Company Information

Charles Buell Inspections INC

Phone: 206-478-7371
charles@buellinspections.com
http://www.buellinspections.com

Inspected by: Charles Buell
WA State Pest License #: 67488
WA State Home Inspector #: 220

The Scope and Purpose of a Home Inspection

Purchasing property involves risk

The purpose of a home inspection is to help reduce the risk associated with the purchase of a structure by providing a professional opinion about the overall condition of the structure. A home inspection is a limited visual inspection and it cannot eliminate this risk. Some homes present more risks than others. We cannot control this, but we try to help educate you about what we don’t know during the inspection process. This is more difficult to convey in a report and one of many reasons why we recommend that you attend the inspection.

Occasional typographical errors and other minor errors and omissions will occur in the report.  I apologize in advance for these.  If any of these typos make the report unclear, confusing or incomplete, please contact me immediately for clarification/correction.

A home inspection is not an insurance policy

This report does not substitute for or serve as a warranty or guarantee of any kind. Home warranties can be purchased separately from insuring firms that provide this service.

A home inspection is visual and not destructive

The descriptions and observations in this report are based on a visual inspection of the structure. We inspect the aspects of the structure that can be viewed without dismantling, damaging or disfiguring the structure and without moving furniture and interior furnishings. Areas that are concealed, hidden or inaccessible to view are not covered by this inspection. Some systems cannot be tested during this inspection as testing risks damaging the building. For example, overflow drains on bathtubs are generally not tested because if they were found to be leaking, they could damage the finishes below. Our procedures involve non-invasive investigation and non-destructive testing which will limit the scope of the inspection.

This is not an inspection for code compliance

This inspection and report are not intended for city / local code compliance. During the construction process structures are inspected for code compliance by municipal inspectors. Framing is open at this time and conditions can be fully viewed. Framing is not open during inspections of finished homes, and this limits the inspection. All houses fall out of code compliance shortly after they are built, as the codes continually change. National codes are augmented at least every three years for all of the varying disciplines. Municipalities can choose to adopt and phase in sections of the codes on their own timetables. There are generally no requirements to bring older homes into compliance unless substantial renovation is being done.

Environmental/Mold Exclusions

The reported or actual health effects of many potentially harmful, toxic or environmentally hazardous elements that may be found in building materials or in the air, soil, water in and/or around any house are varied, and, in some cases controversial.  A home inspection does not include the detection, identification or analysis of any such elements or related concerns such as, but not limited to, mold, allergens, legal/illegal drugs and other biological contaminants, radon, , bed bugs, cockroaches, fleas, lice, formaldehyde, asbestos, lead, electromagnetic fields, carbon monoxide, insecticides, Chinese drywall, refrigerants and fuel oils.  Furthermore, no evaluations are performed to determine the effectiveness or appropriateness of any method or system (e.g., water filter, radon mitigation, etc.), designed to prevent or remove any hazardous or unwanted materials or elements. An environmental health specialist should be contacted for evaluation of any potential health or environmental concerns.  The noting of the presence of materials commonly considered to contain asbestos, formaldehyde, lead, mold etc in the inspection report, should not be construed to mean the inspector is inspecting for these things but instead should be seen as a "heads-up" regarding these materials and further evaluation by qualified professional may be warranted.

This is just our opinion and just for you

The contents of this report are for the sole use of the client named above and no other person or party may rely on this report for any reason or purpose whatsoever without the prior written consent of the inspector who authored the report. Any person or party who chooses to rely on this report for any reason or purpose whatsoever without the express written consent of the inspector does so at their own risk and by doing so without the prior written consent of the inspector waives any claim of error or deficiency in this report.

Construction techniques and standards vary. There is no one way to build a house or install a system in a house. The observations in this report are the opinions of the home inspector. Other inspectors and contractors are likely to have some differing opinions. You are welcome to seek opinions from other professionals.

The scope of this inspection

The inspection and report are intended to provide the client with information regarding the condition of the systems and components of the property as observed at the time of the inspection.  The inspector examines the readily accessible systems and components using normal operating controls.  The inspection is not technically exhaustive and will not identify concealed conditions or latent defects.  Any comments offered by the INSPECTOR that could be construed as over or beyond the standards of practice or the language of this contract, are offered as a professional courtesy.  Refer to the Washington State, Standards of Practice and/or Pre-Inspection Agreement for additional information regarding the scope and limitations of the inspection.  The Standards of Practice are linked below and describe the "minimum" standards a Licensed Washington State Home Inspector must adhere to:

http://www.buellinspections.com/wa-state-standards-of-practice/

All homes are likely to have some faults which may range from cosmetic defects to major safety hazards.  Not all defects will be found.   While some minor deficiencies may be mentioned, the emphasis of this report is to inform the buyer of the property condition by detecting deficiencies or circumstances that may affect the structural integrity of the building and its components and its safe use as a residence.

You are encouraged to obtain competitive estimates for major repair needs.  Safety and health issues should be addressed promptly.  It is recommended that all corrective work, other than routine maintenance activities, be performed by qualified licensed contractors.

It is beyond the scope of the Standard Home Inspection to identify components within the home that may have been part of a "manufacturer's recall".  Mention of specific recalls within this report must not be construed to mean that all such items have been identified, or that such identification is part of a  Standard Home Inspection.  When possible, appliance Model Numbers and Serial Numbers are included in the report and can be used to check for recall related issues.  If you have any question about specific appliances, information can be found at the CPSC (Consumer Products Safety Commission) website:  http://www.cpsc.gov, or http://search.cpsc.gov/query.html or contact the manufacturer directly.

It is recommended that you obtain as much history as is available concerning this property. This historical information may include copies of any seller's disclosures, previous inspection or engineering reports, reports performed for or by relocation companies, municipal inspection departments, lenders, insurers and appraisers. You should attempt to determine whether repairs, renovation, remodeling, additions or other such activities have taken place at this property, and this report will attempt to identify such items when possible.

Ranges, Dish Washers, and Refrigerators (and the like) are typically tested for basic function (Do they turn on).  No assertions are made as to how well they function.  Microwave ovens, clothes washers/dryers are not operated.

Throughout this report, comments will be made as to the presence or absence of components or parts of components.  This must not be construed to mean that these components or parts of components exist (or don't exist) in concealed areas or behind finished surfaces.  For example: if foundation bolting was seen in one area, it does not mean that the bolting exists (or doesn't exist) in areas that are concealed.  Also if an item was noted as "not being visible," that should not be construed to mean that none of whatever was "not visible" does not exist on the premises---it just means none was noted at the time of inspection and should be seen as a "heads-up" that the concern or condition might be present but hidden, or that the conditions that would allow its presence to be known was not replicated at the time of inspection.

Many of the non-narrative observations/documentation detailed in the report that are related to more "cosmetic" issues should not be construed as "all inclusive" but should instead be seen in as "suggestive" or a "guideline" of conditions that may exist elsewhere in the home.  It is not the focus of the report to comment extensively on cosmetic issues, but I do make note of them at times to help complete the "snap-shot" of the home at the time of inspection.   For example, "nail-pops" seen in one room are likely to be seen (and should be anticipated) in other rooms even though I may not have noted them in the report.

Throughout the report I may make recommendations as to possible repairs.  These recommendations are not intended to be substitutes or construed to be more appropriate than the recommendations of the professionals making the repairs.  Conflicts in recommendations should be resolved prior to repairs being made.

Who should make repairs and what should their qualifications be?

Workman qualifications: In the text of the report, in some instances, I recommend that work be done by a "qualified" person or "qualified" parties. I consider qualified parties, in licensed trades, to be those individuals who hold the necessary licenses to legally work in their profession -- licensed electricians, licensed pest control applicators, licensed plumbers, licensed HVAC professionals, licensed engineers, licensed general contractors, etc. In instances where a task may not, typically, need to be done by a person with a license, my recommendation is to hire an individual to do the work who is, based on past training, experience or expertise, qualified to further evaluate the condition or problem listed in the report and to then make appropriate repairs.

For additional fees, this inspector can perform invasive inspection of concealed areas if desired. Please contact the inspector for more information regarding this service.

Photography/Infrared and Moisture meters used

Digital photographs, thermographs and illustrations may be included in this report.  If included, their purpose is to better illustrate an observation or recommendation.  No degree of importance should be inferred by the presence or absence of photos and illustrations.  Some pictures will undergo lightening, darkening, cropping and have callouts and other "overlays" present, but the image itself will not be altered unless specifically noted on the picture.  The use of infrared thermography (IR) must not be construed to mean that a full thermal survey of the structure was done.  The use of IR is primarily for recording thermal differences to show the function or lack of function of heating and cooling of HVAC equipment; and, anomalies associated with temperature differences sometimes produced by water leaks, air infiltration etc. IR during a home inspection is mainly a qualitative evaluation and, in most cases, "thermal tuning" will not have been performed and therefor temperatures present on any thermal images in the report should not be seen as an absolute temperature but only "relative temperature."

Throughout the report, reference may be made to moisture conditions and percentages of moisture content.  These moisture readings are obtained by the use of a Protimeter, Surveymaster Moisture Meter or the Extech MO55 or the Tramex  MEP.

Your participation is requested

Your presence is requested during this inspection. A written report will not substitute for all the possible information that can be conveyed verbally by a shared visual observation of the conditions of the property. If you were not present during the inspection, you are urged to contact the inspector for a verbal consultation.  If you choose not to consult with the inspector, the inspection company cannot be responsible for misinterpretation of the report.

How to Read This Report

Getting the Information to You

This report is designed to deliver important and technical information in a way that is easy for anyone to access and understand. If you are in a hurry, you can take a quick look at our "Summary Page” and quickly get critical information for important decision making. However, we strongly recommend that you take the time to read the full Report, which includes digital photographs, captions, diagrams, videos and hot links to additional information.

The best way to get the layers of information that are presented in this report is to read your report online. This will allow all you to expand your learning about your house. You will notice some words or series of words highlighted in blue and underlined – clicking on these will provide you with a link to additional information.

This report can also be printed on paper or to a PDF document.

Chapters and Sections

This report is divided into chapters that parcel the home into logical inspection components. Each chapter is broken into sections that relate to a specific system or component of the home. You can navigate between chapters with the click of a button on the left side margin.

Most sections will contain some descriptive information done in black font. Observation narrative, done in colored boxes, will be included if a system or component is found to be significantly deficient in some way or if we wish to provide helpful additional information about the system or the scope of our inspection. If a system or component of the home was deemed to be in satisfactory or serviceable condition, there may be no narrative observation comments in that section.

Observation Labels

All narrative observations are colored, numbered and labeled to help you find, refer to, and understand the severity of the observation. Observation colors and labels used in this report are:

  • Major Concern:
    Repair items that may cost significant money to correct now or in the near future, or items that require immediate attention to prevent additional damage or eliminate safety hazards.
  • Repair:
    Repair and maintenance items noted during inspection. Please note that some repair items can be expensive to correct such as re-finishing hardwood floors, but are considered simply repair items due to their cosmetic nature.
  • Improve:
    Observations that are not necessarily defects, but which could be improved for safety, efficiency, or reliability reasons.
  • Monitor:
    Items that should be watched to see if correction may be needed in the future.
  • Due Diligence:
    Observation such as a buried oil tank that may require further investigation to determine the severity and / or urgency of repair.
  • Future Project:
    A repair that may be deferred for some time but should be on the radar for repair or replacement in the near future.
  • Efficiency:
    Denotes observations that are needed to make the home more energy efficient as well as to bring the home up to modern insulation standards. This category typically includes windows and insulation. Other items, such as lighting and appliances, are not inspected for their energy status.
  • Completed:
    Items that were initially an issue but have since been completed.
  • Note:
    Refers to aside information and /or any comments elaborating on descriptions of systems in the home or limitations to the home inspection.

Summary Page

Potentially significant findings are summarized below.  A "Significant Finding" is defined as a substantial safety hazard;  or, a deficiency requiring a major short-term expense to correct or possible significant expense in the future if not addressed.  This summary is not a complete listing of the findings in the report and reflects the  opinion of the inspector.  It should be considered highly likely there will be other issues you would like in the summary, and you should add these as desired.  Please review all of the report pages.  All repairs must be done by the applicable qualified, licensed & bonded trade or profession.  I recommend obtaining receipts and warranties for the work done (including copies of any necessary permits).

Many of these Narrative comments in the Summary have pictures and web links that better clarify the issues.  Please refer to their place in the report body for additional clarification/information.  Lack of information under any given component only means that, in my opinion, there was nothing in the body of the report that warranted posting it to the Summary.  There will certainly be valuable information under each applicable component in the body of the report.

Summary

Repairs

  • (G-5) Grounds:

    In discussing the drain location at the East side of the home, the site manager said this collects roof water and drains the water to a dry-well under the lawn east of the patio. I recommend discussing this with the seller/builder to your satisfaction.

  • (BE-1) Building Exterior:

    At the patio and at the front porch there is trim located too close to the ground/concrete. This will lead to decay/rot over time. There should be proper clearance between the concrete and the wood but repairs may not be warranted until and if damage occurs. These are well protected areas and it may not be a problem. Discuss with the builder/seller to your satisfaction.

  • (AG-6) Attached Garage:

    The door between the house and the garage does not seal properly at the top strike side and daylight is visible when closed. This will allow air from the garage to move into the home under negative pressure. I recommend bringing this to the attention of the builder/seller for proper repairs.

  • (AG-8) Attached Garage:

    At the north side of the overhead door there is a large piece of concrete that has broken away from the foundation. While not a structural concern, and it being well covered at the exterior, this may not be a concern. Discuss with builder/seller to your satisfaction.

  • (RA-2) Roof/Attic:

    The shingles installed on the shed dormer that covers the stairwell area are a different type of shingle from the rest of the home. I cannot determine if they have the same life expectancy. I recommend discussing with the builder/seller why they are different and whether they have the same life expectancy or not. Typically they do not have the same life expectancy, but that can vary with manufacturer. I also was not able to determine if two layers of underlayment were installed for this slope as required. Discuss this with the builder/seller as well.

  • (E-7) Electrical:

    Where the service entrance wires run into the panel in conduit, from underground, the conduit has not been properly sealed.  This can allow for moisture, vermin and considerable air/soil gas infiltration.  I recommend evaluation/repairs and/or replacement as deemed necessary by a licensed electrical contractor in the context of other electrical repairs at the home.

    NEC 300.50(F) Raceway Seal. Where a raceway enters from an underground system, the end within the building shall be sealed with an identified compound so as to prevent the entrance of moisture or gases.

  • (P-1) Plumbing:

    Several water meters were noted at west side of the property but determining which one goes with this property could not be determined at the time of inspection.  I recommend asking builder/seller where the meter is located.  Numbers on the meters compared with numbers on water bills can be used to determine which meter goes with this home.

  • (P-2) Plumbing:

    No water shut-off was found within the home.  This is not uncommon.  Water to the home can always be shut off at the street/meter.  As an upgrade,  I recommend having a licensed plumber install a shut-off inside the home for convenience unless it is determined that there is already one somewhere.  I recommend asking seller if they know of an inside shut-off.

  • (P-3) Plumbing:

    Water heaters installed after the year 2006 in most jurisdictions (and certainly this one) require installation of an expansion tank (or expansion device) on the plumbing system whenever there is any type of back-flow valve, pressure reducing valve ahead of the water heating equipment. Sometimes the water meter creates a closed system. Discuss with the builder/seller as to whether the home is on a closed system or not. If it is determined that the home is a "closed system" installation of an expansion tank/device would be required by the water heater manufacturer. See water heater section below.

  • (P-13) Plumbing:

    There is some TracPipe, Counterstrike type stainless steel flexible gas pipe in the home. There are maximum amounts that the covering can be cut back and at one location it appears to be cut back too far. I recommend evaluation/repairs by a licensed plumber. There is repair tape for these kinds of repairs. The end at the fireplace should also be checked and repaired if needed.

  • (P-14) Plumbing:

    Water heaters installed after the year 2006 in most jurisdictions (and certainly this one) require installation of an expansion tank (or expansion device) on the plumbing system whenever there is any type of back-flow valve, pressure reducing valve ahead of the water heating equipment.  Missing thermal expansion devices can be an indication of work done by unqualified individuals, without proper permits or that it has been verified that there is no other means of back flow prevention including the water meter.  I recommend further evaluation/repairs by a licensed plumber.

  • (P-16) Plumbing:

    At the time of inspection the vent/air intake cap for the water heater located on the south side of the home was backwards. A repair person made repairs at the time of inspection but proper repairs should be verified.

  • (HC-12) Heating, Cooling:

    At the electrical panel there is a required (mandatory) energy information sticker that has yet to be fully filled out. I recommend bringing this to the attention of the builder/seller for proper completion. This Information Sticker records the results of the "required" blower door test, the results of the "required" duct testing as well as other energy features of the home. It is not likely that the house certificate of occupancy can be granted until this form is complete.

  • (HC-13) Heating, Cooling:

    I could not determine how air is brought into the home for the air exchange fan located in the laundry room. There is a timer for control of the fan and general infiltration may be relied on for air replacement when the fan is running.  I recommend consulting with the licensed heating contractor to determine source of air and make repairs if deemed necessary.  With no air intake the house can become depressurized resulting in pulling air/moisture into the building envelope where it might do concealed damage. See information below regarding a second air change system.

  • (HC-14) Heating, Cooling:

    There is an inline fan under the kitchen area that draws air from the exterior and pushes it through the furnace and ductwork into the home. This may work in conjunction with the "air" setting on the furnace and/or may be tied into the high speed setting of the kitchen exhaust fan. I recommend discussing both of these systems with the builder/seller to gain an understanding of exactly how the systems work and how they are maintained and should be used. The screened intake at the south side of the home needs cleaning as it is beginning to be impacted with leaves and debris. Ongoing, this screen needs to be maintained free of debris.

  • (D2-1) Door #2:

    The Slider Door at the east patio does not lock properly.  I recommend bringing this to the attention of the builder/seller for adjustments by qualified repair person to allow for proper locking of the door.

  • (S-1) Stairs:

    There are staples sticking through the carpet at each tread at the riser. This can cause injury to persons using the chairs. these points can be hammered over by a qualified party or other repairs may be possible. This recommendation applies to all of the stairs. I recommend evaluation/repairs by a qualified party.

  • (MB-5) Master Bathroom:

    Two of the bathroom exhaust vents have debris stuck in the termination caps that is preventing full closure of the vent flaps. I recommend that all be checked by a qualified party and repaired as warranted. Discuss with the builder/seller to your satisfaction.

  • (UHB-1) Upper Hallway Bathroom:

    There are large mirrors in all of the bathrooms that do not have any exposed clips. Mirrors, over time, can fail catastrophically without clips as adhesives fail. Bring this to the attention of the builder/seller for repairs or assurances to your satisfaction that the installation is adequate.

  • (UHB-3) Upper Hallway Bathroom:

    There is no curtain rod in the Upper Hallway Bathroom and no determination is made as to whether this should be provided or not. Discuss with the builder to your satisfaction.

  • (K1-9) Kitchen:

    When the range hood exhaust is more than 400 CFM, and building air changes are less than 5ACH50, a mechanical means (fan activated electronic damper) of bringing fresh air into the home in conjunction with operation of the unit is required by modern standards.

    • M1503.6 Makeup air required. Where one or more gas, liquid or solid fuel-burning appliance that is neither direct-vent nor uses a mechanical draft venting system is located within a dwelling unit’s air barrier, each exhaust system capable of exhausting in excess of 400 cubic feet per minute shall be mechanically or passively provided with makeup air at a rate approximately equal to the exhaust air rate. Such makeup air systems shall be equipped with not fewer than one damper complying with Section M1503.6.2.
    • M1503.6.2 Makeup air dampers. Where makeup air is required makeup air dampers shall comply with this section. Each damper shall be a gravity damper or an electrically operated damper that automatically opens when the exhaust system operates. Dampers shall be located to allow access for inspection, service, repair and replacement without removing permanent construction or any other ducts not connected to the damper being inspected, serviced, repaired or replaced. Gravity or barometric dampers shall not be used in passive makeup air systems except where the dampers are rated to provide the design makeup airflow at a pressure differential 3 Pascals or less.
  • (K1-11) Kitchen:

    There is no screen installed as required on the cooktop exhaust fan/hood at the east exterior of the home.  I do not like screens on this location but they are required.  If one is going to be installed it would be better to install it on the outside of the damper.  They are prone to clogging with lint/grease over time.  Maintenance is necessary regardless.  Bring to the attention of the builder for possible replacement/repairs is recommended.  Also it was noted that the cap does not appear to be properly connected to the duct and collection of grease and lint is possible and also make cleaning problematic. There appears to be some sort of plastic materials inside the cap as well. I recommend bringing this to the attention of the builder/seller for repairs by a qualified party.

Improves

  • (RA-10) Roof/Attic:

    When upper roof downspouts terminate at lower roof surfaces the additional water running across the lower roof can pre-maturely age the roof.  I recommend that the downspouts be extended across the roof surface or that the downspouts be relocated as necessary by a licensed gutter installation company to prevent the pre-mature ageing of the roof surface (There are also roof trays that can be installed to channel the water to the lower gutter.  These have the advantage of not clogging).

  • (F-2) Fireplaces:

    There is no blower installed on the fireplace.  This is common.  I recommend adding fan.  The life expectancy of these units is much greater when used in conjunction with the fan component.  Consult with manufacturer of unit and/or licensed fireplace installation company.

  • (MLRA-1) Main Living Room Area(s):

    In the context of a home inspection it is not typically possible to determine how adequately closet shelving is installed and whether the installation will support weight or how much weight.  The following comments and recommendations apply to any closets in the home that have built-in shelving. Manufacturers have different requirements for installation but most have specific requirements for installation on drywall, on wall studs and/or on concrete.  Brackets solely supported on the drywall typically are required to have mollies that expand considerably inside the wall behind the drywall.  Evaluation of proper support would typically require the removal of some screws and or verifying attachment to studs.  Collapse of improperly installed shelving units is common and personal injury or property damage could result.

    It was determined at the time of inspection--by tapping on the walls along the shelving, and by thermal imaging--that the brackets are NOT attached to the studs or to very few studs, and further evaluation of the installation is advised.  I recommend evaluation/repairs and/or replacement as deemed necessary by a qualified party.

  • (K1-1) Kitchen:

    The overhanging countertop at the island is not supported by corbels. For improved safety I recommend proper corbels be installed. It is common for people to stand or sit on these overhangs and I suspect it might be possible to break the edge off. Make improvements on your own or discuss with builder/seller as desired.

  • (L-3) Laundry:

    The louver type vent cap at the exterior are problematic in that the heat from the dryer tends to deform the louvers so that they don't open properly.  Replacement of this type of cap with a type with a single flap is recommended.

  • (L-5) Laundry:

    Washing machines located on finished floors should have trays to prevent damage from flooding. When possible it is also recommended that the tray have a drain to the exterior to prevent overflow of the tray.  High water alarms can be installed to monitor trays without drains.  There are many manufacturers of these trays and some trays are better than others.  Inexpensive and flimsy trays should be avoided as damaged trays or trays with poor drain connections may provide no more protection against flooding than if there was no tray at all.

Due Diligences

  • (AG-3) Attached Garage:

    When operating the overhead door manually, the spring tension is such that the door tends to roll toward open as opposed to being "balanced" and not roll in either direction. This is merely an adjustment of the spring mechanism which should be done in the context of the automatic opener installation. No further recommendation at this time.

  • (K1-4) Kitchen:

    Many modern gas ranges have auto-relight functions for the burners.  In the event that a gust of wind were to blow out the flame--especially when adjusted very low--the re-light function allows the burner to re-light itself for safety.  This particular unit does not appear to have that function and no determination is made as to whether it can be added or not.  Upgrade/modify as desired.  No further recommendation at this time.

Efficiencies

  • (HC-10) Heating, Cooling:

    A permanent certificate shall be completed by the builder or registered design professional and posted on a wall in the space where the furnace is located, a utility room, or an approved location inside the building. When located on an electrical panel, the certificate shall not cover or obstruct the visibility of the circuit directory label, service disconnect label, or other required labels. The certificate shall list the predominant R-values of insulation installed in or on ceiling/roof, walls, foundation (slab, below-grade wall, and/or floor) and ducts outside conditioned spaces; U-factors for fenestration and the solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) of fenestration, and the results from any required duct system and building envelope air leakage testing done on the building. Where there is more than one value for each component, the certificate shall list the value covering the largest area. The certificate shall list the types and efficiencies of heating, cooling and service water heating equipment. Where a gas-fired unvented room heater, electric furnace, or baseboard electric heater is installed in the residence, the certificate shall list "gas-fired unvented room heater," "electric furnace" or "baseboard electric heater," as appropriate. An efficiency shall not be listed for gas-fired unvented room heaters, electric furnaces or electric baseboard heaters. (R401.3)

  • (HC-11) Heating, Cooling:

    Blower Door Test Results: The building or dwelling unit shall be tested and verified as having an air leakage rate of not exceeding 5 air changes per hour (WA State Amendment to the Energy Code). Testing shall be conducted with a blower door at a pressure of 0.2 inches w.g. (50 Pascals).

    • The 4.30 ACH-50, recorded on the Energy Information sheet is consistent with compliance for air leakage.

    Duct Testing, Rough-in Test: Total leakage shall be less than or equal to 4 cfm per 100 square feet of conditioned floor area when tested at a pressure differential of 25 Pascals across the system, including the manufacturer's air handler enclosure.

    1. Test target 161.6 CFM@25Pascals meets the test results of 148 CFM@25Pascals.

Notes

  • (GC-1) General Comments:

    In the report there may be instances where specific building codes, other standards and manufacturer's instructions may be specifically quoted. This in no way should be construed to mean this inspection is a code compliance inspection or that all manufacturer's instructions are known or checked. These instances are only provided as a courtesy in assisting with specific instances. There may be other exceptions to these examples that are also applicable and a full evaluation by the appropriate trade is recommended.

  • (K1-8) Kitchen:

    The refrigerator is currently connected to the AFCI protected Circuit as required. I recommend that a power outage alarm being installed to avoid thawing of food due to inadvertent tripping of the AFCI circuit.

  • (LBNL1-1) Last-But-Not_Least:

    THINGS FOR BUYERS TO THINK ABOUT: Ask seller for:

    • samples or records of paint colors used on the premises.
    • copies of construction records/permits.
    • all available owner's manuals for: Furnace, Thermostats, Appliances, Fan Timers, Remote Control Devices, Gas Fireplaces, Gas Cooktops, Fire Suppression System, Alarm Security System, Water Heaters etc.
    • Obtain keys/combinations to all locks.
  • (LBNL1-2) Last-But-Not_Least:

    • Get minutes of Homeowner Association meetings.

General Property Info

Building Characteristics / Conditions

Type of Building Single Family (3-story)

Approximate Square Footage 3,660

Approximate Year of Original Construction 2019

Attending the Inspection Buyer/Client, Agents representative

Occupancy Unoccupied, but staged with furniture

Weather during the inspection Clear

Approximate temperature during the inspection 50° F ± 5°

Ground/Soil surface conditions Damp

Days since last significant rainfall Several days

General Comments

Building Characteristics / Conditions

All Reports Re-inspections

When repairs are made on the home, I recommend that I be called back to verify that corrections have been satisfactorily made. A minimum assessment of $250.00 will be charged for each Work Order Evaluation Inspection that is requested that I conduct. Additional charges will accrue for anything in writing, beyond an email response, and for evaluations at more than 20 miles travel time--these costs to be agreed upon at the time of the request for further evaluation. REMEDIAL WORK – For any element or condition requiring attention, quotes should be obtained prior to closing from qualified specialists or contractors to determine actual repair/replacement costs.  Any cost estimates provided, whether oral or written, represent only an approximation of possible costs.  Also, any cost estimates do not reflect all possible remedial needs or costs for the property; latent concerns or consequential damage may exist.  If the need for remedial work develops or is uncovered after the inspection, contact Charles Buell Inspections, Inc. to arrange an inspection to assess conditions prior to performing any repairs.

  • IF THERE ARE ITEMS WITHIN THIS REPORT THAT REQUIRE RE-INSPECTION, YOU ARE ENCOURAGED TO HAVE ME COMMUNICATE DIRECTLY WITH THOSE HIRED TO MAKE THE CORRECTIONS TO ENSURE THAT REPAIRS ARE PROPERLY MADE.
  • There are many things that can be done to improve safety and living conditions within any home. While many of these issues come to light in the course of the Standard Home Inspection there are likely to be other things that can be done to improve the home. Additional information can be found at: Center for Healthy Living

Residential Homes General Information

In the course of the inspection I am looking for obvious, and not so obvious, clues as to problems with components or systems. At times a repair can be as expensive as replacement and sometimes additional problems or damage are found when work begins. In fact, a defect in one system or component can cause a related problem at another location that was not apparent at the time of the inspection. It is recommended that prior to closing the client have in hand -- at a minimum -- estimates from specialists for service/repairs or replacement/upgrades of any components or systems that may be potentially costly, dangerous or complex to fix or replace. If repairs are completed prior to closing, the client minimizes the chances of any unexpected surprises after closing. In performing one's due diligence, it is important the client not only follow through on the recommendations I make in this report but any other concerns that may arise in the course of the transaction. This report should never be taken as an end in itself but merely part of the ""process"" of due diligence.

  • While on-site, all professional repair people should be asked to further evaluate the condition of the system, structural components or device that he or she is working on. Often one problem will lead to another related issue which can require further repairs or replacement. If remodeling is done, where walls and ceilings are opened, wallpaper removed, homeowners may find some concealed issues that will also have to be addressed during the remodel. Because the home inspector is a generalist, this policy further protects the client.

Property lines What are the property boundaries?

Determining the location of property boundary lines is beyond the scope of a Standard Home Inspection and can typically only be determined by a licensed surveyor.

Having Repairs Done at the home

All construction work performed under these specifications must meet standard, good construction practices as to quality of workmanship and materials. Pest control measures must be performed by state licensed applicators in conformance with all current federal, state and local laws. A fee of $250.00 will be charged for each re-inspection (and agreed upon additional costs will apply to re-inspections more than 10 miles travel).

Covenants/Easements/Encumbrances Are present

Properties sometimes have covenants and easements and other encumbrances associated with them. This inspection makes no attempt at identifying or providing information regarding any such issues, but will mention observed "community" issues that may affect the property. I recommend discussing any such concerns with the seller. Typical concerns include, but are not limited to: utility easements, height restrictions, maintenance of underground drainage, etc. No determination is made as to whether this property is part of a homeowner association.

New Construction Has no history, Cosmetic issues, Industry Standards, Cosmetic issues for builder

Because newly constructed homes have no "history," components that at the time of inspection appear satisfactory may over the first few years develop concerns that aren't apparent at the initial inspection. Prior to the One-Year Warranty date, I recommend that I be called back to perform a second inspection of the home. Typically the cost of this inspection is the same as the original inspection (given no major changes to the home since the first inspection).

Like all homes, new homes are likely to have cosmetic flaws. I recommend that you carefully survey the home for any cosmetic issues that you want brought to the attention of the builder for repair. While outside the scope of this inspection, I will throughout the inspection point out cosmetic defects as I see them but make no attempt to discover all defects or make any determination as to what should be corrected and what should not.

In newly constructed homes, there are often questions about how to determine whether work done was done to "industry standards" in terms of quality and function. There can be a very wide range of what is considered "acceptable" and the following link can provide some guidance as to what should be expected. NAHB Construction Performance Guidelines

There are some cosmetic defects and/or components in the process of installation/completion--both inside and outside the home. No attempt is made to identify all of these issues but will be mentioned in relation to more serious concerns throughout the report. Confirming completion of unfinished components with builder to your satisfaction is recommended.

Storage/Belongings In House, Garage

There was some storage and belongings throughout the home that made observation of covered surfaces difficult. The chances that hidden defects will be found when the home is emptied is possible. For a more complete opinion of the overall condition of the home I recommend further evaluation of the home when the house is vacated.

There was much storage and belongings in the garage that made observation of covered surfaces virtually impossible. The chances that hidden defects will be found when the detached structure is emptied is possible, including electrical issues. For a more complete opinion of the overall condition I recommend further evaluation of the space when the garage is vacated.

Codes, Standards and Manufacturer's instructions General guidance

(GC-1) Note:

In the report there may be instances where specific building codes, other standards and manufacturer's instructions may be specifically quoted. This in no way should be construed to mean this inspection is a code compliance inspection or that all manufacturer's instructions are known or checked. These instances are only provided as a courtesy in assisting with specific instances. There may be other exceptions to these examples that are also applicable and a full evaluation by the appropriate trade is recommended.

Grounds

Topography and Conditions around the building

GEOLOGICAL FACTORS What about the land the house is built on?

This report does not include evaluation of any soils or geological conditions/concerns. Construction on certain soils, particularly expansive clays, fill soils, hillside and waterfront areas, necessitate special design consideration. Evaluation of these factors, or the need for them, is beyond the scope of this inspection. Pertinent information should be obtained from local officials and/or a qualified specialists, particularly if any concerns are detected or if the home is in a detrimental soils area.

PROPERTY DRAINAGE What about the property drainage?

To maintain proper drainage away from the structure, soil adjacent to the foundation should slope at least 1 inch per foot for five feet away from the building. Paved areas should slope at least 1/4 inch per foot. Control of surface drainage is critical to keeping basements and crawl spaces dry. A clearance of 6 inches should be maintained from the soil to the bottom of wood siding or trim on the building, unless the material is pressure treated wood or other material approved for ground contact. Swales around buildings can help manage water and reduce its impact on the building.

Site Conditions/Locations Below the surface conditions not determined

Sometimes the surface around the home appears to slope properly but fill has been added on top of surfaces that actually slope toward the foundation. While this cannot be observed at the time of an inspection, moisture conditions in the interior of the basement may be related to this type of improper drainage. Underlying soils below the finish surface (grass etc) should slope properly away from the home and be relatively impermeable.

Low Slope House on Low Slope, portions of property flat

Homes on low slopes with areas that are flat can have water related issues that can not be adequately predicted or observed in a Standard Home Inspection. Vigilant monitoring of the sub-surface spaces (and the grading around the home) is recommended.  Water intrusions/conditions should be evaluated/repaired by a licensed drainage installation company that utilizes the services of a licensed geo-technical engineer.

East side of property borders on Green Belt area

Drainage Systems

Underground Pipe Drainage Systems Deferred to Homeowner Association

Exterior surface drains noted at South side of home, Point of termination not determined

Tight-line drains Tight-line drains are for the collection of roof water independent of footing drains., Tight-line drain point of termination not determined, Reportedly terminates at drywell in East yard

Downspout/underground pipe terminations Drain point of termination not determined, Location or appropriateness of drain pipe termination not determined

Footing drains Footing drain point of termination not determined, Location or appropriateness of footing drain pipe termination not determined, Presence of footing drain pipes not determined

(G-5) Repair:

In discussing the drain location at the East side of the home, the site manager said this collects roof water and drains the water to a dry-well under the lawn east of the patio. I recommend discussing this with the seller/builder to your satisfaction.

Vegetation on Property

Vegetation Satisfactorily maintained away from the house/building

Patios

Concrete Patio at East side of home, Patio surface materials installed over and/or too close to (Wood trim)

Patio Drainage Patio maintenance, Properly drained away from home

A patio surface in the Northwest can become very slippery and represents a hazard for anyone walking on it.  I recommend routine maintenance of the surface to keep it free of debris and slippery conditions. Cracks should be sealed to prevent moisture from further damaging the surface.

Cracks in patio surfaces, when they occur, should be maintained well sealed to prevent damage from water intrusion.

Patio Roof Patio Roof Structure (Included in Roof Section (part of House roof), Gable), Roof Support structures, Support structures: (Wrapped posts--methods of attachment not visible, Painted Wood), Trim components in contact with, or covered by, concrete

Driveways/Walkways/Flatwork

Vehicle Access to Property Driveway

Driveway Materials Concrete, Cracks at expansion joints

Street Sidewalk Concrete

Walkways Concrete

Fences

Fences Present, Not inspected

Fences around the property are generally excluded from the Standard Home Inspection. However, some information is provided as a courtesy and points of connection to the home itself are inspected. Fences can represent safety issues when they become damaged, derelict or otherwise compromised. Wood decay/rot is common. It also typically cannot be determined who actually owns the fence and communication with neighbors is often necessary to accomplish repairs and/or replacement. Specific evaluation of the fences on the property may be warranted.

Limitations/Exclusions Related to Grounds

Limitations and Exclusions No recent rains, Standard Home Inspection Exclusions

-In the absence of rain, consideration must be given to the possibility that drainage function cannot be adequately assessed; and, indications of past conditions or damage from moisture may not be evident.

A Standard Home Inspection does not include evaluation of elements such as site lighting, irrigation systems, fencing,landscaping retaining structures, retaining walls, and/or recreational elements on the site. Evaluation of these elements, if present, may be warranted, any comments made or made as a courtesy, whether done verbally or included in the written report.

Wood Destroying Organisms and Conducive Conditions Related to the Grounds

Conditions Conducive to WDO's around the grounds Conditions Present, Trim too close to concrete surfaces of patio

The items listed here were present at the time of inspection, additional information/recommendations can be found in the body of the report preceding this general listing of issues.

Building Exterior

Exterior Walls

Exterior Wall Structure Wall structure (Wood Frame, 2x6 wood wall construction, Make-up of most wall structures could not be determined due to finishes)

House Numbers/Letters Identification House Numbers/Letters (Numbers present on house)

Visibility Visible from street, House location/address not found by GPS--Nearest cross streets only

Building Sheathing present

OSB Typical of time of construction, Visible at gable ends of attic, Visible through grounding access ports

Non-wood Siding/Cladding

Fiber Cement Cladding Manufacturer not determined

Horizontal and Shake Lap Horizontal Lap, Butt joints appear to be flashed properly (only one or two joints checked at random)

Surface Finishes Painted, no paint failure seen

Penetrations larger than 1-1/2" in diameter At the following locations

Hose Faucets Block present, Flashing (present, Proper gap between siding and flashing)

HVAC/air intakes vents Blocks present two locations, Flashing (present, Proper gap between siding and flashing)

Artificial Stone Cladding Methods of installation typically cannot be determined in the course of a Standard Home Inspection, no issues noted

Trim / Eaves / Soffits

General Information Open soffits with exposed rafters and vented bird-blocking, West side of home only, Non-vented soffits for fire-separation (solid bird-blocking), Barge rafter (ends flashed with shingles and diverter flashings present

Wood Trim/Soffits Trim behind/in-contact-with/too close to concrete structures at (Patio and Support posts at patio)

Surface Finishes Painted (No paint failure noted)

Flashings Horizontal banding-flashing (present), Horizontal trim flashings around support posts (present, missing at some locations), Window head-flashing (present), Crawl Space Vent Flashings (present)

Conducive Conditions related to trim/eaves/soffits Some siding in contact with concrete structures

(BE-1) Repair:

At the patio and at the front porch there is trim located too close to the ground/concrete. This will lead to decay/rot over time. There should be proper clearance between the concrete and the wood but repairs may not be warranted until and if damage occurs. These are well protected areas and it may not be a problem. Discuss with the builder/seller to your satisfaction.

Attached Garage

Types of Parking Structures on Property

Type of Parking Structure Attached Garage (2 car bays (1 door))

Garage Foundation included in house foundation

Garage Exterior Siding & Trim Included in house siding and trim

Garage Roof & Roof Drainage Included in house roof and roof drainage

Garage Windows Included in house windows

Garage Electrical Included in House Electrical

Garage Plumbing Included in house plumbing

Garage Floor

Garage Floor Concrete

Cracks Some shrinkage cracks typical of all concrete floors

Slope of floor Down toward vehicle door(s)

Overhead Door

Overhead Door Partially inspected

Door Materials / Condition Metal

Door Jambs/Trim Top and Sides Weather-stripping: (Present)

Hardware & Warning Labels Spring Assembly Warning Label (Present), Bottom Bracket Warning Labels (Present), Lift handle (Present)

No Automatic Opener Manual operation/Door Balance (Door operated up-and-down normally/easily, Rolled open from the 3-4 feet above the floor position), Security mechanisms (Locking mechanisms not tested, Manual lock present), Wiring for future opener is present

You should be able to lift the door smoothly and with little resistance. It should stay open around three or four feet above the floor. If it does not, it is out of adjustment. Have it adjusted by a qualified service person.

Automatic Opener none present

Testing Protocols For when it is installed, How to test and inspect your overhead door

For additional information on proper maintenance and testing of garage doors see: Overhead Door DASMA Testing Protocols and the attached inspection checklists.

(AG-3) Due Diligence:

When operating the overhead door manually, the spring tension is such that the door tends to roll toward open as opposed to being "balanced" and not roll in either direction. This is merely an adjustment of the spring mechanism which should be done in the context of the automatic opener installation. No further recommendation at this time.

Garage/House Door

Garage/House Door Requirements for fire separation, 20-minute fire-rated door (Rating certification sticker NOT seen--should be verified, Wood/wood composite)

The garage/house door is has fire-separation requirements it must meet.  The door should be a solid wood door not less than 1-3/8 inches thick, a solid or honeycomb-core steel door not less than 1-3/8 inches thick, or 20-minute fire-rated door.  All doors between the house and the garage are required to have a self-closure device. It should also be weather-stripped at threshold, sides and top.  Improper doors can allow fumes from the garage to enter the home.

Auto-Closure Device Automatic closer device is present, Door closed and latched itself from 1/2 way open position

Conditions Jamb/Opening (Door not "aligned" properly in Jamb--consistent with poor installation and/or settlement)

Weather-Stripping Present on top and sides, Type of weather-stripping (Foam Compression Type Weather Strip, Door does not close tight against weather-stripping--day-light shows), Bottom of door weather-stripping (Weather-stripping is present on bottom of door)

Ghosting from air leakage at weather-stripping around the door is consistent with door not closing tightly against the weather-stripping and is indicative of a place of air leakage when the house is under negative and/or positive pressure.

Hinges No defects noted

Lockset & Security Mechanisms no door locking mechanisms present

(AG-6) Repair:

The door between the house and the garage does not seal properly at the top strike side and daylight is visible when closed. This will allow air from the garage to move into the home under negative pressure. I recommend bringing this to the attention of the builder/seller for proper repairs.

Garage Interiors

Walls/Ceilings/Floors Appears to be fire-resistant Surfaces (actual thickness not determined)

Walls and ceilings that separate the garage from living space are required to be constructed of fire-resistant materials. These requirements for abutting walls, ceilings, and doors are intended to reduce the spread of gasoline fires to living areas.


While materials may be "described" in the report, it is beyond the scope of a Standard Home Inspection to determine if the particular materials installed on the walls and ceilings of garages meet past/present fire-resistant surface requirements. Any concerns should be addressed by the local jurisdiction.

(AG-8) Repair:

At the north side of the overhead door there is a large piece of concrete that has broken away from the foundation. While not a structural concern, and it being well covered at the exterior, this may not be a concern. Discuss with builder/seller to your satisfaction.

Crawl Space Foundation

Crawl Space Footings/Foundation/Access

Crawl Space Access/Limitations General maintenance, Inspection Method (Traversed to all corners)

While the inspector takes care to protect the home from debris that might be inevitably carried out of the crawl space, some amount of impact should always be anticipated, as crawl spaces are often very dusty, dirty, muddy, rodent infested, and cob web filled spaces. Most of these materials are easily vacuumed up and typically the inspector is at the property to inspect the crawl space and the inspector should not be expected to have the equipment necessary to clean these materials up satisfactorily.

Closet Access Under Stairs, Insulation & Weather-stripping (Present)

Crawl Space Foundation Footings Poured Concrete

Crawl Space Foundation Type of foundation (Poured Concrete Foundation/Stem Wall), Conditions (Metal form cross-ties present)

Some vertical cracks in foundation walls are common, and generally indicate typical foundation settlement. Cracks in excess of 1/4 inch, or signs of active foundation movement should be further evaluated by a structural engineer.
It is usually not possible to determine whether masonry foundations, chimneys or other concrete elements have been properly reinforced.
It is usually not possible to determine whether concrete elements have been properly reinforced.

Cracks Some shrinkage cracks typical of all concrete foundations

Efflorescence in Crawl Space None to Minimal

Foundation Sill Plate Treated foundation sill plate

Foundation Anchors Bolts (Foundation sill plate bolted)

Crawl Space Building Floor System Floor System Framing, Dirt Floor

It is outside the scope of a Standard Home Inspection to determine the load capabilities of floor systems.   When heavy objects are to be located within the home (like pianos, waterbeds, etc) care must be taken, and determinations made as to the load capabilities of the floors where heavy objects are to be located.

Wood Joists Wood Joists: 2x10, 16"oc

Support Posts Bottom attachment (Present), Top Attachment (Present), Pressure Treated Support Posts, Clearances to Floor system (Adequate clearance to floor system--more than 18"), Clearances to Beams (Adequate clearance to wood beams--more than 12")

Crawl Space Blocking/Draft-stopping Not determined, due to insulation in place

Gravity Drains None seen

Gravity drains are installed through the foundation at the low point of the crawl space to drain water out of the crawl space during construction and will drain water from the crawl space after construction if they remain connected to the drain system. These drains are also known to admit water to the crawl space when drainage systems back up and to also be a point of entry for vermin. No determination can be made at the time of inspection as to the effectiveness or function of any such gravity drains. At the time of inspection no gravity drains were seen.

Crawl Space Ventilation / Insulation / Vapor Barrier

Crawl Space Ventilation Methods of venting (Rim Joist Vents)

Rim Joist Insulation Insulated, Fiberglass

Ceiling Cavity Fiberglass

Crawl Space Vapor Barrier Vapor Barrier/Ground Cover (Present), Conditions (Black Plastic)

If the floor of a crawl space or basement is soil and/or gravel, it should be covered with a vapor retarding barrier of 6 mil black polyethylene sheeting.  Adjoining sections of the barrier material should overlap at least 6 inches, and pier blocks should not be covered.

Limitations/Exclusions Related to Crawl Space Foundation

Limitations/Exclusions Floors above crawl space Insulated / Not Visible, Very little of Foundation Walls visible at exterior

Insulation under the floor obstructs the view of much of the wood structures of the floor system.  Although this condition is typical of insulated homes, this is a standard limitation to the inspection and covered areas must be excluded from inspection. If it is possible to do so, the inspector has pulled back insulation in the corners, and areas of plumbing penetrations to view the structure.

Roof/Attic

Roof General Information

Roof Configuration Gable, Shed dormer

Gable Area Slopes 7/12±, most areas, 6/12±, porch roof

Shed Roof Area Slopes 4/12±

Method of Roof Inspection Walked on, Inspection method (Some areas not walked on)

Layers of Roofing Likely original roof covering, 1 layer

Extra Roof Materials were noted in none seen

Non-dimensional Composition (1-tab)

Composition Shingles 15-20 year life span, shed roof area only

"Guestimate" of age How is the age determined?, 1 year

Many criteria are used to "guestimate" the age of the roof. Listing information, age of home, assessor information, google map drive-by pictures, disclosure statements, deterioration or lack thereof of pipe flashings, exposure, roof type and color, and experience are all used to make this judgment--it is NOT absolute and should not be taken as such.

Method of Shingle Attachment/Sealing 3/8" head nails present--means of shingle attachment

(RA-2) Repair:

The shingles installed on the shed dormer that covers the stairwell area are a different type of shingle from the rest of the home. I cannot determine if they have the same life expectancy. I recommend discussing with the builder/seller why they are different and whether they have the same life expectancy or not. Typically they do not have the same life expectancy, but that can vary with manufacturer. I also was not able to determine if two layers of underlayment were installed for this slope as required. Discuss this with the builder/seller as well.

Dimensional Composition Shingles

Dimensional Composition Shingles Dimensional "Architectural" Grade Composition Shingle, 25-35 year life span

"Guestimate" of age 1 year old

Dimensional Composition Conditions no defects noted

Method of Shingle Attachment/Sealing 3/8" head nails present--means of shingle attachment

Flashings Related to Roof

Eave Flashings Present where checked--not all areas checked

Rake Flashings Present

Roof to Wall Flashings Metal Flashings present

Step Flashings Present

Kickout Flashings Present

Barge Rafter Flashings Flashed with shingles

Corbel Flashings Present

Fall Protection Devices Fall protection brackets noted (Weather-proof cap(s) present)

Main Attic

Attic Location, Access and Limitations Access location, SE corner of upper 3rd story room

Access Door/cover Insulation & Weather-stripping Insulation missing, weather-stripping is present

Roof Construction Most structural elements not visible, Engineered trusses, 24" oc

Engineered roof trusses are now commonly used for roof structures. Since the lower chord of a truss is usually not designed for vertical loading, attics should not be used for storage unless the trusses are specifically designed for such use.

  • Truss framing members should not be cut or field altered without design analysis. Once altered, a change in the loading pattern often dictates that the manufacturer, or structural engineer, must determine what remedial action is needed.

Vaulted Ceilings above knee-walls Rafters not visible

Determination of how or if vaulted ceilings are vented can be beyond the scope of the Standard Home Inspection. Determination of venting can be indicated by the presence of roof, ridge and soffit vents, but no determination can be made as to the effectiveness of such systems. Hidden damage in vaulted ceilings due to leaks and condensation from poor venting that regular monitoring of spaces below these roof systems is warranted. All signs of staining should be checked for active moisture by moisture meter.

Roof Sheathing OSB

Soffit Vents Non vented soffits in some areas

Roof vents Roof vents are present, Both high and low vents present

Attic/Roof Insulation General Information

All other things being equal, approximately half of the heat loss from a home is through the ceiling. It is typically easier and more effective to insulate the flat ceiling above living space rather than between the roof rafters. Adding insulation above the ceilings in poorly insulated older homes is generally a wise investment.

  • An energy assessment or audit is outside the scope of the standard home inspection. Any comments on amounts and/or materials are for general informational purposes only and were not verified.
  • Estimates of depth of insulation is not meant to imply that the attic is sufficiently insulated or that the estimated depth is consistent throughout the attic. Use these depth "guesstimates" as a guide in determining the necessity for upgrading/adding additional insulation or in determining if the amount is "close" to recommended current standards. Adequacy of insulation can best be determined by a professional Energy Audit.

Fiberglass Batts Quantities not determined, In Transitions Walls

Fiberglass "White" Loose-Fill Present

R-Value 2.8 per inch
Depth, inches of insulation installed 18"
Total R-Value 50.4

Fire-Blocking/Draft-Stopping General Information on Fire-blocking

Finish surfaces and/or insulation can conceal missing fire-blocking. When the basement space is fully finished off and/or insulated, evaluation of fire-blocking deficiencies is not usually possible.

  • Requirements for fire-blocking and draft-stopping in homes has changed over the years and varied from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. In general more modern requirements call for "blocking" the spread of fire from lower level spaces to upper level spaces. Some structures also have requirements for installation of protection against the flow of fire horizontally. To achieve this there are specific requirements as to sealing/blocking of spaces around pipes, ducts, chimneys, wiring, framing, laundry chutes, chases etc.
  • It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if all fire-blocking and/or draft-stopping is in place, but where it is "obviously" missing I attempt to identify the condition/location and recommend appropriate repairs for improved fire safety.

Roof Structures with no access Overlaying roof structures/dormers, All sloped ceiling areas, Front entryway porch, Gas fireplace extension, Overlaying roof structures/dormers, Across garage, Patio roof structure

It is very common to have areas of roof attached to homes that have no access to possible spaces within them. Usually no access is required to these spaces unless they are of sufficient size. I make to determination as to whether these spaces need access, or require access and observations and recommendations are based on observable exterior conditions at the time of inspection.*

Chimneys 1

Chimney See Furnace and Gas Appliance Venting

Roof Drainage

General Information about Roof Drainage General Information, Visible gutters are clean , not all gutters visible

Even-if/Unless it was raining at the time of inspection, it is not always possible to determine if gutters leak/overflow. Monitoring the gutters for leaks when it is raining is recommended. Leaking/overflowing gutters should be repaired to prevent damage to roof/fascia structures.
Properly functioning gutters, downspouts, and splash blocks or drain piping are critical to protect the foundation from moisture intrusion. Gutters should be cleaned as needed and leaky joints sealed.

Aluminum Gutters Continuous (seamless)

Downspout/Roof Drain Termination Upper roof gutters/downspouts terminate at lower roof surfaces

(RA-10) Improve:

When upper roof downspouts terminate at lower roof surfaces the additional water running across the lower roof can pre-maturely age the roof.  I recommend that the downspouts be extended across the roof surface or that the downspouts be relocated as necessary by a licensed gutter installation company to prevent the pre-mature ageing of the roof surface (There are also roof trays that can be installed to channel the water to the lower gutter.  These have the advantage of not clogging).

Skylights

Skylights Present at, Patio roof at four locations, Covers attached

Leaks are very common around skylights.  Poor flashing details, failed thermal seals, broken glass, missing safety glass, leaks to the inside of the home and leaks into the roof structure are common.  Hidden damage in roof and wall structures is a real possibility with failed skylight installations.  All evidence of leaking around skylights should be carefully evaluated.

Insulating Glass present

Safety Glass Safety Glass "etching" present

Roof/Skylight Flashings Appear adequate--no evidence of leaking seen

Opening/Non-opening Non-Opening type

Limitations / Exclusions Related to Roof

Roof Inspection Limitations / Exclusions Includes attic spaces, Some areas not walked on, Steepness, No access to some attic spaces, No access to some knee-wall spaces, Roof structures with no access (Knee-wall Attics, Overlaying roof structures/dormers, Dormers, All vaulted ceiling areas, Front entryway porch, Gas fireplace extension), Miscellaneous Information

This report provides an opinion of the general condition of the roof system based on a visual inspection of representative areas. The inspector does not offer an opinion or warranty as to whether the roof leaks or is subject to future leakage.

If it is dry, has been dry for a long time, or is not the rainy season the possibility of leaks not showing up at the time of inspection is not unusual. Water stains on ceilings, walls, and soffits that tested dry at the time of inspection may very well test elevated for moisture under other conditions or at another time.

Specific notation of leakage or stains does not preclude additional areas of leakage and/or hidden damage. Monitor attic for any changes; ongoing or questionable situations should be assessed and corrected. Leakage can lead to Mold or Mold-like/Fungal Growth.

Due to typical design/accessibility constraints (insulation, storage, etc.), evaluation of attic areas, including structural components, is usually limited. Any specifically noted limitations/obstructions are intended to highlight these limitations beyond the norm. A complete check of the attic should be made when non-permanent limitations are resolved.

Electrical

Electrical Service to Property

Electrical Service GENERAL ELECTRICAL SAFETY WARNING

GENERAL ELECTRICAL SAFETY WARNING: Even if the electricity has been turned off at the main disconnect, sections of the electrical system prior to the main breaker are still charged with electricity and can be lethal if contacted. I recommend that all changes/corrections made to the electrical system be performed by a licensed electrical contractor.

Underground Service GENERAL INFORMATION

The electrical service is the set of wires that run from the street or power pole to the main breaker panel or fuse box. In this home the service runs underground. Evaluation of the underground portion of these systems is limited to the portions that show above ground.

Utility Company In-ground junction box Not located

Meter Base Location South side of garage exterior

Meter Seals/Condition Meter Seals (Utility Company seals present)

Torqueing of electrical connection Lugs

Most electrical connection lugs have very specific requirements as to torqueing. Loose connections are a primary mode of failure of electrical connections potentially leading to arcing and fires. It is beyond the scope of the inspection to verify proper torqueing of connections and it is recommended that proper torqueing of connections be verified by the licensed electrical contractor in the context of other electrical repairs/improvements at the home.

Service Equipment

Service Equipment Location South side of garage interior

Service Rating Home (200 amps (120/240 volts))

Service Voltages Note about testing voltages, Nominal 240 volts

Washington State Home Inspector Standards of Practice require us to report the Amperage and Voltages of the electrical system. Amperage is determined by a variety of factors, including the panel label, wire size and service disconnect size and the amount is recorded in the "Notes and Maintenance" section of the report. Voltages are more difficult to report, as there can be normal fluctuations of voltages of plus or minus a few volts. Any issues with voltages and amperage will be discussed below when applicable.

Electrical service voltages supplied to buildings can fluctuate a few volts between legs but anything more than 10 volts should probably be further evaluated by a licensed electrical contractor. 120/240 volts is the "nominal" voltage supplied to this building and tested voltages were near these amounts.

Left lug to Neutral 121 volts

Right lug to Neutral 121 volts

Right lug to Left lug 241 volts

Panel Manufacturer Square-D (Homeline)

Panel amperage rating 200 amps (120/240 volts)

Service Disconnect Present

Breakers 200 amps (120/240 volts)

Service Conductors Aluminum

Size 4/0 awg

Service Feeder Lug Covers Present

PANEL CONDITION Conduit from meter base not sealed

Legend Data Plate present

Panel Bonding "Green Screw" bonding

Distribution Breakers/Fuses Breakers, Vehicle Charging System Breaker Space (provision for)

Circuit identification Circuits labeled (No determination was made of individual circuit distribution or accuracy of any circuit labeling)

Working Space at Panel Access OK, Lighting present

For proper access to the panel there should be an area 30" wide and 3' deep in front of the panel (clear all the way to the floor. A minimum of 6'-6" of headroom in front of the panel is recommended and the top of the panel should be at least 5-1/2' above the floor.

(E-7) Repair:

Where the service entrance wires run into the panel in conduit, from underground, the conduit has not been properly sealed.  This can allow for moisture, vermin and considerable air/soil gas infiltration.  I recommend evaluation/repairs and/or replacement as deemed necessary by a licensed electrical contractor in the context of other electrical repairs at the home.

NEC 300.50(F) Raceway Seal. Where a raceway enters from an underground system, the end within the building shall be sealed with an identified compound so as to prevent the entrance of moisture or gases.

Grounding

Utility Grounding Utility company transformer ground at transformer (Not located/inspected)

Concrete Encased Grounding Electrode (Ufer) Connection at (To foundation rebar, Behind cover plate near electrical panel)

This type of grounding is accomplished by connection to wires/rebar buried in the house footings/foundation..

Amperage on grounding system No amperage on ground wire at time of inspection

Bonding

Water Pipe Bonding NA/Plastic

Gas pipe bonding bonding likely accomplished via connection to gas appliances

Low Voltage System Bonding Inter-system bonding terminal present

Phone System Bonding Bonding noted at (Phone system not installed)

Cable System cable system not installed

Lock-out/Lock-on Devices

May not have been required at time of construction What is a lock-out/lock-on device?

Current standards require "lock-out" devices on appliances that are "hard-wired" back to the electrical panel disconnect (unless the appliance is in the line of sight of the electrical panel). This is for the safety of persons servicing the appliances.

Devices Present/Not Present for range hood

Surge Arresters

Arrester not present Not present but considered best practice and installation is encouraged

Voltage surges can be a costly example of the power interference that occurs in Buildings every day.  This momentary rise in voltage can start inside or outside a Building and damage sensitive electronic equipment such as computer, Building entertainment center, treadmills, and all the other --often expensive -- equipment found in most Buildings today.

  • Conventional surge protectors in the home cannot protect against large surges from lightning and it is still considered best practice to unplug expensive appliances during a lightning storm.
  • Whole Building surge arresters should be installed at the Building's electrical service panel by professional, licensed electrical contractors. There are dozens of different makes, models and styles of surge arresters on the market, which vary greatly in both price and quality. The type and size of the service panel, how full the panel is, as well as the investment in appliances and electronic devices that need to be protected all play a role in determining which surge arrester should be installed.  Your service professional, after inspecting the Building and service panel, will make the recommendation as to the appropriate product to be installed.

Distribution Wiring

Voltage readings above 120 volts More than 120 volts noted

It is very common in some areas for the voltage to be higher than 120 volts on the house circuits. (1-4 volts higher) When this occurs light bulbs rated at 120 volts do not last as long. I recommend installing bulbs rated for 130 volts. While these bulbs aren't as readily available they will last longer (they can be found at electrical supply stores).

  • This condition is not considered problematic with LED type bulbs as they supposedly handle wider voltage ranges.

Wiring type(s) Copper wire (It is estimated the majority of the wring in the home is Solid Conductor, Non-Metallic Sheathed Cable), Aluminum "stranded" (Service Entrance Conductors)

Wiring in Conduit (Rigid and Flex) Minimal/Incidental to specific appliances (Furnace)

Junction Boxes etc No defects noted

Receptacle Outlets

Grounded Receptacles The majority of receptacles that were tested, tested as being grounded

Receptacles at island countertop Receptacle present

Tamper Resistant Receptacles (required after June 6, 2009) Present at all observed receptacles

By current regulations in place in Washington State, any receptacle that is replaced in a home is required to be replaced with a Tamper Resistant Type Receptacle.  There are a few exceptions detailed in the links below.

Weather Resistant Receptacles (required at all damp and wet locations) Present at all observed damp/wet location receptacles

Lighting Outlets

General Lighting info LED bulbs noted at most locations to meet energy standards

Exterior lights Lights at exterior doors (Present at all exterior door locations), All functioned normally at time of inspection by switch

Light fixtures switched from multiple locations are present in the home General Information

Lights that are switched from multiple locations (like 3-way and 4-way switches) can sometimes be wired improperly so that if one of the switches is in the wrong position the lights will not work from the other location.  This miswiring of switches is often not found during the course of a Standard Home Inspection due to not testing the circuit with all possible combination of options.  When this condition is discovered, repairs are usually quite simple when performed by a licensed electrician.

Can Lights Present at many locations

Can lights, whether modern air-tight type cans or older non-insulation contact cans, can be a major contributor to heat loss and air movement into roof structures.  This is difficult to determine during the course of a home inspection but if moisture issues are apparent or become apparent in the roof structure, these lights should be considered one possible cause of the issue.  Blower door tests can be performed to determine how well sealed can lights are.

GFCI/AFCI devices

Locations of GFCI & AFCI devices/Service Panel What are AFCI devices?, What are GFCI devices?, # of GFCI breakers in Service Panel, none, # of Combination rated AFCI breakers in Service Panel, 11, # of Dual Function GFCI/AFCI Combination Breakers in Service Panel, 4

An arc-fault circuit interrupter is a device intended to provide protection from the effects of arc faults by recognizing characteristics unique to arcing and by functioning to de-energize the circuit when an arc fault is detected. They should be tested monthly by the homeowner.

  • To test the AFCI, turn OFF all loads downstream of the circuit breaker. Make sure power to the electrical panel is ON and AFCI circuit breaker handles is in the ON position. Push the blue (sometimes yellow) test button on the AFCI circuit breaker. If the circuit breaker is operating correctly, it will trip, and the handle will move to the tripped (center) position. Remember to reset the AFCI circuit breaker by moving the handle to the OFF position and then back to the ON position. If these procedures fail contact a licensed electrical contractor.
  • After July 1st, 2014, AFCI type breakers became required on most 120 volt 15 & 20 amp circuits (family rooms, kitchens, laundries, dining rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms, sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, or similar rooms or areas).

GFCI devices (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupt) have evolved over the years both in function and as to where they are required.  They are currently required at: receptacles/outlets at kitchen countertops, within 6' of all sinks, dishwashers, laundry rooms, bathroom receptacles, exterior receptacles, garage and unfinished basements, crawl spaces, hot tubs, whirlpool baths, swimming pools, water features, sump & ejector pumps and other locations. It is recommended that older style GFCI receptacles and breakers be tested monthly. 

  • New breakers and receptacles are "self-testing" and are preferred as they eliminate having to remember to test them or keeping receptacles accessible for testing.  Upgrading to self-testing GFCI breakers and receptacles is recommended.

Testing GFCI's and AFCI's See AFCI testing procedures below, See GFCI testing procedures below

An arc-fault circuit interrupter is a device intended to provide protection from the effects of arc faults by recognizing characteristics unique to arcing and by functioning to de-energize the circuit when an arc fault is detected.  They should be tested monthly by the homeowner. 

  1. Plug a nightlight (with an "ON/OFF" switch) or other product (such as a lamp or 3-bulb circuit tester) into the AFCI receptacle and turn the product "ON."
  2. Push the "Test" button located on the AFCI receptacle. The nightlight (or other product) or circuit should go "OFF."
  3. Push the "Reset" button. The light or circuit should go "ON" again.
  4. Circuit breaker type AFCI devices are checked by pushing the test button on the breaker.

Modern AFCI receptacles and breakers have "self-testing" capabilities but they still should be tested manually per manufacturer's instructions.

Ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCI) can help prevent electrocution inside and outside the home. GFCIs are an effective means of protecting against electrical shock, however, they must be tested regularly -- UL recommends once a month -- to verify they are working properly.

  1. Plug a nightlight (with an "ON/OFF" switch) or other product (such as a lamp or 3-bulb circuit tester) into the GFCI receptacle and turn the product "ON."
  2. Push the "Test" button located on the GFCI receptacle. The nightlight (or other product) or circuit should go "OFF."
  3. Push the "Reset" button. The light or circuit should go "ON" again.
  4. Circuit breaker type GFCI devices are checked by pushing the test button on the breaker.

Modern GFCI receptacles and breakers have "self-testing" capabilities but they still should be tested manually per manufacturer's instructions.

GFCI/AFCI/Kitchen/Laundry and Other Sinks

Locations of GFCI & AFCI devices Where currently required (All located Kitchen Receptacles tested as GFCI/AFCI protected)

Two Kitchen Circuits Appears to be two separate appliance circuits

It cannot always be easily determined if there are two appliance circuits present and the presence of two GFCI devices is not always an indication of two separate circuits.

Island Islands wider than 24" (Receptacle present)

Dishwasher GFCI/AFCI GFCI / AFCI breaker in service panel

Laundry Area GFCI/AFCI All located Laundry Area Receptacles tested as GFCI & AFCI protected where currently required

GFCI Garage

Garage GFCI Garage Receptacles that were tested, tested as GFCI protected

Automatic Door Opener Not verified

Water Heater On Demand Water Heater (Wired to GFCI protected circuit)

GFCI Exterior and Miscellaneous

Exterior Receptacles tested as gfci protected

GFCI's Master Bathroom

BATHROOM GFCI's All located Bathroom Receptacles tested as GFCI protected where currently required

Sink Receptacles Left sink, GFCI protected (At other bathroom GFCI in), Upper Hallway Bathroom at left sink

Sink Receptacles Right sink, GFCI protected (At other bathroom GFCI in), Upper hallway bathroom at left sink

GFCI's Upper Hallway Bathroom

BATHROOM GFCI's All located Bathroom Receptacles tested as GFCI protected where currently required

Sink Receptacles Left sink, GFCI protected (At receptacle)

Sink Receptacles Right sink, GFCI protected (At receptacle for left sink)

GFCI's Main Floor 3/4 Bath

BATHROOM GFCI's All located Bathroom Receptacles tested as GFCI protected where currently required

Sink Receptacles GFCI protected (At other bathroom GFCI in), Upper Hallway bathroom at left sink

AFCI-Arc Fault Circuit Interrupt

Where are they required? New construction

Currently all 120-volt, single phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets installed in dwelling unit family rooms, dining rooms, kitchens, laundries, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms, sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, or similar rooms or areas are required to be AFCI protected per current standards.  The home appeared to be wired to current requirements, however not every outlet was checked.

AFCI Devices/Protection for Lighting Outlets

Family Room Lighting Outlets Lights that were checked tested as AFCI protected

Living Room Lighting Outlets Lights that were checked tested as AFCI protected

Closet lighting Lights that were checked tested as AFCI protected

Den Lighting Outlets Lights that were checked tested as AFCI protected

Bedroom Lighting Outlets Lights that were checked tested as AFCI protected

Hallway Lighting Outlets Lights that were checked tested as AFCI protected

Rec-room Lighting Outlets Lights that were checked tested as AFCI protected

AFCI Devices/Protection for Receptacles and other Outlets

Family Room Receptacles & Other Outlets Receptacles that were checked tested as AFCI protected

Dining Room Receptacles & Other Outlets Receptacles that were checked tested as AFCI protected

Living Room Receptacles & Other Outlets Receptacles related to replacement of devices to tamper resistant type receptacles

Gas fireplace outlet Tested as AFCI protected

Den Receptacles & Other Outlets Receptacles that were checked tested as AFCI protected

Bedroom Receptacles & Other Outlets Receptacles that were checked tested as AFCI protected

Hallway Receptacles & Other Outlets Receptacles that were checked tested as AFCI protected

Rec-room Receptacles & Other Outlets Receptacles that were checked tested as AFCI protected

Smoke Alarm Outlets Smoke detectors tested as being on AFCI protected circuit

Carbon Monoxide Detection Systems

See Notes below about carbon monoxide detectors

At the time of inspection Carbon Monoxide alarm/detectors are not tested.  I recommend that prior to move-in, that all Carbon Monoxide alarm/detectors be tested and have their batteries replaced.  It is recommended that Carbon Monoxide detectors that are older than 5 years should be replaced by a licensed electrical contractor if they are hard-wired; and replaced by the homeowner/handy-person if they are battery operated.  These devices are currently required, according to Washington State Law to be maintained by the tenant/homeowner according to the manufacturer's recommendations/instructions and are required in all homes.

  • For optimum safety, Carbon Monoxide alarm/detectors are required in the immediate vicinity of bedrooms and on each floor level of the home and inside of any sleeping room if there is a gas appliance in the room.  "Immediate vicinity" is not defined but most manufacturers recommend they be installed between 5 and 20 feet of sleeping rooms.  Alarm/detectors must be maintained free of dust and debris which can interfere with operation.  They should be installed per manufacturer's instructions .  While it is primarily fuel burning appliances the produce carbon monoxide, CO is also produced from electric appliances like toasters and ranges (especially ovens on self clean cycle).
  • Please be aware that residential Carbon Monoxide detectors are cumulative and are designed to not sound with low levels of carbon monoxide.  Some people are more susceptible than others to low levels of carbon monoxide and I consider it prudent to familiarize yourself with the symptoms/warning signs of Carbon Monoxide.  Detectors that meet the UL-2034 requirements for detectors installed in residential construction are not allowed to sound at continuous CO levels up to 30 ppm, 70 ppm for 4 hours, 150 ppm for up to 50 minutes and 400 ppm for up to 15 minutes. CARBON MONOXIDE
  • Combination type alarms can be problematic even while meeting "legal requirements" for installation.  Carbon Monoxide detectors in conjunction with Ionization type smoke detectors is problematic due to the poor ion technology (see links under smoke alarms previous to this section).  The devices also can have different life spans.  For best protection, combination type alarms should not be used, even though this is a standard recommendation of manufacturers.  The International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF) specifically recommends against installing combination alarms.  Combination type alarms are required to be UL-217 and UL-2034 listed. 

Presence noted at different floor levels (hard-wired) Main Floor Level (Not verified)

Presence noted in vicinity of sleeping areas (hard-wired) Second Floor level (Present)

General comments Now required prior to occupancy in all homes involved in a sale or transfer of property.

Smoke Alarm / Detection Systems

See notes Below about smoke alarms, Interconnected alarms

At the time of inspection smoke alarms are not tested.  I recommend that prior to move-in, that all smoke alarms be tested according to manufacturer's recommendations and that their batteries be replaced.  It is recommended that smoke alarms that are older than 5-7 years should be replaced by a licensed electrical contractor if they are hard-wired; and replaced by the homeowner/handy-person if they are battery operated.

  • For optimum safety, hard-wired smoke alarms with backup batteries are recommended in each bedroom, and hallways outside of bedrooms.  At least one smoke alarm should be installed on each floor of the home. Alarms must be maintained free of dust and debris which can interfere with operation.
  • Smoke alarm technology is evolving and current wisdom is going in the direction of recommending that only Photoelectric smoke alarms be installed in the home due to the nuisance tripping and other human factors involved with misuse and maintenance associated with Ionization type smoke alarms.  It is not possible in the context of the home inspection to determine why types of alarms are installed in the home.  You are encouraged to install and maintain any type of alarm in the home and you are encouraged to upgrade alarms to photoelectric type alarms. See the following link for a discussion of Ionization vs. Photoelectric Alarms: Photo-Electric Smoke Alarms and Silent Alarms; Deadly Differences.

SMOKE ALARM Maintenance

  • Clean regularly. Dust and debris will interfere with normal operation.
  • Replace batteries at least once a year---or better yet install 10yr type batteries.
  • Schedule regular maintenance and tests. The Consumer Products Safety Commission recommends checking these alarms every Spring & Fall time change. Tests should be performed according to manufacturer's instructions.
  • It is not usually possible in the context of a home inspection to determine whether smoke alarms are Ionization type or photoelectric type

Houses this age require the alarms to be interconnected.  When one "sounds"  they all should sound.  The electrical codes now allow for the installation of wireless, interconnected type smoke alarms.  It typically is not possible to determine why types of alarms are installed in the home.

Inside Bedroom(s) includes rooms that could be used as sleeping areas Hardwired/Battery back-up type (Present)

Proximity of Bedroom(s) includes rooms that could be used as sleeping areas Present within 21 feet of all bedrooms

Main Floor Level Hardwired/Battery back-up type (Present)

Second Floor Level Hardwired/Battery back-up type (Present)

Third Floor Level Hardwired/Battery back-up type (Present)

Door Bell

Front Door Bell Function (Chime heard)

Transformer location Crawl space near access opening

Inspection Limitations / Exclusions related to electrical

Limitations/Exclusions Miscellaneous information, Limited access to attic space (s), Insulation in Attic, Insulation in Crawl Space, Furnishings / Storage/Staging prevented access to some receptacle outlets

  • Low voltage wiring systems, including timers and sensors, are not part of this inspection.
  • Security and alarm systems are not within the scope of this inspection.
  • Evaluation of auxiliary, low voltage, electric or electronic equipment (e.g., TV, doorbell, computer, cable, lightning protection, surge protection, low voltage lighting, intercoms, site lighting, etc.,) is not performed as part of a standard home inspection.
  • Unless otherwise noted no determination is made as to whether any electrical component has the proper UL Listing. Permanently installed light fixtures made in other countries sometimes do not have the proper UL Listing indicated on them.

Plumbing

Public Utility Water Supply

House Water Supply Meter Location At street, Meter not identified, Meter appeared to NOT be moving with house vacant

Main Water Shut-off At Meter at street (Even when there is a shut off located within the home the water to the home can always be shut off at the street), No other shut-off found

Water Pressure Water Pressure, PSI tested at, outside faucet, 75 psi, Normal

Please note that the water pressure to the home can vary considerably depending on supply controls of the municipality/utility. If at the time of inspection the water pressure is close to the low end of the scale (40psi) or toward the high end of the scale (70psi), fluctuations above and below these parameters can adversely affect flow and pipe connections.

Functional Flow Noted information below will not be repeated for individual fixtures, Adequate flow at time of inspection on both hot and cold sides

Functional flow at individual fixture locations will not be further discussed at individual fixture locations. However there is some possibility that cleaning fixture valves, screens and interior components could improve flow--at least temporarily.

Main Water Line and Protection Main Water Line (Most of piping not visible), Plastic (PEX (plastic))

Enters Home/Building at Crawl Space (NW corner of crawl space)

Diameter of pipe 1-1/4"

Pressure regulator location Crawl Space (NW corner of crawl space)

Pressure Regulator Conditions Expansion Tank (Tank--or Thermal Expansion Device--NOT seen)

Expansion Tank Expansion Tank is not present but is required by current standards when any time of back-flow prevention is installed on the system

Lawn Irrigation System Deferred to homeowner association

(P-1) Repair:

Several water meters were noted at west side of the property but determining which one goes with this property could not be determined at the time of inspection.  I recommend asking builder/seller where the meter is located.  Numbers on the meters compared with numbers on water bills can be used to determine which meter goes with this home.

(P-2) Repair:

No water shut-off was found within the home.  This is not uncommon.  Water to the home can always be shut off at the street/meter.  As an upgrade,  I recommend having a licensed plumber install a shut-off inside the home for convenience unless it is determined that there is already one somewhere.  I recommend asking seller if they know of an inside shut-off.

(P-3) Repair:

Water heaters installed after the year 2006 in most jurisdictions (and certainly this one) require installation of an expansion tank (or expansion device) on the plumbing system whenever there is any type of back-flow valve, pressure reducing valve ahead of the water heating equipment. Sometimes the water meter creates a closed system. Discuss with the builder/seller as to whether the home is on a closed system or not. If it is determined that the home is a "closed system" installation of an expansion tank/device would be required by the water heater manufacturer. See water heater section below.

The pressure regulator is a type that apparently allows for water expansion control. No further recommendation at this time.

Water Supply Piping Inside the Building

Water Supply Piping in the Building Most of piping not visible

PEX Pipe Amounts of PEX (Majority, Manufacturer and type of fittings not determined)

In properly installed PEX plumbing systems the piping will be either insulated or otherwise covered. Typically determining the types of fittings and even the manufacturer of the piping itself cannot be readily determined.

For the purpose of this report it is assumed that the piping is plastic. If it is discovered that the supply plumbing is metal piping there are missing required electrical bonding elements.

Hot Water Pipe Insulation Hot water pipes (Insulated)

Cold Water Pipe Insulation Cold water pipes (Insulated)

Fire Suppression System Present

No assessment of the proper function of backflow valves can be made during a standard home inspection. These valves must be inspected and tested once a year in most jurisdictions. I recommend that this valve be tested by a qualified back flow valve testing company as required.

  • Back Flow valves are required when fire-suppression systems are installed. These valves require yearly testing and maintenance and are typically located inside the home.

Outside Faucets

Outside Faucets General Information related to outside faucets

The outside faucets listed below may not include all the faucets present on the property. Evaluation of other faucets located should be further evaluated in the context of other plumbing work done at the home.

  • Outside faucets are typically tested as to basic function (turn off and on) and tested under back pressure with a pressure gauge.
  • Above Information not repeated in relation to other outside faucets.

Frost Free/Anti-Siphon Outside Faucets SW corner of garage exterior, Valve not tested for function, Anti-siphon device (Integral type present), Valve attachment (Screws present), Interior shut-off present to allow for draining of faucet, in garage next to water heater

Frost Free/Anti-Siphon Outside Faucets East side of home, Turned on, under back-pressure, without leaking, Anti-siphon device (Integral type present), Valve attachment (Screws present)

Waste Pipe and Discharge

Public Sewer Public Sewer

It is it is not likely, sufficient water will be used during the course of the inspection that would duplicate actual use of the drainage systems of the home under all scenarios. Plugged drains are quite common in homes and the interior condition of drains can not typically be determined or predicted.

Interior Clean-out Location Several locations in crawl space

Clean-out at Exterior Outside location, south side of home

Drain / Waste / Vent Piping (DWV) Most of drainage piping not visible

ABS Drain Pipes Sometimes plastic drain pipes that run through walls from upper levels can be very noisy, all visible pipe is ABS

Vent Piping Plumbing Venting (Vents extended through roof)

Vent Pipe Flashings No defects noted, Rubber/Gasket type flashings

These rubber gasket type pipe flashings are prone to leaking. It is not always possible to tell from a visual inspection if these seals around the pipe are effective. I recommend that if leaking occurs or when the home is re-roofed that these flashings be replaced with lead type flashings that protect the roof and fold inside the pipe at the top.

Gas Piping at Property

Gas Piping Pipe size entering the Home (1-1/2")

Black Steel & Galvanized Pipe Black Steel

CSST Pipe CSST--Coated Stainless Steel, Manufacturer not determined, Black CSST run to gas fireplace

Gas Meter Gas Meter Located at, South side of garage, Tracer wire present, Meter location relative to street (Meter is located within the first 3rd of the side of the house from the street), Meter location relative to finish grade (Bottom of meter more than 6" from finish grade), Meter's Gas shut-off present

The gas meter is typically the property of the local utility. All concerns regarding the meter should be directed to the gas utility.

  • Where the gas pipe comes out of the ground to the meter there is often a Yellow (usually) Tracer wire. This wire is not supposed to be connected to anything and is only there to assist anyone trying to locate the underground plastic pipe out to the street.

425 Meter present

(P-13) Repair:

There is some TracPipe, Counterstrike type stainless steel flexible gas pipe in the home. There are maximum amounts that the covering can be cut back and at one location it appears to be cut back too far. I recommend evaluation/repairs by a licensed plumber. There is repair tape for these kinds of repairs. The end at the fireplace should also be checked and repaired if needed.

Water Temperature Control

Protection From Bacteria and Scalding Thermostatic mixing valve (It was not verified as to whether any of the shower/tub valves are thermostatically controlled as required)

Bathroom at Master Bathroom

Tub Under sink type, Water temperature tested as less than 120 degrees F consistent with mixing valve at water heater, May not be necessary with the tankless set at 120° F

Gas Tankless Water Heater

Gas Tankless Water Heater BTU Rating, 199,000

Manufacturer Rinnai

Model # RU199iN

Serial # LB.BA-021223

Manufacture date 2019

Years old <1

Forced Draft Type Direct Vent/Air-Intake (Unit "individually" vented (dedicated), Forced Draft type, PVC Plastic vent/air intake, 2" pipe, Non-cellular core type pipe---but not verified)

PRV (Pressure Relief Valve) Testing PRV's, PRV located at required location, Drains to plumbing drain at, near unit, air gap is present

A pressure relief valve (PRV) is required on all on-demand water heaters to discharge any excessive pressure within the system.  A discharge pipe should be attached to the Pressure Relief valve and directed to a safe location away from body contact.  Newer installations must be directed to the building exterior or to an approved indoor drain receptor.  Most manufacturers suggest that homeowners test the PRV at least once a year by lifting the lever to ensure the valve discharges properly.  The picture to the right shows a typical PR Valve.  I do not test these valves due to the possibility that they may leak after testing.  A leaking or inoperative PR Valve should be replaced immediately by a licensed plumber.

Water Temperature Degrees F, "read-out" on heater control panel, 120

Supply Connections Cold water shut-off (Present at heater), Hot water shut-off (Present at heater)

Condensate Drain Present and drains from condensate trap, Terminates at, drain with the PRV drain

Drain Valve Present

Expansion Tank Expansion Tank is not present but is required by current standards when any time of back-flow prevention is installed on the system

(P-14) Repair:

Water heaters installed after the year 2006 in most jurisdictions (and certainly this one) require installation of an expansion tank (or expansion device) on the plumbing system whenever there is any type of back-flow valve, pressure reducing valve ahead of the water heating equipment.  Missing thermal expansion devices can be an indication of work done by unqualified individuals, without proper permits or that it has been verified that there is no other means of back flow prevention including the water meter.  I recommend further evaluation/repairs by a licensed plumber.

(P-16) Repair:

At the time of inspection the vent/air intake cap for the water heater located on the south side of the home was backwards. A repair person made repairs at the time of inspection but proper repairs should be verified.

Yard Irrigation Systems

The System location Deferred to Homeowner Association

Fire Suppression System

The System location Present, Back-Flow valve present, next to furnace

Fire suppression systems are not included in a Standard Home Inspection. These systems can be inspected at an additional cost, but are otherwise excluded. Typically I do check to make sure back-blow valves are in place and will note implications of observed defects in relation to components that are covered by this inspection (such as broken sprinkler heads and obvious leaking).

  • It is recommended that suppression systems be tested according to the manufacturer's testing recommendations.
  • Make sure you obtain all necessary information regarding proper maintenance of the fire suppression system.

Inspection Limitations / Exclusions Related to Plumbing

Limitations and Exclusions Back-flow valves (Back-flow valves are not inspected), Supply pipes (Piping insulated--condition and type not visible in some areas), Some components deferred to Homeowner Association, Water supply to building (Main water valve in house not located)

Heating, Cooling

High Efficiency Gas Furnace

High Efficiency Gas Furnace Location General Information, Garage closet

The life expectancy of a high efficiency gas furnace is approximately 20 to 25 years. This figure can vary widely depending on many factors. All such furnaces from this time period should be considered past there useful life and should be replaced for safety and efficiency reasons.

  • The “heart” of a furnace is a metal chamber referred to as a heat exchanger. All or most areas of the heat exchanger are not readily accessible or visible to a home inspector. Therefore, assessment of a furnace is limited to external and operational conditions. The older the unit, the greater the probability of failure. A thorough inspection by a qualified HVAC contractor is advised for a full evaluation of heat exchanger conditions, particularly when the unit is beyond its expected useful life.

Manufacturer Trane / American Standard

Model # AUH1D120A9601CB

Serial # 19074L7L2G

Manufacture Date 2019

Years old <1

BTU's Up-flow Furnace 110,000, BTU input/output/efficiency

BTU input 110,000
BTU output 113,000
Calculated efficiency (Output divided by Input) is >90%

Sediment Traps & Drip Legs Sediment Traps (Present--(Appliance side of shut-off valve), NOT seen/verified), Drip Legs

A "drip leg" is located at the lowest point in the gas line system, and there may be more than one "lowest point" in that it is seldom that the gas piping is run horizontally or at a continuous slope, meaning the gas piping is usually run up and around things, then back down and around things, then back up, and each low point would require a drip leg IF the gas was considered to be wet gas. Generally the NW has what is considered to be "dry gas" and a drip leg may or may not be present.

Function Unit appeared to operate normally, using thermostat controls

Condition/Access Access to heating unit (Accessible), Visual Condition & Operation of heating unit (N/A, New Furnace)

Venting & Combustion/dilution air brought in from exterior of building PVC Plastic vent/air intake (3" pipe), Pipe connections (Glued)

Termination at south side of building

Filter Plenum under furnace, Clean

Electrical Shut-off Breaker in electrical panel

Current standards require "lock-out" devices on appliances that are "hard-wired" back to the electrical panel disconnect (unless the appliance is in the line of sight of the electrical panel). This is for the safety of persons servicing the appliances.

Appliance Gas Shut-off Present--within 6' of furnace

Thermostat at Dining area

Heating and Cooling Distribution

Distribution Temperature at registers (Furnace):, Heat noted at all registers during operation of unit

Temperatures at supply registers are taken with infrared camera but it must be noted the instrument measures grille surface temperature and not the air temperature. Different register materials and textures will show different temperatures than the actual air temperature (Thermometers would be more accurate but take considerable time to take). The infrared temperatures should therefor only be seen as a rough guestimate of temperatures. It is the "relative" difference in temperatures that is of interest to the inspector to determine some level of consistent function of the system at the time of inspection and to find registers that are not delivering heat consistent with other locations.

Temperatures at supply registers are taken with infrared camera but it must be noted the instrument measures grille surface temperature and not the air temperature. Different register materials and textures will show different temperatures than the actual air temperature (Thermometers would be more accurate but take considerable time to take). The infrared temperatures should therefor only be seen as a rough guestimate of temperatures. It is the "relative" difference in temperatures that is of interest to the inspector to determine some level of consistent function of the system at the time of inspection and to find registers that are not delivering heat consistent with other locations.

  • Basically the only thing a home inspector can verify is that warn air flowed from the supply registers.
  • Adequacy can be affected by many factors including seasonal extremes and personal methods of use of the system.

Heating/Cooling Overview Heating units

The inspection of a ducted heating system is primarily focused on whether heat is being delivered to the various locations throughout the home.  Register temperatures will be taken by infrared camera to find significant differences in temperatures delivered but it must be kept in mind these measurements are "relative" and not exact due to the way infrared sees surface temperature.  Temperatures will be skewed by the type of register surface, the distance from the surface as well as velocity of air at the register.  While measuring air temperature with a thermometer would be a more accurate way to test the temperature, this takes considerably more time and would not typically result in significant improvement of the information designed to verify heat is being delivered to the locations.  This also does not provide any indication as to how the system will function when it is really cold out, unless it happened to be very cold at the time of inspection.  It also cannot therefor determine whether the system is too small or too big.  All of these questions are best directed to a licensed HVAC contractor in the context of your due diligence.

Ductwork Ductwork Information, Ductwork concealed--mostly not visible, Air Returns, present

Ductwork Interiors: It is typically not possible to evaluate the interior of ductwork as to condition or the presence of detrimental materials or other conditions. Hidden conditions can include evidence of rodent and/or other vermin activity, dust/debris, water, vegetation, tobacco smoke etc.

Is Duct Cleaning Really Necessary?

Attic Ductwork Ductwork insulation in Attic (Ductwork is insulated)

Crawl Space Ductwork Ductwork insulation in crawl spaces (Ductwork is insulated)

Duct Cleaning Is duct cleaning necessary?

Heating ducts can accumulate dust over time. Under most conditions, where filters are properly maintained, cleaning of ductwork is discouraged. Properly cleaning ductwork is more complicated than merely hiring a duct cleaning contractor and having the ducts "cleaned." Standard cleaning protocols can result in introducing more dirt particles into the indoor environment than would occur had the ducts been left alone. There is significant evidence to support the idea that the dust inside ductwork actually acts as a filter itself to promote clean air in the home. Obviously if the ductwork becomes contaminated with toxic chemicals, or have been flooded etc will need to be cleaned and/or possibly be replaced. Ductwork must be adequately protected from dust during remodeling activities and if this is not done the ductwork will likely require cleaning and/or replacement. For more information on the pros and cons of duct cleaning please see: Is Duct Cleaning Really Necessary?

Air Change

Energy Efficiency Documentation and Current Requirements Current requirements, Required Test Results, Energy information sticker not filled out

Air Change System present

Integrated with Laundry or Bathroom Exhaust Fan Integrated with Laundry Exhaust Fan (Timer Location in laundry, Air intake location _____, No specific air intake locations noted--general infiltration likely used as source of air, Likely relies on "general infiltration at doors and windows, Functional)

(HC-10) Efficiency:

A permanent certificate shall be completed by the builder or registered design professional and posted on a wall in the space where the furnace is located, a utility room, or an approved location inside the building. When located on an electrical panel, the certificate shall not cover or obstruct the visibility of the circuit directory label, service disconnect label, or other required labels. The certificate shall list the predominant R-values of insulation installed in or on ceiling/roof, walls, foundation (slab, below-grade wall, and/or floor) and ducts outside conditioned spaces; U-factors for fenestration and the solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) of fenestration, and the results from any required duct system and building envelope air leakage testing done on the building. Where there is more than one value for each component, the certificate shall list the value covering the largest area. The certificate shall list the types and efficiencies of heating, cooling and service water heating equipment. Where a gas-fired unvented room heater, electric furnace, or baseboard electric heater is installed in the residence, the certificate shall list "gas-fired unvented room heater," "electric furnace" or "baseboard electric heater," as appropriate. An efficiency shall not be listed for gas-fired unvented room heaters, electric furnaces or electric baseboard heaters. (R401.3)

(HC-11) Efficiency:

Blower Door Test Results: The building or dwelling unit shall be tested and verified as having an air leakage rate of not exceeding 5 air changes per hour (WA State Amendment to the Energy Code). Testing shall be conducted with a blower door at a pressure of 0.2 inches w.g. (50 Pascals).

  • The 4.30 ACH-50, recorded on the Energy Information sheet is consistent with compliance for air leakage.

Duct Testing, Rough-in Test: Total leakage shall be less than or equal to 4 cfm per 100 square feet of conditioned floor area when tested at a pressure differential of 25 Pascals across the system, including the manufacturer's air handler enclosure.

  1. Test target 161.6 CFM@25Pascals meets the test results of 148 CFM@25Pascals.
(HC-12) Repair:

At the electrical panel there is a required (mandatory) energy information sticker that has yet to be fully filled out. I recommend bringing this to the attention of the builder/seller for proper completion. This Information Sticker records the results of the "required" blower door test, the results of the "required" duct testing as well as other energy features of the home. It is not likely that the house certificate of occupancy can be granted until this form is complete.

(HC-13) Repair:

I could not determine how air is brought into the home for the air exchange fan located in the laundry room. There is a timer for control of the fan and general infiltration may be relied on for air replacement when the fan is running.  I recommend consulting with the licensed heating contractor to determine source of air and make repairs if deemed necessary.  With no air intake the house can become depressurized resulting in pulling air/moisture into the building envelope where it might do concealed damage. See information below regarding a second air change system.

Air Change #2

Air Change System present

Integrated with Force Air System present but should be discussed with builder

Automatic Damper in duct to air return Function of automatic damper not determined, presence not verified, Automatic Function (controlled by thermostat?)", May be integrated with kitchen range hood on high speed?

(HC-14) Repair:

There is an inline fan under the kitchen area that draws air from the exterior and pushes it through the furnace and ductwork into the home. This may work in conjunction with the "air" setting on the furnace and/or may be tied into the high speed setting of the kitchen exhaust fan. I recommend discussing both of these systems with the builder/seller to gain an understanding of exactly how the systems work and how they are maintained and should be used. The screened intake at the south side of the home needs cleaning as it is beginning to be impacted with leaves and debris. Ongoing, this screen needs to be maintained free of debris.

Inspection Limitations / Exclusions Related to Heating/Cooling

Limitations and Exclusions Furnishings/belongings/curtains/blinds impacting heaters at many locations, Some heating register covers not visible at time of inspection, Determination of heating or cooling system adequacy is beyond the scope of this inspection., Thermostats are not checked for accuracy or timed functions.

Windows

Windows

Safety Glazing in the Home What about Safety Glass?

While determining the presence of "Safety Glazing" in the home is beyond the Standards of Practice, I endeavor to identify safety glazing when possible to improve safety. In this report Safety Glazing is generically used to refer to any of the types of safety glazing including "Laminated Safety Glass", "Tempered Safety Glass" etc. The requirements for safety glazing in homes has changed over the years and varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Questions of the appropriateness or lack of safety glazing in this home should be addressed to the local building department.

General Window Information Double Pane Info

Problems with double pane windows are common: sash issues, condensation issues, broken hinge mechanisms, broken/missing latches, corrosion, broken thermal seals, defective thermal coatings, failed paint, failed glazing etc.

Styles of windows Fixed (picture), Slider, Single-Hung

Interior Window Sills Painted wood

Glass less than 18" above the floor Tempered/Safety glass on glazing less than 18" above floors that meets ALL 4 of the conditions below, Safety Glass "etching" present

√ Exposed area of an individual pane larger than 9 square feet.
√ Bottom edge less than 18 inches above the floor.
√ Top edge more than 36 inches above the floor.
√ One or more walking surfaces within 36 inches horizontally of the glazing.

Vinyl Windows Double pane glass, Screens present, Window weather-stripping (present on checked windows, not all windows were checked)

Window Coverings/Blinds None Present

Window coverings and blinds are not inspected for function at the time of inspection except in the process of testing windows for function. I recommend that you test these blinds as desired.

Draw strings and slatted type coverings can be a strangulation hazard for small children. I recommend considering some of the newer types of blinds that are less dangerous to small children. For more information regarding the safety hazards of blinds, see the Consumer Product Safety Commission website at: Window Blind Safety Information

1.  Move all cribs, beds, furniture and toys away from windows and window cords, preferably to another wall.
2.  Keep all window cords out of the reach of children. Make sure that tasseled pull cords are short, and that continuous-loop cords are permanently anchored to the floor or wall.
3.  To prevent inner-cord hazards, lock cords into position when lowering horizontal coverings or shades.
4.  Repair window coverings, corded shades and draperies manufactured before 2001 with retrofit cord-repair devices, or replace them with today's safer products.

5.  Consider installing cordless window coverings in children's bedrooms and play areas.

Limitations/Exclusions Related to Doors and Windows

Limitations/Exclusions Restrictions (Furnishing/Storage limited inspection, Screens can limit inspection of windows from exterior), Staged

If the home was furnished (or "Staged") at the time of the inspection, not all interior finishes were visible. I advise a careful walk through once all furnishings are removed. No comments are offered on cosmetic finishes.

Doors

Front Entryway Door

Home Security How secure are your doors?

The "Security" of any home is never absolute. At the time of inspection I assess the "basic functionality" of door and window locking mechanisms. No assessment of the individual or overall effectiveness of security is implied. Glass, frames, locks and other elements can be prone to "tampering" and are "limiting factors" of locking mechanisms/systems. All security devices and systems must be balanced against the ease of escape in the event of emergency. Concerns about the home's overall security system should be addressed by a licensed home security company.

Front Entryway Door Door is primary egress door 36" by 6'-8" minimum

Door Construction matterials not confirmed

Conditions No defects noted

Weather-Stripping Present on top and sides, Type of weather-stripping (Foam Compression Type Weather Strip)

Hinges No defects noted

Lockset & Security Mechanisms Functioned under test, Dead Bolt (Dead-Bolt lock only)

Glass Next to Door Side lite, Safety Glazing (Safety glass "etching" present)

Door #2

East Patio Door

Entryway Door Slider

Door Construction Vinyl

Conditions No defects noted for age

Lockset & Security Mechanisms Security compromised (Slider does not lock)

Glass in Door Double Pane Glass, Safety Glazing (Safety glass "etching" present)

Screen/Storm Door Screen Door (Screen present, Not inspected)

(D2-1) Repair:

The Slider Door at the east patio does not lock properly.  I recommend bringing this to the attention of the builder/seller for adjustments by qualified repair person to allow for proper locking of the door.

Interior Doors

Interior Doors Required minimum 1/2"-5/8" clearance under interior doors for forced air heating system

Interior Doors

Front Entryway Door

Front Entryway Door Door is primary egress door 36" by 6'-8" minimum

Interior Doors

Interior Doors Required minimum 1/2"-5/8" clearance under interior doors for forced air heating system, Turn-Button lock mechanisms present on some doors

For proper function of the furnace there must be sufficient air flow for the air entering at the heat registers to be able to flow to the furnace air return. When carpeting, etc. interfere with this flow, I recommend that homeowner/handyperson cut off the bottom of the door to allow for a minimum of 3/4".

Styles of Doors Raised Panel

Door Stops Present

Glazing Glass present in Some Interior Doors: (Safety Glass "etching" present)

Pocket Doors Present at some locations

Bi-fold Doors Present at some locations

Interiors

Global Interior Information

Information related to Interiors of the building Things that make the inspection difficult

The items listed below were present at the time of inspection. These items can conceal damage to walls/floors. Concealed defects are not within the scope of the home inspection. Some of these conditions may only become apparent in the course of remodeling or other more invasive investigations. Carpeting, Area Rugs, Furnishings, Built-in Cabinets, Appliances, Storage Items, Curtains/Blinds, Bookcases, Paintings/Pictures, Staging Items, Mirrors, etc.

Habitability and Egress and Escape & Rescue related to non-sleeping areas Current safety guidelines

Listing information for homes often call rooms bedrooms according to appraiser records and various other determinations.  In this report, while I may refer to rooms as bedrooms, technically rooms that do not have a means of heat, secondary escape and rescue, or sufficient height (as well as numerous other habitability requirements) do not mean current requirements to be  considered "habitable."  These non-conforming "bedrooms" could almost always benefit from improvements for safety and habitability.  As such the Basement SE room and the Basement itself does not meet these criteria for proper secondary escape and rescue, or ceiling height.  Minimum height requirement is 7' and may indicate remodeling of the basement without permits or some variance that was permitted.

Indoor Air Quality IAQ Info

All houses are potentially subject to indoor air quality concerns due to numerous factors such as improper venting systems, out-gassing from construction materials, etc. Air quality can also be adversely affected by the growth of molds, fungi and other microorganisms – most are the result of adverse moisture conditions. A home inspection does not include assessment of potential health or environmental contaminants or allergens. If leakage occurs or detrimental moisture conditions exist or develop the possibility of potentially harmful contaminants exists and therefore should be immediately addressed. For air quality evaluations, a qualified testing firm should be contacted.

Combustion/Dilution Air This home has appliances that need air.

All combustion appliances require air for proper combustion. Homes with inadequate means of introducing air for these combustion appliances are at risk of the build-up of harmful combustion by-products and back-drafting of the exhaust from these systems. Other mechanical exhaust fans can also compete for intake air and complicate the problem. Assurances are warranted that there is adequate sources of makeup air for both combustion appliances and exhaust fans.

  • Homes with all direct vent gas appliances rarely have combustion-air related issues. Ranges should only be operated with the hood exhaust running.

General Floor Conditions Floors typical of age/use/type of construction

Generally, throughout the home (including bathrooms, kitchen, laundry etc) the floors have some mechanical damage and wear consistent with age and use. Concerns that warrant additional mention, if any, will be described in more detail in the flooring section of the individual rooms below.

General New Construction Floors/Walls/Ceilings New Construction

Generally, throughout the home (including bathrooms, kitchen, laundry etc) the walls, ceilings and floors have only cosmetic concerns, nail pops, and some painting/repair/touch up noted typical of most new drywall installations--bring to the attention of the builder for completion to your satisfaction. Concerns that warrant additional mention, if any, will be described in more detail in the walls & ceiling sections of the individual rooms below or in the narrative portion of the report.

Homes With Tile Floors/Walls/Countertops Etc Are there any loose/damaged tiles?, General information on Tile and Stone

When buying a home with tile floors/walls and/or tile countertops, it is important to keep in mind that it is not within the scope of a Standard Home Inspection to determine if loose tiles are present. This is obviously true in areas that are covered with belongings and/or carpets. Cracks in tiles and/or grout are often consistent with loose tiles and any such conditions noted should be seen as an indication of at least some loose tiles. Typically tiles can be re-adhered without difficulty but it can sometimes be an indication of inadequate substrate and/or installation that would be difficult to determine in the course of the inspection.

Limitations to Inspection of Interior Furnishing/Storage/Staging limited inspection, Area-Carpets limited inspection of floors: hidden conditions are common, including: previous repairs, water & pet damage etc., No comments are offered on cosmetic finishes.

Sealing Grout & Porous Stone/Tile surfaces throughout the home: I wish there was a simple recommendation for the sealing of grout and porous stone/tile surfaces.  Grouts and porous stone/tile surfaces should be properly sealed with a sealer appropriate to the materials.  Since the types of sealers are different it is important this work be performed by qualified parties that understand the requirements of the surface being sealed.  Some grouts should not be sealed for 30 days after installation, and is often not done with new installations.  Sorting out whether grout and porous surfaces have been properly or improperly sealed typically cannot be determined in the course of a Home Inspection, however immediate color changes as a result of absorption of water would typically indicate lack of sealing.

  • Special care must be taken with granite surfaces as some types of granites (and other stones) do not require a sealer and a sealer may end up looking stained because of the sealer.  For more information of sealing of granite please see the following link: Granite countertop info

Stairs

Stairs to Second Floor

Stairs Enclosed storage under stairs ("Under-side" fire stopping present)

Tempered/Safety glass in stairwell Tempered/Safety glass in stairwell, Safety Glass "etching" present

Stair Risers Closed Risers

Stair Treads Carpeted, tack strip sharp points noted

Stair Side Barriers Conditions (Side barriers adequate)

Headroom Headroom adequate

Handrails present

(S-1) Repair:

There are staples sticking through the carpet at each tread at the riser. This can cause injury to persons using the chairs. these points can be hammered over by a qualified party or other repairs may be possible. This recommendation applies to all of the stairs. I recommend evaluation/repairs by a qualified party.

Stairs to Third Floor

Stairs Stairs to Main Floor (Landings, Landings present at top and bottom)

Stair Risers Closed Risers

Stair Treads Carpeted, tack strip sharp points noted

Stair Side Barriers Conditions (Side barriers adequate)

Headroom Headroom adequate

Handrails present

Fireplaces

Gas Fireplace

Gas Fireplace Fireplace not for use with wood/solid fuels, Function, unit was operating at time of inspection preveing opening of cover under unit

Gas Shut-off Gas shut-off valve (Valve is present)

Unit Gas Controls Unit gas valve/controls

Possible gas line leaks or defects should be corrected immediately. Each gas appliance should have a gas shut off located in the same room/area as the unit. Advise checking for presence and labeling all valves.

Vent Direct vent (Cap Located adjacent to unit at), north side

Air Intakes at Exterior for combustion air to unit concentric vent/air intake

Glass Doors/Operating Controls/Instructions Air-tight type glass panel, Operating controls (Wall switch control to light fireplace), Lighting/maintenance instructions (Present under unit)

Blower none present

(F-2) Improve:

There is no blower installed on the fireplace.  This is common.  I recommend adding fan.  The life expectancy of these units is much greater when used in conjunction with the fan component.  Consult with manufacturer of unit and/or licensed fireplace installation company.

Main Living Room Area(s)

Main Living Area Floors

Floor Coverings General Information No significant defects noted

Wood Unidentified type Laminate

Main Living Area Walls and Ceilings

Drywall Present

Main Living Area Closets

Entryway Closet Present, Crawl Space Access present

(MLRA-1) Improve:

In the context of a home inspection it is not typically possible to determine how adequately closet shelving is installed and whether the installation will support weight or how much weight.  The following comments and recommendations apply to any closets in the home that have built-in shelving. Manufacturers have different requirements for installation but most have specific requirements for installation on drywall, on wall studs and/or on concrete.  Brackets solely supported on the drywall typically are required to have mollies that expand considerably inside the wall behind the drywall.  Evaluation of proper support would typically require the removal of some screws and or verifying attachment to studs.  Collapse of improperly installed shelving units is common and personal injury or property damage could result.

It was determined at the time of inspection--by tapping on the walls along the shelving, and by thermal imaging--that the brackets are NOT attached to the studs or to very few studs, and further evaluation of the installation is advised.  I recommend evaluation/repairs and/or replacement as deemed necessary by a qualified party.

Main Living Area Heat

Room Heat Heat, Forced Air (Rise in temperature noted during operation of heating system)

Master Bedroom

Escape and Rescue openings

Escape and Rescue and Habitability Requirements for Sleeping Rooms Current safety guidelines

Require bedroom windows that are used to meet secondary escape and rescue requirements, meet certain size parameters. Not only are they required to be a "minimum" of 24" high and a "minimum" of 20" wide, these minimum dimensions will vary depending on how tall or wide the window opening is as well as whether the window is at grade or at upper levels of the home. There must also be a minimum of 5 sq ft of "net opening" for windows at grade (5.7 sq ft at higher floor levels). The bottom of the window opening must also not be more than 44" above the floor as well. Upgrading older windows to meet current standards is recommended--especially when replacing the windows.

Bedroom Escape and Rescue Openings Escape & Rescue (window present)

Room Floors

Carpet Present

Room Walls/Ceilings

Drywall Present

Room Closets

Bedroom Closet Present, Built-in storage unit present

Heat

Room Heat Forced Air (Rise in temperature noted during operation of heating system)

Upper South Bedroom

Escape and Rescue openings

Bedroom Escape and Rescue Openings Escape & Rescue (window present)

Room Floors

Carpet Present

Room Walls/Ceilings

Drywall Present

Room Closets

Bedroom Closet Present

Heat

Room Heat Forced Air (Rise in temperature noted during operation of heating system)

Upper SW Bedroom

Escape and Rescue openings

Bedroom Escape and Rescue Openings Escape & Rescue (window present)

Room Floors

Carpet Present

Room Walls/Ceilings

Drywall Present

Room Closets

Bedroom Closet Present

Heat

Room Heat Forced Air (Rise in temperature noted during operation of heating system)

Upper NW Bedroom

Escape and Rescue openings

Bedroom Escape and Rescue Openings Escape & Rescue (window present)

Room Floors

Carpet Present

Room Walls/Ceilings

Drywall Present

Room Closets

Bedroom Closet Present

Heat

Room Heat Forced Air (Rise in temperature noted during operation of heating system)

3rd Floor Room

Escape and Rescue openings

Bedroom Escape and Rescue Openings Escape & Rescue (window present)

Room Floors

Carpet Present

Room Walls/Ceilings

Drywall Present, Thermal Bridging present (Seen in Thermal Imaging)

Heat

Room Heat Forced Air (Rise in temperature noted during operation of heating system)

Main Floor Den

Room Floors

Carpet Present

Room Walls/Ceilings

Drywall Present

Room Closets

Room Closet Present

Heat

Room Heat Forced Air (Rise in temperature noted during operation of heating system)

Master Bathroom

Bathroom Floors

Tile/Stone Tile

Bathroom Walls and Ceilings

Drywall Present

Sinks and Cabinets and Accessories

Sinks Left sink, Sink caulked to countertop in readily visible areas, Type of sink (Porcelain)

Flow of water Flow apparent, Water shut-offs present

Sink Drainage Sink drained, Pop-Up Stopper (Functioned)

Sinks Right sink, Type of sink (Porcelain), Sink caulked to countertop in readily visible areas

Flow of water Flow apparent, Water shut-offs present

Sink Drainage Sink drained, Pop-Up Stopper (Functioned)

Countertops Countertop materials type not identified

Backsplash/Mirrors Back Splash (Same as countertops), Mirror (Clips not visible)

Cabinets Stained Finish Wood Cabinets, Euro-Style Hinges (Euro-Style hinges are prone to loosening, and need to be tightened periodically.)

Accessories Towel bars/hooks present, Toilet Paper holder present

Bathtub and Enclosure

Bathtub Acrylic/Fiberglas type tub

Tub Drainage Water drained, Pop-Up Stopper (Functioned)

Flow of water at Tub Water flowed

Windows/Glass Sill/Glazing on glass less than 60" above floor

Windows around tubs are known for being problematic regarding water damage to wall structures and finishes (both indirectly from the use of the tub and from condensation). These windows should be maintained well caulked and sealed against moisture entry and/or protected from water by curtains and other means.

Shower

Shower Plastic Base (Weep holes open)

Flow of water at Shower Water flowed

Shower Drainage Water drains

Walls around shower Shower/floor connection (Caulked), Tile/Stone Wall enclosure

Curtain/Glass Shower Door, Safety Glass ("Etching" is present)

Tile shower enclosures with plastic bases, cannot be adequately tested for leaks in the context of Standard Home Inspection.  Shower stalls installed under permit are required to be tested during installation, but whether this testing has been done cannot be determined.  I recommend monitoring, especially at the ceiling below the enclosure.  There are flood tests that can be performed, but I only recommend that these be done when you own the home and are willing to take the risk.  Unfortunately this kind of testing will not help you after purchase, with getting repairs made from the previous owner.  I cannot through a visual inspection, or with the amount of water run during the inspection, get to a place of confidence the shower base does not leak.  These shower pans obviously should not leak, but they often do leak under flood-test and may or may not under normal use.  Water should never be allowed to back up out of the clogged drains, as this flooding condition could result in leaking that would not otherwise  happen, and be an indication the drains need cleaning.

Toilet

Toilets Flow of water to toilet (Flow apparent, Water shut-off present), Flushed properly at time of inspection

Tank No issues noted

Bowl floor around toilet checked with a moisture meter, Caulked to floor

When applicable (not installed on concrete) floors around toilets are checked with a moisture meter.

Bathroom Ventilation

Bathroom exhaust fan Toilet Room Vent Fan, Components/Condition/Function (Fan turns on, Air movement noted under door with fan running)

The typical test to see if a fan in pulling air from the room is done by placing a tissue on the fan grille when it is running. If it will not hold the tissue under test the unit is not functioning properly and further evaluation and repairs is recommended. A second method of testing involves seeing if during operation of the fan enough negative pressure is created for their to be air movement under the closed bathroom door. This can also be tested with tissue paper. These are both very limited types of tests.

Vent Termination Through the ceiling type vent (Through the roof, Exterior cap with back draft damper is present, Screen present)

Bathroom exhaust fan #2 Shower Area Vent Fan, Components/Condition/Function (Fan turns on, Air movement noted under door with fan running)

Ducting Flex Plastic Duct, Vent pipe insulated, Conditions

Vent Termination Through the ceiling type vent (Through the roof, Exterior cap with back draft damper is present, Screen present)

(MB-5) Repair:

Two of the bathroom exhaust vents have debris stuck in the termination caps that is preventing full closure of the vent flaps. I recommend that all be checked by a qualified party and repaired as warranted. Discuss with the builder/seller to your satisfaction.

Heat

Room Heat Forced Air (Rise in temperature noted during operation of heating system)

Limitations/Exclusions Related to Bathroom

Limitations/Exclusions Area carpets and other furnishings on floors can conceal damage to floors, Sink and Tub overflows are not tested.

Upper Hallway Bathroom

Bathroom Floors

Tile/Stone Tile

Bathroom Walls and Ceilings

Drywall Present

Sinks and Cabinets and Accessories

Sinks Left sink, Type of sink (Porcelain), Sink caulked to countertop in readily visible areas

Flow of water Flow apparent, Water shut-offs present

Sink Drainage Sink drained, Pop-Up Stopper (Functioned)

Sinks Right sink, Sink caulked to countertop in readily visible areas

Flow of water Flow apparent, Water shut-offs present

Sink Drainage Sink drained, Pop-Up Stopper (Functioned)

Countertops Countertop materials type not identified

Backsplash/Mirrors Back Splash (Same as countertops), Mirror (Clips not visible)

Cabinets Stained Finish Wood Cabinets, Euro-Style Hinges (Euro-Style hinges are prone to loosening, and need to be tightened periodically.)

Accessories Towel bars/hooks present, Toilet Paper holder present

(UHB-1) Repair:

There are large mirrors in all of the bathrooms that do not have any exposed clips. Mirrors, over time, can fail catastrophically without clips as adhesives fail. Bring this to the attention of the builder/seller for repairs or assurances to your satisfaction that the installation is adequate.

Bathtub and Enclosure

Bathtub and/or Bathtub/Shower Acrylic/Fiberglas type tub

Acrylic, fiberglass and other resin-based pre-fab bathtub units are subject to damage with normal use or improper maintenance. Surfaces may become scratched, discolored and/or difficult to clean. Cracks can also develop. These may not be readily visible; and may open up depending on shower usage. Check periodically for damage and resultant leakage.

Tub Drainage Water drained, Pop-Up Stopper (Functioned)

Flow of water at Tub Water flowed, Flow of water at shower (Water flowed)

Walls around tub Tile/Stone Wall enclosure

Curtain/Glass Curtain Rod (Curtain Rod not present)

(UHB-3) Repair:

There is no curtain rod in the Upper Hallway Bathroom and no determination is made as to whether this should be provided or not. Discuss with the builder to your satisfaction.

Toilet

Toilets Flow of water to toilet (Flow apparent, Water shut-off present), Flushed properly at time of inspection

Tank no issues noted

Bowl Caulked to floor

Bidet

Bidet Flow of water to Bidet

Urinal

Urinal Flow of water to Urinal

Bathroom Ventilation

Bathroom exhaust fan Tub Area Vent Fan, Components/Condition/Function (Fan turns on, Air movement noted under door with fan running)

The typical test to see if a fan in pulling air from the room is done by placing a tissue on the fan grille when it is running. If it will not hold the tissue under test the unit is not functioning properly and further evaluation and repairs is recommended. A second method of testing involves seeing if during operation of the fan enough negative pressure is created for their to be air movement under the closed bathroom door. This can also be tested with tissue paper. These are both very limited types of tests.

Ducting Conditions (Vent pipe not visible)

Vent Termination Through the ceiling type vent (Through the roof, Exterior cap with back draft damper is present, Screen present)

Heat

Room Heat Forced Air (Rise in temperature noted during operation of heating system)

Limitations/Exclusions Related to Bathroom

Limitations/Exclusions Area carpets and other furnishings on floors can conceal damage to floors, Sink and Tub overflows are not tested.

Mold or what looks like mold related to bathroom

Fungal/Microbial growth/stains on surfaces Small amounts--moisture levels "currently" below what is considered conducive for continued growth

Main Floor 3/4 Bath

Bathroom Floors

Tile/Stone Tile

Bathroom Walls and Ceilings

Drywall Present

Sinks and Cabinets and Accessories

Sinks Pedestal (Verify sink is bolted to wall, Caulked at wall)

Flow of water Flow apparent, Water shut-offs present

Sink Drainage Sink drained, Pop-Up Stopper (Functioned)

Accessories Towel bars/hooks present, Toilet Paper holder present

Shower

Shower Plastic Base

Flow of water at Shower Water flowed

Shower Drainage Water drains

Walls around shower Tile/Stone Wall enclosure

Curtain/Glass Shower Door, Safety Glass ("Etching" is present)

Tile shower enclosures with plastic bases, cannot be adequately tested for leaks in the context of Standard Home Inspection.  Shower stalls installed under permit are required to be tested during installation, but whether this testing has been done cannot be determined.  I recommend monitoring, especially at the ceiling below the enclosure.  There are flood tests that can be performed, but I only recommend that these be done when you own the home and are willing to take the risk.  Unfortunately this kind of testing will not help you after purchase, with getting repairs made from the previous owner.  I cannot through a visual inspection, or with the amount of water run during the inspection, get to a place of confidence the shower base does not leak.  These shower pans obviously should not leak, but they often do leak under flood-test and may or may not under normal use.  Water should never be allowed to back up out of the clogged drains, as this flooding condition could result in leaking that would not otherwise  happen, and be an indication the drains need cleaning.

Toilet

Toilets Flushed properly at time of inspection, Flow of water to toilet (Water shut-off present)

Tank no defects noted

Bowl Caulked to floor

Bidet

Bidet Flow of water to Bidet

Urinal

Urinal Flow of water to Urinal

Bathroom Ventilation

Bathroom exhaust fan Shower Area Vent Fan, Components/Condition/Function (Fan turns on, Air movement noted under door with fan running)

The typical test to see if a fan in pulling air from the room is done by placing a tissue on the fan grille when it is running. If it will not hold the tissue under test the unit is not functioning properly and further evaluation and repairs is recommended. A second method of testing involves seeing if during operation of the fan enough negative pressure is created for their to be air movement under the closed bathroom door. This can also be tested with tissue paper. These are both very limited types of tests.

Ducting Conditions (Vent pipe not visible)

Vent Termination Through the wall type vent (Terminates at, Exterior cap with back draft damper is present)

Heat

Room Heat Forced Air (Rise in temperature noted during operation of heating system)

Mold or what looks like mold related to bathroom

Fungal/Microbial growth/stains on surfaces Small amounts--moisture levels "currently" below what is considered conducive for continued growth

Kitchen

Kitchen Floors

Wood Unidentified type Laminate

Kitchen Walls and Ceilings

Drywall Present

Kitchen Cabinets/Countertops

Countertops Type of countertop (Stone), Countertop materials type not identified, overhang at island missing corbels

Backsplash Tile

Cabinets Stained Finish Wood Cabinets, Euro-Style Hinges

(K1-1) Improve:

The overhanging countertop at the island is not supported by corbels. For improved safety I recommend proper corbels be installed. It is common for people to stand or sit on these overhangs and I suspect it might be possible to break the edge off. Make improvements on your own or discuss with builder/seller as desired.

Kitchen Sinks

Sink Stainless Steel, Spray Wand (Switched modes normally), Single bowl, Sink caulked to countertop in readily visible areas

Kitchen Sink Water Flow Water flowed, Water shut-offs (present)

Kitchen Sink Drainage Sink Drained

Dishwasher

Manufacturer Electrolux (Frigidaire)

Model # FPID249SSF5A

Serial # KH91221310

Manufacture Date 2019

Years old <1

Air Gap Drain Vented (Johnson Tee present on exterior)

The dishwasher drain line should (and does) incorporate a proper air gap device, typically located on top of the kitchen sink or on the countertop.  Water leaking from the air gap device during the dishwasher drain cycle indicates a blockage in the drain hose from the air gap device to the drain fitting.

The dishwasher drain line should (and does) incorporate a proper air gap device.  Water leaking from the air gap device during the dishwasher drain cycle indicates a blockage in the drain hose from the air gap device to the drain fitting.  The cap at the exterior of the home adjacent to the dishwasher above the flood rim of the sink is a type of air gap device called a Johnson Tee.  Some modern dishwashers require a 5/8" drain.  While the air gap device may be sufficient for the current washer, installation of a new washer may require abandonment of the Johnson Tee and installation of a countertop air gap device.  Modern washers that allow for a 1/2 inch drain are still available.

Function/Testing Turned on, run through "rinse" cycle

Secured in Opening Sides secured

Electrical connection "Plug-in" electrical disconnect in adjacent cabinet

Dishwasher Drain Terminates At Johnson Tee

Conditions/Water Shut-off Water shut-off valve (Present under sink cabinet)

Disposal

Manufacturer In-Sink-Erator

Model # Model # NOT determined--picture out of focus

Serial # 19041328756, Number hard to read--should be verified

Manufacture Date 2019

Years old <1

Function/Testing Unit operated, using switch

Electrical connection Proper power cord (with plug-in electrical disconnect)

Drain guard Present

Cooktop

Manufacturer Frigidaire

Model # Model # NOT determined--data plate missing/not found

Serial # Serial # NOT determined--data plate missing/not found

Manufacture Date Year of manufacture NOT determined--data plate not located

Function/Testing Components heated-up using normal controls, Burner function (All Burners operated normally)

Ranges are only inspected as to basic function---do they turn off and on. How well they perform is not possible in the context of a standard home inspection. Each users experience can be different. Ranges often have issues with noting being level/plumb, oven lights, door gaskets, scorching around gaskets, broken door glass, inadequate/broken door springs, missing shelves/racks, loose/broken door and/or drawer pulls, non-functional indicator lights, non-functional timers, mechanical damage etc. Some of these things may be discussed in the Narrative portion of this report.

Gas Range Re-ignition function (Did not re-light with flame blown out), Gas Shut-off (Behind/Under unit)

(K1-4) Due Diligence:

Many modern gas ranges have auto-relight functions for the burners.  In the event that a gust of wind were to blow out the flame--especially when adjusted very low--the re-light function allows the burner to re-light itself for safety.  This particular unit does not appear to have that function and no determination is made as to whether it can be added or not.  Upgrade/modify as desired.  No further recommendation at this time.

Oven

Manufacturer Frigidaire

Model # FPEW3077RFD

Serial # AF91601608

Manufacture Date 2019

Years Old <1

Function/Testing Oven function (Components heated-up using normal controls), Electric

Ranges are only inspected as to basic function---do they turn off and on. How well they perform is not possible in the context of a standard home inspection. Each users experience can be different. Ranges often have issues with noting being level/plumb, oven lights, door gaskets, scorching around gaskets, broken door glass, inadequate/broken door springs, missing shelves/racks, loose/broken door and/or drawer pulls, non-functional indicator lights, non-functional timers, mechanical damage etc. Some of these things may be discussed in the Narrative portion of this report.

Refrigerator

Manufacturer Electrolux (Frigidaire)

Model # FPBG2278UF2

Serial # 4A92814056

Manufacture Date 2019

Years old <1

Refrigerator Temperature Verify proper temperature

Maintaining proper temperatures inside of refrigerators/freezers can be difficult.  Obtaining thermometers to place in refrigerators and freezers to continually monitor interior temperatures is recommended for food safety.  When the temperature of the refrigerator compartment is above 38 degrees F, the setting should be lowered for the safe keeping of food. When the temperature of the freezer compartment is above 5 degrees F, the setting should be lowered for the safe keeping of food.

Ice Maker Ice cubes present

Conditions Fridge is on GFCI circuit

(K1-8) Note:

The refrigerator is currently connected to the AFCI protected Circuit as required. I recommend that a power outage alarm being installed to avoid thawing of food due to inadvertent tripping of the AFCI circuit.

Microwave

Manufacturer Frigidaire

Serial # KG82888074

Model # FPMO227NUFA

Manufacture Date 2018

Years old 1

Conditions/Function Heated wet paper towel at 20 seconds

Exhaust Fan/Hood

Manufacturer MFG not determined

Function/Testing/Conditions Turned on, using unit controls

400+ CFM Not determined, More than 400 CFM

When exhaust fans exceed 400 CFM, a mechanical means of providing make-up air to the home is required by modern standards.

Exhaust Fan Range Hood, Venting to exterior at, south side adjacent to unit, poor connection possible at exterior cap

Vent Pipe Smooth Wall Metal Duct

Vent Termination Exterior cap with back draft damper is present, Screen missing

(K1-9) Repair:

When the range hood exhaust is more than 400 CFM, and building air changes are less than 5ACH50, a mechanical means (fan activated electronic damper) of bringing fresh air into the home in conjunction with operation of the unit is required by modern standards.

  • M1503.6 Makeup air required. Where one or more gas, liquid or solid fuel-burning appliance that is neither direct-vent nor uses a mechanical draft venting system is located within a dwelling unit’s air barrier, each exhaust system capable of exhausting in excess of 400 cubic feet per minute shall be mechanically or passively provided with makeup air at a rate approximately equal to the exhaust air rate. Such makeup air systems shall be equipped with not fewer than one damper complying with Section M1503.6.2.
  • M1503.6.2 Makeup air dampers. Where makeup air is required makeup air dampers shall comply with this section. Each damper shall be a gravity damper or an electrically operated damper that automatically opens when the exhaust system operates. Dampers shall be located to allow access for inspection, service, repair and replacement without removing permanent construction or any other ducts not connected to the damper being inspected, serviced, repaired or replaced. Gravity or barometric dampers shall not be used in passive makeup air systems except where the dampers are rated to provide the design makeup airflow at a pressure differential 3 Pascals or less.
(K1-11) Repair:

There is no screen installed as required on the cooktop exhaust fan/hood at the east exterior of the home.  I do not like screens on this location but they are required.  If one is going to be installed it would be better to install it on the outside of the damper.  They are prone to clogging with lint/grease over time.  Maintenance is necessary regardless.  Bring to the attention of the builder for possible replacement/repairs is recommended.  Also it was noted that the cap does not appear to be properly connected to the duct and collection of grease and lint is possible and also make cleaning problematic. There appears to be some sort of plastic materials inside the cap as well. I recommend bringing this to the attention of the builder/seller for repairs by a qualified party.

Kitchen Closet/Pantry

Kitchen Closet/Pantry Present

Kitchen Heat

Room Heat Forced Air (Rise in temperature noted during operation of heating system), same as adjacent spaces

Limitations/Exclusions Related to Kitchen

Limitations/Exclusions General Information, Restrictions (Furnishing/Storage/Staging limited inspection, Area-Carpets limited inspection of floors: hidden conditions are common, including: previous repairs, water & pet damage etc., Some appliances not inspected or only partially inspected, Refrigerator(s), Dishwasher(s), Disposer(s), Microwave(s), Cooktop(s), Built-in oven(s), Exhaust vent(s))

Evidence of past leaks under kitchen sinks is common. While I endeavor to verify current leaks at the time of inspection sometimes leaks are incidental or due to specific uses not duplicated at the time of inspection. Monitoring of moisture conditions under sinks should be a normal part of routine home maintenance.

  • Appliances are not moved during the inspection.
  • Dishes and other kitchen storage items can limit inspection of cabinets and countertops. These areas should be reviewed during a final walk-through.
  • Oven self-cleaning operation, timers, and thermostat accuracy are not tested.
  • Refrigerators, freezers, water dispensers, and ice makers are not tested.

Laundry

Laundry Floors

Stone/Tile Tile

Laundry Walls and Ceilings

Drywall Present

Laundry Cabinets/Countertops/Sinks

Countertops Type of countertop (Countertop materials type not identified)

Cabinets Stained Finish Wood Cabinets

Sink Plastic, Sink caulked to countertop in readily visible areas

Flow of water at Laundry Sink Water flowed, Water shut-offs (present)

Drainage of Laundry Sink Sink drainage (Sink Drained)

Dryer

Dryer GENERAL DRYER SAFETY INFORMATION & RECOMMENDATIONS, None Present

Dryer exhaust ducts should be independent of all other systems, should convey the moisture to the outdoors, should terminate on the outside of the building in accordance with the manufacturer’s installation instructions and should be equipped with a back-draft damper. 

  • Exhaust ducts (from the Laundry Room wall to the point of termination at the exterior) should be constructed of rigid metal ducts, having smooth interior surfaces with joints running in the direction of air flow. Screens should not be installed at the duct termination. Exhaust ducts should not be connected with sheet-metal screws or any means which extend into the duct. (Screens and screws can trap lint.)
  •  Every dryer should have a screen filter to help keep dryer lint from entering the vent pipe itself.  This filter must be maintained clean at all times and clogging this screen will result in increased drying time as well be a fire hazard.  Some fabric softeners, sheet or liquid types, also clog these screens and air flow is reduced even when the screen "looks" clean.  Avoiding these products is recommended and using more natural alternatives is a possibility.
  • The short piece of duct that connects the dryer to the pipe that runs to the exterior of the building is called the dryer transition duct or connector.  This connector is required to be UL-2158A listed and be constructed of smooth wall metal, corrugated metal, or foil types that are UL-2158A listed.  Dryer manufacturers do not recommend foil type connectors, and most “common” foil type air connectors do not meet the required standard.  Under extreme heat (during field testing) aluminum ducts of all kinds do poorly as connectors (even when UL-2158A listed), but the common foil types perform much worse and should never be used as transition duct.  All of these types of transition ducts are extremely vulnerable to mechanical damage, which results in either leaks or restriction of air flow.  There is one foil type dryer transition duct, that exceeds UL-2158A standard that holds up much better under extreme heat than either smooth wall metal or corrugated metal and is the one I recommend as best practice.  DryerFlex™ type of transition connector typically cannot be purchased from your local big-box stores and is sold by duct cleaning and maintenance companies--or can be ordered on line.
  • Regardless of code or UL listing, he National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA) recommend only rigid metal or corrugated metal transition duct be used. NFPA Dryer Safety Tips
  • Given dryers are one of the most common causes of household fires, I consider it prudent to use the best transition duct possible and to keep the vent system and dryer itself as free of lint build-up as possible.  Annual professional cleaning is recommended.

Manufacturer ____________

Model # ____________

Serial # ___________

Electric Dryer Electric is Available, 240 Volt Dryer Outlet, 4 prong receptacle outlet

Ducting (from transition duct to exterior) Vent pipe from Transition Duct to point of termination at Exterior, Where vent pipe travels (Through the Floor/Ceiling)

Dryer vent pipe requirements for any particular brand of dryer cannot usually be determined during a typical home inspection. All dryer manufacturers have maximum lengths of runs and those lengths can be greatly reduced by whether the vent pipe is vertical or horizontal, how many elbows the run has and even the type of termination cap. All new or replacement installations should verify that any piping already in place meets the requirements of the specific dryer manufacturer and modified as deemed necessary by the appliance installer per manufacturer's installation instructions.

Vent Termination Exterior Cap (Wall vent, Louver type cap)

(L-3) Improve:

The louver type vent cap at the exterior are problematic in that the heat from the dryer tends to deform the louvers so that they don't open properly.  Replacement of this type of cap with a type with a single flap is recommended.

Washer

Washer None installed

Manufacturer ___________

Model # ____________

Serial # ___________

Electrical connections 120 Volt Washer Outlet, AFCI/GFCI protected

Water Supply Water shut-off's present

Drains Into Stand Pipe

Washing machine drain lines can be difficult (if not impossible) to fully assess in the context of a Standard Home Inspection.  Back-ups and clogging of these drains is very common.  Sometimes the drain only backs up after two or three loads and appears to drain satisfactorily with  only occasional loads of laundry.  Monitoring of these drains while using the washer is encouraged until a realistic level of confidence about the drains functionality can be determined.  Water coming out of the drain indicated poor drainage and should be further evaluated by a qualified plumber.

Leak Tray under Washer Overflow tray/drain NOT present but recommended/necessary

(L-5) Improve:

Washing machines located on finished floors should have trays to prevent damage from flooding. When possible it is also recommended that the tray have a drain to the exterior to prevent overflow of the tray.  High water alarms can be installed to monitor trays without drains.  There are many manufacturers of these trays and some trays are better than others.  Inexpensive and flimsy trays should be avoided as damaged trays or trays with poor drain connections may provide no more protection against flooding than if there was no tray at all.

Laundry Ventilation

Laundry exhaust fan Fan maintenance

Over time exhaust fans can collect a lot of lint.  This lint can become a fire hazard.  Regular cleaning of these units should be performed by a qualified party.  I recommend they be cleaned once a year until a cleaning history is established.  At that point it can be determined if cleaning is necessary more or less frequently.  I typically do not dismantle these units to see if they need cleaning or not, so being proactive about cleaning is recommended.  I recommend evaluation/repairs and/or replacement as deemed necessary by a qualified party.

Ducting Flex Plastic Duct, Vent pipe not visible

Vent Termination Through the ceiling type vent, terminates at, Conditions (Exterior cap with back draft damper is present, Screen present)

Laundry Heat

Room Heat Forced Air (Rise in temperature noted during operation of heating system)

Limitations/Exclusions Related to Laundry

Limitations/Exclusions Laundry General Information, Restrictions (Some "common" appliances/components not present)

Evidence of past leaks under laundry sinks is common. While I endeavor to verify current leaks at the time of inspection sometimes leaks are incidental or due to specific uses not duplicated at the time of inspection. Monitoring of moisture conditions under sinks should be a normal part of routine home maintenance.

  • Appliances are not moved during the inspection.
  • Storage items can limit inspection of cabinets and countertops. These areas should be reviewed during a final walk-through.

Wood Destroying Organisms (WDO's)

Wood Destroying Insects, Fungi and Conducive Conditions

Washington State Rules and information related to WDO's Duties of the Licensed Structural Pest Inspector

In accordance with the provisions of the Revised Code of Washington (RAW) 15.58.450, this report relates to a single sale, transfer, exchange, or refinance and is not transferable to and may not be relied upon by parties involved in any subsequent sale, transfer, exchange, or refinance of the same property.

  • The findings listed within this report are determined by the inspector based on a visual inspection conducted in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 16-228-2005 through 2045 and are subject to the limitations within this report, the standards listed below, and as modified by any and all associated reports attached.
  • This inspector endeavors to perform their services in a professional manner consistent with the care and skill ordinarily exercised by structural pest inspection professionals. This inspector will re-perform any services not meeting this standard without additional compensation.
  • For every inspection a "site-plan" diagram is prepared detailing the locations of Wood Destroying Organism issues. WAC 16-228-2045 requires that a diagram be prepared for WDO Inspection Reports. A copy is available upon request.

Conducive Conditions Buildings with crawl spaces

Conducive Conditions for buildings with crawl spaces, consists of any materials on the property or in the crawl space that can provide food or habitat for wood destroying organisms. These materials can consist of plumbing leaks, form boards left in place, storage items, roots and other vegetation etc.

Limitations and Exclusions related to WDO's General considerations, Some attic spaces were inaccessible at time of inspection, Some above ceiling spaces were inaccessible at time of inspection (not typically required)

Many Wood Destroying Organisms have dormant periods and can operate unseen behind walls and insulation. While I attempt to identify rot and insect infestation whenever I can, there can never be any guarantee that there are no infestations of any kind in the home just because infestations were not seen at the time of inspection. Maintaining the home free of Wood Destroying Organisms is an ongoing process that requires vigilance and immediate attention when discovered.

  • Interiors of walls and finished floors/ceilings/roofs can not be "directly" inspected for Wood Destroying Organisms.
  • No treatment of Wood Destroying Organisms is provided as part of a Standard Home Inspection.

Last-But-Not_Least

Things to remember

Things for buyer's due diligence See notes below and, ask seller for:

Homeowner Associations Information you may want, see notes below

(LBNL1-1) Note:

THINGS FOR BUYERS TO THINK ABOUT: Ask seller for:

  • samples or records of paint colors used on the premises.
  • copies of construction records/permits.
  • all available owner's manuals for: Furnace, Thermostats, Appliances, Fan Timers, Remote Control Devices, Gas Fireplaces, Gas Cooktops, Fire Suppression System, Alarm Security System, Water Heaters etc.
  • Obtain keys/combinations to all locks.
(LBNL1-2) Note:

  • Get minutes of Homeowner Association meetings.

Receipt -- Residential Inspection

Report #: 191107A
Inspection Date: 2019-11-07

Property Inspected For 
New Construction
1947 Road Lane, Erehwon, WA 98155

Inspection with digital report$825.00
$825.00
PAID


Charles Buell Inspections INC
C/O Charles Buell
17123 22nd Ave NE
Shoreline, WA 98155
206-478-7371

Signed Contracts