthly:


1. Vacuum and clean all return air ducts/grills.
2. Purge garbage disposal by first filling kitchen sink with clean water, then turn on food disposer until water is drained through.
3. Change/clean air conditioning return filters monthly. This will help keep your air cleaner and system running more efficiently. Clogged air filters will make your system operate longer than required, thereby increasing your monthly bills.
4. Wash refrigerator/freezer interior walls and door liner with solution of 1-quart warm water: 2 tablespoons of baking soda and wipe dry.
5. Clean dishwasher filter (if provided), usually at lower spray arm, and wipe door gasket clean with a damp cloth.
6. Inspect lighting fixtures and replace blown light bulbs.
7. Clean clothes drier lint traps and or ducts to reduce fire risk.
8. Clean toaster oven crumb tray.

Quarterly:

1.Inspect exterior doors to ensure they are weather tight. Adjust or replace weather stripping as needed.
2. Service doors (incl. garage doors) and drawers, clean and lubricate latches, hinges and guides.
3. Inspect and repair exterior caulking around windows, doors, and siding.
4. Replace/clean central heating system (furnace) filters.
5. Re-tighten knobs on kitchen cabinets, don't overtighten.

Semi-Annually:

1. Have heating and air-conditioning systems inspected and serviced by licensed contractor.
2. Inspect and test smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors and replace back up batteries.
3. Check (GFCI) ground fault interrupted circuits.
4. Inspect and maintain proper drainage around home. Clean gutters and down-pipes and ensure water is flowing away from your home.
5. Inspect home for rodent droppings or other pests. Have home treated as needed.
6. Test sump pump for reliable operation, especially before any rainy season.
7. Wash fan housing and metal filter connected to range hood exhaust fans. These can be safely washed by placing them inside the dishwasher.
8. Vacuum coils behind refrigerator/freezer to remove dust; this will improve efficiency of unit.
9. Tap off a bucket of water from the hot water heater until it runs clean.

Annually:

1. Inspect and repair settling cracks (if necessary).
2. Inspect and lubricate garage door tracks.
3. Inspect exterior paint for cracking and wear. Repaint or seal as needed.
4. Drain and refill water heater.
5. Trip main breaker on electric panel.
6. Inspect all electric cords and replace if necessary.
7. Inspect attic for water damage, birds, and rodents.
8. Inspect basement for moisture/mold and wood rot.
9. Inspect attic for signs of roof leaks or water damage, bird nests, rodent or squirrel nests, and clean if necessary.
10. Change water filters and have water softeners serviced.
11. Inspect roof flashings, chimney caps, shingles(for mold and damage) and caulking for possible damage.
12. Pressure wash deck, walkways and driveway.
13. Reseal wood decks with preservative and inspect and secure nails that may be protruding out. Nails have a tendency to pop out after very cold weather conditions.
14. Clean or replace oil filter(oil fired burner only).
15. Inspect outside electrical service feeder for exposed bare wires and tree interference.
16. Inspect basement/crawl space area for signs of termites and/or other wood-boring insects.
17. Use hose to wash off dirt from coil and fan in heat pump/condenser locate outside of house.
18. Inspect all hoses(and replace if necessary) connected to laundry washer unit.
19. Clean and seal ceramic tile grout lines in bathrooms/toilets/kitchen.
20. Check caulking at tub and shower, and replace if necessary.
21. Wash and blow clean bathroom exhaust fan grill and fan blades.
22. Wash windows(exterior and interior), screens, seals and ledges. Repair if necessary.
23. Clean and lubricate sliding glass door tracks and window tracks.
24. Check stucco joints around doors and windows.
25. Inspect the dishwasher's motor spin seal, and replace if necessary.
26. Inspect laundry washer, water fill hoses for cracks, blisters, corroded fittings and leaks.
27. Place beeswax or paraffin on built-in kitchen cabinets that have wooden guides.
28. Inspect for creosote deposits in the fireplace flue liner, these are black or brown residue of combustion that collects on the inner surfaces. If the buildup is more than 1/8 inch, remove it.
29. Vacuum around the gas hot water heater (especially near furnace) to remove dirt and grime.

Tips for clogged drains:

Keeping the Drains Clear:
1. By pouring a pot of hot water down the drain once a week will melt away any fat or grease that may have built up in the drain line or P-trap.
2. If you have a clogged drain, just pour a 1/2 cup of baking soda and 1/2 cup of white vinegar down the drain. Cover the drain and let the mixture sit for a few minutes, then pour a pot of hot water down the drain. This will break down fats and keep the drains smelling fresh.
3. Every six months, keep your drains clean by using a copper sulfide or sodium hydroxide-based drain cleaner, or other recommended drain cleaner available from your local store.

Other safety tips:

Ensure that you know where the following items are located:
1. Emergency contact telephone numbers.
2. Fire extinguishers and water hose pipes.
3. Heating gas/fuel main shutoff valve.
4. Main electrical disconnect circuit breaker (breaker box/service panel).
5. Main drain line clean out.
6. Main water shut off valve.
7. All window and door exits.

In addition to the above, carry out the following monthly safety checks:
Some of these items may have already be included in the home maintenance list, but these monthly safety checks are advisable for safety reasons:
1. Test ground fault circuit interrupter receptacles(GFCI's).
2. Test smoke and carbon monoxide alarms and replace batteries if necessary.
3. Inspect and lubricate (if necessary) all emergency exits, including windows and doors.
4. Inspection of heating unit and water heater for visual integrity.

Estimated life spans of most Home appliance:

1.Dishwasher water valves: 3-7 years
2.Range and oven: 18-20 years
3.Garbage disposal: 10 years
4.Microwave: 10 years
5.Refrigerator: 18-20 years
6.Laundry washer: 14 years
7.Laundry drier: 14 years
8.Refrigerator/Freezer: 18-20 years
9.Central air conditioner system: 15 years
10.Window mounted air conditioning system: 8 years
11.Bathtub/Sink: 50 years
12.Garage door opener: 10 years
13.Laundry water fill hoses: 3-5 years
14.Trash compactor: 10 years

Invoice -- Single Family Inspection

Report #: 181114A
Inspection Date: 2018-08-04

Property Inspected For 
Sample Sampleson
123 Sample Rd. Sample Town, WA 99999

$0.00


Campion Home Inspection
C/O Dustin
424 N Sunnyside Ave
Sequim, WA 98382
(360) 928-5006